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Nasty water

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  • Member since
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Nasty water
Posted by hbgatsf on Monday, March 15, 2021 9:54 PM

I am going to have a spot where runoff water from an industrial complex can collect.  What colors should I use to represent this kind of water?

I can play around with mixing craft paints for this small area but where to start?  I was thinking of starting with something like graphite and adding some brown and/or dark green.

Rick

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Posted by SD70Dude on Monday, March 15, 2021 11:08 PM

If it's going to be stagnant water you would get a lot of plant growth and then decomposition of organic material.  Brown or very dark green would be a good colour to aim for, with plenty of weeds sticking up out of it. 

You could hide a rotten egg inside an adjacent building if you want to replicate the smell......

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Posted by Pruitt on Monday, March 15, 2021 11:10 PM

How about glow-in-the-dark purple?

Really, you can use a rainbow of colors, depending on the pollutant. A common pollution color is a somewhat bright orange, like fresh rust.

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Posted by SeeYou190 on Monday, March 15, 2021 11:47 PM

I did this on a small pond once.

I mixed up Envirotex for the water, and added some used thinner to the area by the runoff pipe after the Envirotex was poured. I streaked the used thinner into the Envirotex with a toothpick.

The used thinner was perfect, but of course, the color was a 100% random sort of purple/brown.

I wish I had a picture, but this was before digital cameras.

You need to keep an eye out for illegal dumping on your layouts!

-Kevin

Wink Happily modeling my STRATTON & GILLETTE RAILROAD. A Class A line located in a personal fantasy world of semi-plausible nonsense on Tuesday, August 3rd, 1954.

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Posted by NorthBrit on Tuesday, March 16, 2021 5:09 AM

When I did  rainfall  and puddles on my Clarence Dock section on my layout, I  dripped matt varnish around the area.    Then placing thin plastic where puddles were  and scattering crushed real coal around  (that had been spilled from coal wagons)  to give the effect required.

 

 

David

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Posted by hbgatsf on Tuesday, March 16, 2021 6:39 AM

Pruitt

Really, you can use a rainbow of colors, depending on the pollutant. A common pollution color is a somewhat bright orange, like fresh rust.

I was thinking more along the lines of the rivers around Pittsburgh before they were cleaned up, or the river in Cleveland that caught on fire.  I don't have pictures of those but I am thinking it must have been something like used motor oil.

Rick

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Posted by kasskaboose on Tuesday, March 16, 2021 8:22 AM

I would think the color of runoff depends on a few factors: the industry, location, time period, etc.  

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Posted by hbgatsf on Tuesday, March 16, 2021 8:32 AM

Pruitt

How about glow-in-the-dark purple?

I did an image search for "polluted river."  I found just about every color, including purple.  Well, sort of purple.


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Posted by C&OCheviot on Tuesday, March 16, 2021 8:40 AM

Then placing thin plastic where puddles were 

David, your puddles look good, can you explain the thin plastic. 

thanks, 

Randy

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Posted by rrinker on Tuesday, March 16, 2021 8:52 AM

 Purple water means hexavalent chromium. So if you have some industry using stuff like zinc chromate primers, or chrome plating things, or even a tannery, some purple water is possible.

                                      --Randy

 


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Posted by NorthBrit on Tuesday, March 16, 2021 9:53 AM

Hi Randy.   I know there are various ways to make puddles.  I just copied of P.D. Hancock  of 'Craig  and Mertonford'  fame.  He wrote his procedure of making puddles in his book .

The thin plastic I use is what we get in a card kit to make windows.  Very thin, clear and bendy.  Cut a piece to a size  slightly larger than required.  Glue around the edges and place over the varnish.   Once set, cover around the edges with  the ground cover you are using.   

 

I covered the edges with tiny pieces of real coal  appropriate to the area.   You use what is appropriate to your layout.

 

Although it took two goes to 'get it right' (imo),  it really is easy to do.    If you are doing a 'after the rainfall'   just paint the roads and pathways with varnish.   Some areas will look drier than others.  Great!   'The sun is out, but doesn't dry everything at once'  look.    It certainly is different to a sunny, Summer's day we all do.  Smile

 

Hope that helps.

 

David

 

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Posted by SeeYou190 on Tuesday, March 16, 2021 10:47 AM

hbgatsf
The river in Cleveland that caught on fire.

The Cuyahoga River has caught on fire more than once. This was one of those things we studied a lot when I was young because it was so unbelievable.

The fire(s) on the Cuyahoga were different from other river fires. In most river fires it is the floating oils on the river that cause a surface fire, and that is pretty common.

What we were taught about the Cuyahoga river is that the flammables were actually dissolved, and not floating on the surface. This made the river actually flammable, the water would catch on fire.

Some reports said this pollution was not readily visible.

To see the Cuyahoga now, it is a National Park, the restoration is amazing.

-Kevin

Wink Happily modeling my STRATTON & GILLETTE RAILROAD. A Class A line located in a personal fantasy world of semi-plausible nonsense on Tuesday, August 3rd, 1954.

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Posted by gmpullman on Tuesday, March 16, 2021 1:42 PM

A few interesting tidbits about the Cuyahoga River fires.

No one really paid much attention to the June 22, 1969 fire that was the focal point of much of the discussion. In fact the press didn't show up until the fire was out and no photos are known to exist of that incident.

Time magazine ran a feature on polluted rivers and cited the 1969 fire as a cause for action. Since there were no photos of the '69 fire they dug through the files and found a photo of a rather extensive 1952 fire. This is the photo that garnered all the attention. (The same issue also featured a moon landing and a car driven off a bridge)

The 1969 fire was actually triggered by sticking brakes on a Newburgh & South Shore freight, which caught the bridge on fire. Since there was a pile of oil-soaked flotsam at the pilings of the bridge it then appeared the river was on fire.

Some discussion here:

https://www.smithsonianmag.com/history/cuyahoga-river-caught-fire-least-dozen-times-no-one-cared-until-1969-180972444/

I've had the pleasure of riding along on the Cleveland F.D. fireboat Anthony J. Celebreeze on several occasions. I'll have to dig out those films and get them posted to YouTube... someday Whistling

This is my effluent runoff from the nearby roundhouse:

 RH_Culvert by Edmund, on Flickr

A few dead trees and some tires stuck in the water helps to give the impression of being water which isn't exactly environmentally friendly.

Cheers, Ed

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Posted by hornblower on Tuesday, March 16, 2021 1:45 PM

Years ago, I tried to fill an open top water tank with Woodland Scenics Realistic Water.  What I got looked like the nastiest water you could ever imagine.  I had painted the inside of the empty tank a dark grey.  The WS water seemed to suck the paint color into itself until it was completely opaque.  The WS water never completely hardened and any dust or other objects would be absorbed into the muck over time, even years after I made the pour.  Shades of the La Brea Tar Pits in California.  

Hornblower

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Posted by maxman on Tuesday, March 16, 2021 5:04 PM

In Chicago they use green dye.

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Posted by BigDaddy on Tuesday, March 16, 2021 5:33 PM

This isn't industrial, but it's silt and no silt.  The upper color is olive drab.

Henry

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Posted by HO-Velo on Tuesday, March 16, 2021 8:59 PM

Wanted a brackish look to my industrial area canal, plaster bottom was painted a muddy brown darkening the shade towards the middle.  'Water' is Envirotex with some green & brown dye added.

Regards, Peter

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Posted by MisterBeasley on Friday, March 26, 2021 3:24 PM

This pond is next to my tannery.  The colors are acrylics, using rusty base coloring before adding Envirotex.

This is a swamp.  Here, it's greens and browns.  For the top layer of Envirotex, I mix and pour it clear but them apply colors to the setting Envirotex with a pin, so the effect is not continuous.

This is the old mill canal.  It's a better example of applying a tiny bit of paint with a pin. Yes, someone tossed a bicycle and a shopping cart in there, too.

 

 

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Posted by Colorado_Mac on Monday, March 29, 2021 7:58 PM

To my eye, Peter's ditch looks spot-on.
Years ago, flying out of the Middle East, we passed over an industry with a collection pond that was neon pink.  couldn't make out what the industry was (not oil). Cotton candy factory, maybe. 

Sean

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Posted by HO-Velo on Monday, March 29, 2021 10:15 PM

Thanks Sean.  Hmm, if not cotton candy, maybe a pepto-release.

Regards, Peter

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Posted by kasskaboose on Tuesday, March 30, 2021 4:06 PM

Colorado_Mac

To my eye, Peter's ditch looks spot-on.
Years ago, flying out of the Middle East, we passed over an industry with a collection pond that was neon pink.  couldn't make out what the industry was (not oil). Cotton candy factory, maybe. 

 

Apparently, pink-colored industrial waste has happened in India:

https://www.ndtv.com/delhi-news/pink-foam-flowing-in-the-yamuna-is-toxic-industrial-waste-1290859

 

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Posted by hbgatsf on Saturday, April 3, 2021 10:23 AM

HO-Velo

Wanted a brackish look to my industrial area canal, plaster bottom was painted a muddy brown darkening the shade towards the middle.  'Water' is Envirotex with some green & brown dye added.

Regards, Peter

 

I agree with the others - that looks great.  How do you pull off darkening towards the middle?  Also, what type of dye is added to the Envirotex?

BTW - all the examples look good.  Something like Peter's is what I had in mind, maybe with a tad of black.

Rick

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Posted by NVSRR on Saturday, April 3, 2021 12:57 PM

Didnt kathy millet do a couple of videos on attempts to create pollution filled water ways?

 

shane

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Posted by HO-Velo on Saturday, April 3, 2021 5:17 PM

hbgatsf
darkening towards the middle?  Also, what type of dye is added to the Envirotex?

Thanks Rick.  Gosh, doesn't seem like 5 yrs has passed since doing my waterway.  Wish I was better at keeping notes.

Bottom & banks brush painted with a mix of brown latex paints, feathering is not my forte, but did my best with a dark shade of brown along the middle and spreading outwards some.  While paint still wet sifted on some brownish mixed rock powders for added texture.

Sorry, shouldn't have said dye, the stuff used to tint the Envirotex was Castin' Craft Color Pigment, brown & green.  Never tried, but heard that model paint works too. 

Did a few 20ml test pours at the workbench, didn't take but a few drops of the pigments, more brown than green.  Using the same ratio of pigments to epoxy at 20ml and multiplying for the main pour produced a darker and more opaque look than the test pieces.  At first it was like, "Oh no, what have I done!"  Gonna guess that lighting temp. also plays a part, but luck was with me and turned out to be better than the test piece in looks and color.

Regards, Peter

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Posted by maxman on Saturday, April 3, 2021 7:43 PM

HO-Velo

Wanted a brackish look to my industrial area canal, plaster bottom was painted a muddy brown darkening the shade towards the middle.  'Water' is Envirotex with some green & brown dye added.

Regards, Peter

 

Yes, this looks great.

How was the flow out the end of the pipe done?

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Posted by HO-Velo on Monday, April 5, 2021 12:26 PM

maxman
flow out the end of the pipe

Thanks maxman.  Used Woodland Scenics Water Effects, watched their vid. before laying down some thin patches onto waxed paper, played and teased them out.  Next day dry brushed some white paint onto the best looking piece.  After paint dried removed the candidate from the wax paper and cut to size leaving enough to extend back into the pipe a bit.   Modeling Waterfalls - Woodland Scenics

Regards, Peter

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