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How do you mount your layout Fascia?

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  • Member since
    July 2006
  • From: Boise, Idaho
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How do you mount your layout Fascia?
Posted by E-L man tom on Monday, October 12, 2020 2:19 PM

Well, about to get trains running on my Ohio Valley & Northern Railroad. The next step will involve installing a fascia along the front edge.

Question is:  What is the best way to mount the fascia? I'm using 1/8" hardboard and it will be 8" deep (from top edge to bottom). I thought of using 'L' shaped brackets, the outer leg of which the fascia board would be screwed to. I also thought of maybe using lengths of 2" x 4" mounted flush with the benchwork edge. What has anyone used to mount their fascia? Any help would be useful. Thanks.

Tom Modeling the free-lanced Toledo Erie Central switching layout.
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  • From: Wyoming, where men are men, and sheep are nervous!
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Posted by Pruitt on Monday, October 12, 2020 5:50 PM

I used wood screws and finishing washers.

Before fascia:

After fascia install: 

The fascia attaches to stringers where I have them, and to joist ends where there are no stringers. Where needed for strength, I add a cleat at the joist end and the fascia attaches to that. 

My fascia is nominally 8" tall. The stringers and joists are 3" tall. The extra fascia length is not attached to anything.

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Posted by BigDaddy on Monday, October 12, 2020 7:55 PM

In my first layout, L-girder I used cleats on the joists.

The current layout is foam, on plywood benchwork.  I am undecided.  Ken Patterson uses 1/8" plywood for fascia.  He also uses several inches of foam (4" or more).  He routes out a groove in the foam, uses gorilla glue to implant a vertical wood strip 1x1? in the foam and then screws it to the wood.

I wonder how Mark filled in the space on the left side of his layout between the end of the joists and the track?

Henry

COB Potomac & Northern

By the Chesapeake Bay

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Posted by doctorwayne on Monday, October 12, 2020 9:51 PM

E-L man tom
What is the best way to mount the fascia?

Here's a fairly recent thread discussing this same topic.

Wayne

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Posted by rrebell on Monday, October 12, 2020 11:58 PM

I attached mine with a brad nailer, worked great.

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  • From: Boise, Idaho
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Posted by E-L man tom on Tuesday, October 13, 2020 9:01 AM

To clarify:  I don't have a problem with what screws/nails/tools to use. What I need to know is what do I use to attach the 1/8" hardboard to on the benchwork. I'm using 1/2" birch plywood for the bench surface and my benchwork construction is L-girder. The girders are 10-14" in from the edge of the layout and the joists are cantelevered out to the edge. I took Lynn Wescott's advice and cut about a 45 degree piece out of the corners of the bottoms of the joist ends so I wouldn't smack my head on a joist corner while working under the layout (so glad I did that!).

What I need to know is: what kind of "anchor" should I use to attach the hardboard to?  Thanks.   

Tom Modeling the free-lanced Toledo Erie Central switching layout.
  • Member since
    February 2001
  • From: Wyoming, where men are men, and sheep are nervous!
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Posted by Pruitt on Tuesday, October 13, 2020 10:04 AM

BigDaddy
I wonder how Mark filled in the space on the left side of his layout between the end of the joists and the track?

You mean me? I just laid foam sheets between the fascia and the track. Scenery would go on top of that (never got to that point, because I moved and my new layout isn't ready for scenery yet).

Here's a sample of what I mean:

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Posted by BATMAN on Tuesday, October 13, 2020 10:27 AM

I am considering industrial velcro. It is really sticky and bonds to wood well and the velcro holds hardboard really well.

Brent

It's not the age honey, it's the mileage.

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Posted by snjroy on Tuesday, October 13, 2020 12:22 PM

(removed)

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Posted by hardcoalcase on Tuesday, October 13, 2020 9:25 PM

E-L man tom

The girders are 10-14" in from the edge of the layout and the joists are cantelevered out to the edge. 

What I need to know is: what kind of "anchor" should I use to attach the hardboard to?  Thanks.   

Given the location of the subroadbed and track, I make a determination as to how far the joists should extend out to the asile from the L-grider - i.e. where the fascia will be.  Then I cut the joist end about an inch short of that, and clamp on a "joist extension piece" with the asile end cut at an angle which is about how the hardboard will interface with the joist.  After I test fit the position of the fascia, checking for plumb, I'll screw the extention to the joist - thats the anchor.  Next I'll screw the hardboard to the end of the extension with counter-sunk screws.  My fascia is about 12" tall and the two screws into the end of the 1 x 4 joist end is more than sufficient to hold it in place.  Keep in mind that if the hardboard fascia is curved, that adds to its rigidity.

Generally, the top of the fascia follows the subroadbed, and in this case, I also glue a small piece of 3/4" plywood (my basic benchwork material) to the bottom outer edge of the subroadbed and attach the top end of the hardboard to it with a counter-sunk screw. 

Jim

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