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Peco N Scale Turnouts and mounting switch motors

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  • Member since
    March 2001
  • From: Flat Rock, IL
  • 94 posts
Peco N Scale Turnouts and mounting switch motors
Posted by jdtractorboy on Monday, September 22, 2003 11:08 PM
Hi,
I am attempting to mount peco switch motors to switches by drilling a hole for the rod to come up and mounting the motor on the underside of the layout. I have a few questions.
1.) I am having a heck of a time lining up the rod and switch and motor so that i works smoothly (throwing it manually). any tips on how to jude alignment and is it that important. i.e. is the motor powerful enough to overcome some misalignment?

2.) HOW IN THE HECK TO DO YOU MOUNT THEM TO THE BOTTOM OF THE PLYWOOD??? I have been taking the metal tabs and bending them so they face outwards and flush with the underside of the layout. Then placing a screw in beteen the tabs. This is NOT WORKING WELL. Whats a better way without cutting out the plywood and attaching it direcly to the turnout?

3.) How do I wire them? What is needed? If i use the accesories terminal from a MRC Tech 2 1500, will i need a resistor beteen the pushbutton and the machine? And what wires go where, or is it trial and error?

Thanks guys, this has really been holding up the progress on my layout and I am anxious to push forward.

Chuck McDonald
Ask not what your Model Railroad can do to you...Ask what you can do to your Model Railroad! Modeling in N-Scale a Fictional Crossing of the NKP, WM with other "trackage rights" for fun!
  • Member since
    March 2001
  • From: Flat Rock, IL
  • 94 posts
Peco N Scale Turnouts and mounting switch motors
Posted by jdtractorboy on Monday, September 22, 2003 11:08 PM
Hi,
I am attempting to mount peco switch motors to switches by drilling a hole for the rod to come up and mounting the motor on the underside of the layout. I have a few questions.
1.) I am having a heck of a time lining up the rod and switch and motor so that i works smoothly (throwing it manually). any tips on how to jude alignment and is it that important. i.e. is the motor powerful enough to overcome some misalignment?

2.) HOW IN THE HECK TO DO YOU MOUNT THEM TO THE BOTTOM OF THE PLYWOOD??? I have been taking the metal tabs and bending them so they face outwards and flush with the underside of the layout. Then placing a screw in beteen the tabs. This is NOT WORKING WELL. Whats a better way without cutting out the plywood and attaching it direcly to the turnout?

3.) How do I wire them? What is needed? If i use the accesories terminal from a MRC Tech 2 1500, will i need a resistor beteen the pushbutton and the machine? And what wires go where, or is it trial and error?

Thanks guys, this has really been holding up the progress on my layout and I am anxious to push forward.

Chuck McDonald
Ask not what your Model Railroad can do to you...Ask what you can do to your Model Railroad! Modeling in N-Scale a Fictional Crossing of the NKP, WM with other "trackage rights" for fun!
  • Member since
    January 2001
  • From: US
  • 1,300 posts
Posted by Sperandeo on Tuesday, September 23, 2003 9:49 AM
Hello Chuck,

As you probably know, the metal tabs on the Peco switch machine are meant to connect directly to the plastic tie molding of the Peco turnouts, but this requires a lage hole in the roadbed to accept the switch machine. To mount the machine under the roadbed, Peco offers the PL-9 mounting plate. See Peco's Web site at www.peco-uk.com.

The metal tabs of the switch machine fit into the plate and then the plate can be screwed to the bottom of the roadbed. The plate does need to be centered under the turnout's switch rod and perpendicular to the rails.

The center terminal on the side of the switch machine is the common connection for both coils and should be wired to connect to one terminal of your power supply. The other power supply terminal should be wired to one terminal of each of the push buttons controlling the switch machine. The second terminal of the push button should be wired to one of the outer terminals on the switch machine. Whichever coil is energized, by pushing the button connected to that coil, will move the actuating rod in the direction of that coil. No resistors are needed – in fact resistors aren't a good idea at all in this circuit. You want to be sure to use momentary buttons that only energize the coils when pushed. If these coils are powered continously they will overheat and burn out. See pages 91 and 92 in my book, "Easy Model Railroad Wiring," and figure 9-3 on page 92.

And by the way, thanks for signing your name.

Good luck,

Andy

Andy Sperandeo MODEL RAILROADER Magazine

  • Member since
    January 2001
  • From: US
  • 1,300 posts
Posted by Sperandeo on Tuesday, September 23, 2003 9:49 AM
Hello Chuck,

As you probably know, the metal tabs on the Peco switch machine are meant to connect directly to the plastic tie molding of the Peco turnouts, but this requires a lage hole in the roadbed to accept the switch machine. To mount the machine under the roadbed, Peco offers the PL-9 mounting plate. See Peco's Web site at www.peco-uk.com.

The metal tabs of the switch machine fit into the plate and then the plate can be screwed to the bottom of the roadbed. The plate does need to be centered under the turnout's switch rod and perpendicular to the rails.

The center terminal on the side of the switch machine is the common connection for both coils and should be wired to connect to one terminal of your power supply. The other power supply terminal should be wired to one terminal of each of the push buttons controlling the switch machine. The second terminal of the push button should be wired to one of the outer terminals on the switch machine. Whichever coil is energized, by pushing the button connected to that coil, will move the actuating rod in the direction of that coil. No resistors are needed – in fact resistors aren't a good idea at all in this circuit. You want to be sure to use momentary buttons that only energize the coils when pushed. If these coils are powered continously they will overheat and burn out. See pages 91 and 92 in my book, "Easy Model Railroad Wiring," and figure 9-3 on page 92.

And by the way, thanks for signing your name.

Good luck,

Andy

Andy Sperandeo MODEL RAILROADER Magazine

  • Member since
    January 2001
  • From: Guelph, Ont.
  • 1,476 posts
Posted by BR60103 on Tuesday, September 23, 2003 8:28 PM
Chuck
I posted a note some months ago on this topic.
To position the screws properly, spread out the tabs and put the machine updise down on top of the turnout and put the pin through the hole in the tie bar. (You should have drilled an operating hole first.) Then mark where the tabs gaps are. You will need to try a bit, moving the machine and the points to find what the range is. Then pick 2 appropriate points and drill down wards with a 3/32 bit. You should be able to put the machine below the layout and have 2 screws in the right place.
I use #8 screws with a very wide head; you might need washers. They should be tight enough to hold your machines.
In HO, I found the holes should be just beyond the ends of the tie bar.

--David

  • Member since
    January 2001
  • From: Guelph, Ont.
  • 1,476 posts
Posted by BR60103 on Tuesday, September 23, 2003 8:28 PM
Chuck
I posted a note some months ago on this topic.
To position the screws properly, spread out the tabs and put the machine updise down on top of the turnout and put the pin through the hole in the tie bar. (You should have drilled an operating hole first.) Then mark where the tabs gaps are. You will need to try a bit, moving the machine and the points to find what the range is. Then pick 2 appropriate points and drill down wards with a 3/32 bit. You should be able to put the machine below the layout and have 2 screws in the right place.
I use #8 screws with a very wide head; you might need washers. They should be tight enough to hold your machines.
In HO, I found the holes should be just beyond the ends of the tie bar.

--David

  • Member since
    February 2001
  • From: US
  • 506 posts
Posted by snowey on Wednesday, September 24, 2003 1:11 AM
to wire them, you solder a wire to one terminal (soldering lug) then solder the other end of that wire to the other lug that's next to it. In other words, 2 of the lugs on 1 of the long sides. Then, solder another wire to that, and attach it to the common terminal of the controller. On ATLAS controllers, the common terminal is the middle screw. Then solderr a wire to each of the other lugs, and attach it to the remaining two screws on your controller.
Like Andy says, be sure and use momentary controllers, like the ATLAS ones.

For this, and all your other wiring questions, get a copy of "Easy Model Railroad Wiring" by Andy Sperandeo, from Kalmbach publishing. It's a GREAT book, and tells you everything you need to know, in clear, easy to understand text and illustrastions. It's been a BIG help to me!
"I have a message...Lt. Col....Henry Blakes plane...was shot down...over the Sea Of Japan...it spun in...there were no survivors".
  • Member since
    February 2001
  • From: US
  • 506 posts
Posted by snowey on Wednesday, September 24, 2003 1:11 AM
to wire them, you solder a wire to one terminal (soldering lug) then solder the other end of that wire to the other lug that's next to it. In other words, 2 of the lugs on 1 of the long sides. Then, solder another wire to that, and attach it to the common terminal of the controller. On ATLAS controllers, the common terminal is the middle screw. Then solderr a wire to each of the other lugs, and attach it to the remaining two screws on your controller.
Like Andy says, be sure and use momentary controllers, like the ATLAS ones.

For this, and all your other wiring questions, get a copy of "Easy Model Railroad Wiring" by Andy Sperandeo, from Kalmbach publishing. It's a GREAT book, and tells you everything you need to know, in clear, easy to understand text and illustrastions. It's been a BIG help to me!
"I have a message...Lt. Col....Henry Blakes plane...was shot down...over the Sea Of Japan...it spun in...there were no survivors".
  • Member since
    January 2001
  • From: US
  • 1,300 posts
Posted by Sperandeo on Wednesday, September 24, 2003 9:22 AM
Thank you very much, "Snowey." I'm glad that I could help. - Andy

Andy Sperandeo MODEL RAILROADER Magazine

  • Member since
    January 2001
  • From: US
  • 1,300 posts
Posted by Sperandeo on Wednesday, September 24, 2003 9:22 AM
Thank you very much, "Snowey." I'm glad that I could help. - Andy

Andy Sperandeo MODEL RAILROADER Magazine

  • Member since
    April 2003
  • 302,278 posts
Posted by Anonymous on Saturday, September 27, 2003 5:46 AM
The Peco PL10's (Switch Machines) are meant to fit directly to the Peco switches themselves, you will find that the PL10 has four lugs protruding from the motor, these fit into the switches holes provided.
  • Member since
    April 2003
  • 302,278 posts
Posted by Anonymous on Saturday, September 27, 2003 5:46 AM
The Peco PL10's (Switch Machines) are meant to fit directly to the Peco switches themselves, you will find that the PL10 has four lugs protruding from the motor, these fit into the switches holes provided.
  • Member since
    February 2001
  • From: Australia
  • 19 posts
Posted by locomcf on Saturday, October 25, 2003 5:23 AM
Mounting the motors directly to the points leaves a hole that is hard to hide and harder to ballast. For my N scale layout I've developed a device made of styrene sheet and cork roadbed that fits between the motor and the point, and completely covers the hole without impairing performance. They only take a few minutes to make and install.

If anyone is interested, email me and I'll send some photos and instructions.

Regards,
Ron
Ron McFarlane
  • Member since
    February 2001
  • From: Australia
  • 19 posts
Posted by locomcf on Saturday, October 25, 2003 5:23 AM
Mounting the motors directly to the points leaves a hole that is hard to hide and harder to ballast. For my N scale layout I've developed a device made of styrene sheet and cork roadbed that fits between the motor and the point, and completely covers the hole without impairing performance. They only take a few minutes to make and install.

If anyone is interested, email me and I'll send some photos and instructions.

Regards,
Ron
Ron McFarlane
  • Member since
    September 2002
  • From: Nova Scotia, Northumberland Shore
  • 2,421 posts
Posted by der5997 on Saturday, October 25, 2003 11:49 AM
Two more notes:
Peco does an extension for the rod coming up throught the roadbed,if you should need it. A short brass tube fits onto the actuating rod, and another piece of rod fits into the other end of the tube. ACC can help keep the parts together.

Also, Peco does a surface mount (that's what the little bumps at the ends of the turnout throw rod are for) A rather thick (in N) plastic rod connects the switch machine to the motor that is sitting on a plastic base beside the track. A building or other scenery can hide the motor. It would be possible to replace the Pece plastic rod with wire, I expect.
As a last resort, this may be a solution.

"There are always alternatives, Captain" - Spock.

  • Member since
    September 2002
  • From: Nova Scotia, Northumberland Shore
  • 2,421 posts
Posted by der5997 on Saturday, October 25, 2003 11:49 AM
Two more notes:
Peco does an extension for the rod coming up throught the roadbed,if you should need it. A short brass tube fits onto the actuating rod, and another piece of rod fits into the other end of the tube. ACC can help keep the parts together.

Also, Peco does a surface mount (that's what the little bumps at the ends of the turnout throw rod are for) A rather thick (in N) plastic rod connects the switch machine to the motor that is sitting on a plastic base beside the track. A building or other scenery can hide the motor. It would be possible to replace the Pece plastic rod with wire, I expect.
As a last resort, this may be a solution.

"There are always alternatives, Captain" - Spock.

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