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Ice blocks

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Ice blocks
Posted by mreagant on Thursday, September 9, 2021 1:15 PM

I have several 3D printed blocks ( grey plastic) that I got for another project and I'm wondering if there is a way to paint some of them to resemble blocks of ice for my ho iceing platform. Anyone done this or have a suggestion?

Mike Thomasson

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Posted by BATMAN on Thursday, September 9, 2021 2:25 PM

I would experiment with some white glue with paint mixed into it, greys and whites a speck of blue/green. Paint it onto the block in a very thin coat. It may take a bit of trial and error, just practice on a sheet of plastic until you get the colour(s) you think looks good. Use weathering powders to get staining from dirt or sawdust after the paint is dry.

Brent

It's not the age honey, it's the mileage.

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Posted by gmpullman on Thursday, September 9, 2021 2:33 PM

mreagant
Anyone done this or have a suggestion?

 

https://www.tichytraingroup.com/Shop/tabid/91/p/8172-ice-blocks/Default.aspx

 

Good Luck, Ed

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Posted by Lastspikemike on Thursday, September 9, 2021 5:47 PM

Would it be feasible to use any of the resin water products to coat the surface after painting with a silvery white? The appearance of natural cut ice blocks varies with ambient conditions so a wide variety of possible looks would give the correct appearance. Blocks in the same place on the same imaginary day would look similar. Colder ambient conditions would give blocks a frosted appearance. Warm would tend to show more transparency. 

Alyth Yard

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Posted by kasskaboose on Thursday, September 9, 2021 5:50 PM

Why not use foam blocks and then paint them white?

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Posted by Lastspikemike on Thursday, September 9, 2021 8:49 PM

kasskaboose

Why not use foam blocks and then paint them white?

 

White wouldn't look quite right. Ice is a funny colour, greyish translucence. 

Alyth Yard

Canada

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Posted by PC101 on Thursday, September 9, 2021 9:39 PM

gmpullman
 
mreagant
Anyone done this or have a suggestion?

 

 

https://www.tichytraingroup.com/Shop/tabid/91/p/8172-ice-blocks/Default.aspx

 

Good Luck, Ed

 

Sometimes I like simple. Now where did I park that ice truck.

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Posted by MisterBeasley on Thursday, September 9, 2021 11:15 PM

Get a piece of quarter inch square clear plastic rod.  Cut it into blocks with a razor saw.

It takes an iron man to play with a toy iron horse. 

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Posted by mobilman44 on Friday, September 10, 2021 4:53 AM

I used a very thinned Testors gloss white on my plastic "ice" blocks.  Sitting on the icing dock, they looked pretty realistic.  Keep in mind they are viewed (usually) from a bit of a distance, and you do want some color on them so they are visible.  

ENJOY  !

 

Mobilman44

 

Living in southeast Texas, formerly modeling the "postwar" Santa Fe and Illinois Central 

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Posted by snjroy on Friday, September 10, 2021 11:19 AM

MisterBeasley

Get a piece of quarter inch square clear plastic rod.  Cut it into blocks with a razor saw.

 

Yes, the guys at our club took a piece of clear acrylic, cut it into blocks, and sanded them using fine grade of sandpaper. It's very convincing. 

Simon

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Posted by doctorwayne on Friday, September 10, 2021 9:47 PM

mreagant
Anyone done this or have a suggestion?

Ed's suggestion is the same as what I would have suggested...you should check the link which he included.

Wayne

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Posted by mreagant on Sunday, September 12, 2021 10:33 AM

A lot of good ideas. Thanks. I will point out that the question was how to use the grey plastic blocks I have, so using other materials doesn't really answer my need. 

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Posted by BATMAN on Sunday, September 12, 2021 12:58 PM

mreagant

A lot of good ideas. Thanks. I will point out that the question was how to use the grey plastic blocks I have, so using other materials doesn't really answer my need. 

 

My response was based on what you said as I have been watching a lot of 3D printing videos on Youtube and FB lately and I think it was a FB one where the guy had printed off 3D ice blocks. He mixed paint with white glue and it was amazing the result.

 

Brent

It's not the age honey, it's the mileage.

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Posted by doctorwayne on Sunday, September 12, 2021 3:47 PM

BATMAN
My response was based on what you said as I have been watching a lot of 3D printing videos on Youtube and FB lately and I think it was a FB one where the guy had printed off 3D ice blocks. He mixed paint with white glue and it was amazing the result.

Some pictures or a link would be useful, Brent. Smile 

I used the "ice" blocks from Walthers ice house, and they look good enough to me.

Wayne

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Posted by BATMAN on Sunday, September 12, 2021 4:44 PM

Wayne, I went back to see if I could find it. I am pretty sure it was on FB as I also watched this guy do other stuff using white glue and paint mixed. The results are quite something. 

One complaint I have with FB is I can never find things on it again. I still don't have my tiny brain around how it works. If anyone can tell me how to post a FB video here please do as there have been several good ones I have tried to post. Photo's no problem, videos.Dunce

Brent

It's not the age honey, it's the mileage.

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Posted by snjroy on Monday, September 13, 2021 10:40 AM

If you want to "recycle" your 3D prints, it will be a challenge to get that icy, transluscent look. You might want to look at pictures like this one:

https://www.icesourcegroup.com/60-tons-per-day-block-ice-machine-plant-malaysia

The glossy look is easy to achieve with a gloss varnish (Testors comes to mind). For the color, you might want to try to airbrush the block with a coat of light gray, then airbrush a light coat of white over that, but without covering the gray entirely. Then apply a good heavy coat of gloss.

Simon

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Posted by BATMAN on Tuesday, September 14, 2021 1:26 PM

doctorwayne
Some pictures or a link would be useful, Brent.  

I am still shut out trying to find the video I wanted to find, however, this morning I was chatting with someone about mixing paint into white glue and he sent me this, I don't know where it is from, and neither did he but he said it was paint or ink mixed into white glue for the effect. It is worth experimenting with.

No photo description available.

Brent

It's not the age honey, it's the mileage.

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Posted by doctorwayne on Tuesday, September 14, 2021 3:28 PM

BATMAN
...it was paint or ink mixed into white glue for the effect. It is worth experimenting with.

Well, it certainly looks to be pretty durable on the rails, although I wonder how difficult cleaning the rail-tops might be.

As for the ties, that "sun-created" bleeding creosote is a very good representation of what happens to real wooden ties.

Wayne

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