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Magic Water

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  • Member since
    November, 2012
  • 78 posts
Magic Water
Posted by Mavryk on Friday, November 16, 2012 6:34 AM

I was wondering if anyone here has used (or has seen) this stuff and noticed the same thing i have.

 

I was watching a youtuve tutorial video on it and the first thing i noticed was it seems to "creep" up the edges of the layout as it dries. The guy running the video says it works better than anything ever seen before. I disagree and I haven't even used the stuff before. Granted, after it dries, it looks very real as water it's self, but if it creeps up the edges, I think it takes away from the overall look.

 

Before i go spending my money on this, I'd like to hear from anyone that's used it. What are your thoughts?

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Posted by richhotrain on Friday, November 16, 2012 6:53 AM

I have not used Magic Water, but I have used Woodland Scenics Realistic Water several times in the past, and I have not had any such problems.

What type of surface are you using to pour the water onto, and how have you prepared the surface for the application of the Magic Water?

Rich

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Posted by HHPATH56 on Friday, November 16, 2012 7:05 AM
The cascading river in the photo shows how I used Magic water. It is true that capillary action casuses it to creep, but I merely repainted the edge of the river to hide the shiny creep. This view shows how I used two bridges to hide the horizontal-vertical transition, and to add forced perspective with the curve of the river in the backdrop. I hid the mismatch in color of the blue sky above the photo background by stippling in clouds with a dry brush technique. Some people prefer "Envirotex water" , but I still prefer Magic Water, with Water Effects to show white water of waterfalls For a large harbor I used the plastic,(as used in doors), with random raised shiny perks of water, as in a harbor. I painted the smooth back of the plastic dark blue-green. The plastic sheet can be cut by scribing and snapping the plastic. Note the water in the second photo. Bob Hahn   .
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Posted by jeffrey-wimberly on Friday, November 16, 2012 7:31 AM

It would be nice to see something bigger than thumbnail photos.Smile

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Posted by dknelson on Friday, November 16, 2012 8:43 AM

I had no creeping problem when I applied it to create a creek under a bridge about 2 feet long and perhaps 2 to 2 1/2 inches wide and maybe 1/4 to 3/8 inch deep.  But even if I had, I would be doing final scenicking on the banks of the creek anyway. 

Perhaps the relatively shallow creek I used it for is what prevented any particular creep.  Also I had a fairly hard and nonabsorbant surface for the banks of the creek -- if I had had banks of say ballast like stone then perhaps it would have creeped into gaps.   I doubt if it has any particular creeping qualities that other similar pour-based water effects products have.  It is not viscous in any way but very watery as it comes out. 

Dave Nelson

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Posted by gandydancer19 on Friday, November 16, 2012 8:55 AM

Envirotex also creeps up the bank some.  Just paint over the area above the water line with matt medium an it will go back to being flat again.  All modeling process have some particular techniques to them to get them looking right.

Elmer.

The above is my opinion, from an active and experienced Model Railroader in N scale and HO since 1961.

(Modeling Freelance, Eastern US, HO scale, in 1962, with NCE DCC for locomotive control and a stand alone LocoNet for block detection and signals.) http://waynes-trains.com/ at home, and N scale at the Club.

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Posted by HHPATH56 on Friday, November 16, 2012 9:07 AM
Hi Jef, For years I used Photobucket photos, and when you clicked on them they would enlarge. I don't know what I did wrong. My thumbnail photos get smaller on a black background now, when you click on them. The change in Photobucket format is that you have small size photos. Then, when you click on the desired photo, the word "Share" appears. I must then click on Links above to get the word Copied to the IMG link, for Trains.com/forum code Posting. Are all of you guys having the same trouble with Photobucket, or have I changed something, that I am unaware of? Bob Hahn
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Posted by superbe on Friday, November 16, 2012 9:31 AM

Several years ago some one posted a dock scene with the ocean in the background. I was taken back by the water effects on the pilings and rock in the harbor showing where the water level was at high tide. It added a whole lot to the realisim of the scene.

Now I know it wasn't so much the modler's skill as it was magic water creep, but I'm sure he planned it that way.

Bob

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Posted by wsdimenna on Friday, November 16, 2012 11:29 AM

I use magic water exclusively.   It has no odor, when it dries it is not brittle. Have used in conjunction with clear caulk ( comes out white and drys clear, unles covered with magic water , then its muted grey).  We add it in fine layers coloring each layer with enamel paint so its still partially transparent.  This is late summer color (drought conditions in our area) so water is green/blue tint.

with caulk water falls

here is an edge, without creep.

To avoid creep, we make a caulk bead around water area, seal with paint, then add magic water.

once we have completed water scene. the scenery base is applied down to waters edge, sculpted and ground covers added.  Water color is mostly a reflection of the area around the water. An area of water in ffall would tend towards a copper, or tan color.

Tags: Water
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Posted by Mavryk on Friday, November 16, 2012 4:44 PM

Rich, I haven't actually used Magic Water yet, just saw it being advertised in a tutorial video last night. I found the creeping a bit of a pointless thing, but i never thought of retouching the banks after the product has dried. I would imagine if someone was to paint the banks (for the first time) after the Magic Water is dry, then it'll save a bit of time there.

WS, I really love how you did your water there. I actually shivered when i saw it. Looks cold. I am definately going to keep your method in mind when i start my layout. Clear caulking over Magic Water looks amazing.

 

I'm wondering though, is there a point to the drying time where you can work the Magic Water to create ripples? I'm thinking about small ripples like arouind someone wading in the water or a rowboat sitting moored to a peer or something like it.

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Posted by Grampys Trains on Friday, November 16, 2012 5:48 PM

I used Magic Water for all my streams with WS Water Effects to make the ripples. DJ.

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Posted by wsdimenna on Friday, November 16, 2012 8:00 PM

there is a time when the magic water becomes thick enough to make ripples, but its difficult to predict.  I pour multiple thin layers, usually 3-4.  the above was done on a blue base with tinting of green, green yellow and green. the caulk was added to curing magic water after second or third layer.  the ripples at head of river from caulk were dry brushed with iridescent white. 

If I had to guess I would say after about  12-18 hrs you may try making ripples.  It takes 24 hrs to setup. Think the water effects, caulk or an acrylic gloss medium would be better for ripples

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Posted by Mavryk on Saturday, November 17, 2012 9:02 AM

You guys have some serious skill. I can't see my first layout looking that good, but i love details, so I'll be working on it. Thanks for sharing those pics. Water looks amazing. Makes me want to go fishing.

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Posted by mlehman on Saturday, November 17, 2012 12:35 PM

All the water simulation products have some creep factor, so it's a matter of using the correct techniques to limit and disguise it.  WS has a great idea with the caulk as one way to limit creep, along with some other good tips from those who've already weighed in.

In general, it's best to experiment a little before doing that big pour for the harbor scene you've always wanted, Once you get a handle on how your stuff acts, then plan for disguising the edges that creep. Weeds and other  vegetation or extra sand works well for various shorelines. Barnacles or pond scum can help with pilings just above the waterline.

Mike Lehman

Urbana, IL

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Posted by CTValleyRR on Saturday, November 17, 2012 5:13 PM

The thing about water is that it moves.  It's rare to see a real lake or stream where the area right next to the real water isn't also wet.  I actually think the "creep" people are discussing simulates this rather well, and isn't objectionable unless it's severe.

For making ripples, though, I let my water product set completely, then go back and add ripples with acrylic gloss gel.

Connecticut Valley Railroad A Branch of the New York, New Haven, and Hartford

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Posted by mlehman on Sunday, November 18, 2012 12:01 AM

CTValleyRR

The thing about water is that it moves.  It's rare to see a real lake or stream where the area right next to the real water isn't also wet.  I actually think the "creep" people are discussing simulates this rather well, and isn't objectionable unless it's severe.

SNIP

CT,

Exactly my point in suggesting people experiment with what they're working with. In some cases it actually works in your favor. The issue is when you get "creep" when you don't want "creep," so keeping it where you want it does take some experience if you haven't worked with a technique or product before.

The polyester casting resin I use is one of the big offenders, as it's so thin when laid down it likes to wick upward easily. Some other materials are easier to manage in places where creep is an issue.

Mike Lehman

Urbana, IL

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Posted by SPtrain-nut on Monday, November 19, 2012 10:25 PM

Patience and multiple thin layers do the trick. Before putting it into your layout, try a test run by building a small diorama. When building that also test build some elements you might want to highlight along your waterway layout scene such as docks, riverside structures, etc. You can always sell the diorama scene online if for a few bucks, get paid for your test runs.

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Posted by Mavryk on Monday, November 19, 2012 11:09 PM

SPtrain-nut
You can always sell the diorama scene online if for a few bucks, get paid for your test runs.

It amazes me what some people will buy. Laugh

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