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size of styrene

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size of styrene
Posted by crisco1 on Wednesday, February 26, 2020 1:59 PM

  What size styrene would you use to fill in a gap?

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Posted by Medina1128 on Wednesday, February 26, 2020 2:20 PM

It really depends on the width of the gap. I'd find either square our round rod slightly larger than the gap. Starting at one end, apply liquid glue. This will soften the rod to the point that you can work it into the gap. Keep applying glue as you work the rod into the gap. When the glue has completely dried (hard), you'll be able to sand it to blend it into the adjacent areas.
Or, you can use a slightly smaller rod, then fill the smaller gap with squadron putty. After everything has set up, then sand to blend.

White squadron putty

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Posted by mbinsewi on Wednesday, February 26, 2020 2:45 PM

I love questions that are loaded with information.  Indifferent  Makes answering questions and providing help and ideas sooooooo much easier.

Mike.

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Posted by RR_Mel on Wednesday, February 26, 2020 2:51 PM

I’m assuming you are speaking of small openings.  I use .02” & .03” Styrene rods dipped into Testors Liquid Cement, it is like soldering or brazing with Styrene.
 
 
 
Mel
 
 
 
My Model Railroad   
 
Bakersfield, California
 
I'm beginning to realize that aging is not for wimps.
 
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Posted by dknelson on Wednesday, February 26, 2020 4:14 PM

Given that this is a layout and layout building part of the Forum I assume you mean, what thickness of styrene to close a gap that has been cut in rails for insulation purposes, such as a block.  No magic thickness but it is easier to work with if it isn't tissue paper thin.  About the thickness of a light cardstock, such as a manila folder or 3x5 card, so that it can be cemented into the gap and then carefully cut to match the rail head profile.  .010" should do.

If that isn't your question, then I guess that isn't the answer.  Drinks

Dave Nelson

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Posted by richhotrain on Wednesday, February 26, 2020 4:17 PM

mbinsewi

I love questions that are loaded with information.  Indifferent  Makes answering questions and providing help and ideas sooooooo much easier.

Mike. 

LOL

Two questions for crisco1. One, how wide and long is the gap? Two, what material forms the gap, styrene, wood, plaster?

Rich

Alton Junction

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Posted by hon30critter on Wednesday, February 26, 2020 6:18 PM

crisco1
What size styrene would you use to fill in a gap?

 

What size gap?

Sorry crisco1, I couldn't resist. Unfortunately my mind reading skills aren't what they used to be. Perhaps you could elaborate a bit more.

Dave

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Posted by doctorwayne on Wednesday, February 26, 2020 7:28 PM

crisco1

  What size styrene would you use to fill in a gap?

 

 
A gap-sized piece would probably fit quite well.  You should be able to find one at any gap-filler store
 
Wayne
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Posted by SeeYou190 on Wednesday, February 26, 2020 11:19 PM

crisco1
What size styrene would you use to fill in a gap?

Well, I would use a piece of styrene that fits that gap with a clearance of 0.000" to 0.003" and then shape it to match the contour of the surround model.

It sounds like you have a gap that needs to be filled... Lets get to work on that.

This is a difficult situation to resolve because there are just so many unpredictable variables that will effect the choice of the best filler size to use for each individual gap you will encounter. Since I cannot see your gap, I will do my best to move this towards a solution.

I hope you have a good supply of various sizes of styrene on hand. When it comes to filling gaps you will need a well stocked supply or you will be making an awful lot of trips to your friendly local hobby shop.

You first need to purchase a Mitutoyo brand (or comperable quality) dial caliper graduated in 0.001" increments. Mine is 6" working length, but if your gap is wider than 6.000" you will need a larger caliper.

Use the inside measurement teeth (Blue Circle) to measure the width of the gap.

If you cut the gap with a saw, there is an alternative way to use the caliper to determine the filler size to use. Use the outside measurement teeth (Red Circle) to measure the width of the saw blade. Be sure to measure across the kerf offset of the teeth or your styrene filler will not be thick enough.

If it is a very narrow gap, an alternative to figure out what size styrene to use would be to use a set of feeler gauges. This set of Snap-On "go/no-go" gauges are the most accurate. The red circle shows one blade marked 0.014"/0.016". If the 0.014" portion of the blade will pass through the gap, but the 0.016" will not, then you know you will need a 0.015" piece of styrene plastic to fill that gap.

If your gap is less than 0.100", you can cut an appropriate filler piece from dimensional styrene strip from Evergreen. If your gap is wider than 0.100", you will need to cut a piece of styrene plastic to length to fill the gap.

If the gap you are filling is in styrene, you can glue the filler in place with Testors Liquid Cement For Plastic Models.

If the gap is in another material, any sort of "CA" or instant cement should work well enough.

It is important to properly shape the filler to match the material that had the gap in it. I prefer to use flexible sanding pads from Squadron Products for this step. I can achieve accepatable results without too much effort with these excellent products.

These Detail Sanding Sticks that are available from Northwest Short Line can also be usefule for shaping the gap.

The Seam Scriber from Micro-Mark is also a useful tool for shaping the styrene filler piece.

For extremely small gaps, I prefer to use "stretched sprue" and Testors Liquid Cement For Plastic Models to fill the gap. If you use this technique be sure to allow five days before sanding to allow the styrene to fully harden.

Now you will need to finish the gap prior to painting. I like to use Bondo Spot Filler, but I know a lot of modellers swear by Squadron Putty. They both work about the same.

For a super fine filler, you could consider using Surfacer 500 or Surfacer 1000 from Mr. Hobby. These are incredible for filling small surface imperfectrions and can work better than styrene filler pieces. these can also be worked to an amazingly smooth final finish.

I have also used Milliput brand two part Yellow/Grey as a filler. It makes a nice fine grain sandable surface.

Another option is to not use styrene to fill the gap at all, but use a piece of Kneadatite Blue/Yellow epoxy putty. This is very workable and easy to sculpt.

You can fill any gap of any shape with Kneadatitie and some simple sculpting tools. The "Sculpting Tool" from Citadel is an excellent choice for your first one. As you can see, mine is very well used.

Prime everything with Tamiya Fine Gray Primer prior to painting.

I know I left a lot of important information out of this reply to answer all the other questions you must have, but I have packed away a lot of my modeling tools and cannot post enough example pictures right now.

I hope this helped at least a little. If you still have questions, please ask them and maybe someone can provide you with a better answer.

-Kevin

Wink Happily modeling my STRATTON & GILLETTE RAILROAD. A Class A line located in a personal fantasy world of semi-plausible nonsense on Tuesday, August 3rd, 1954.

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Posted by mbinsewi on Thursday, February 27, 2020 6:21 AM

Geesss .....Laugh.....Kevin, the Gap Master!  Laugh

Jes' funnin'  Smile, Wink & Grin

Mike.

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Posted by BigDaddy on Thursday, February 27, 2020 8:18 AM

I had no ideal feeler gauges were a MR tool.

Henry

COB Potomac & Northern

By the Chesapeake Bay

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Posted by kasskaboose on Thursday, February 27, 2020 9:31 AM

Can we please get less specific?

Would love to help but are we talking gaps in track, in buildings, where?

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Posted by doctorwayne on Thursday, February 27, 2020 11:52 AM

kasskaboose
Can we please get less specific?...

I dunno, the original question was about as unspecific as a question could be....

...is it a missing tooth, a gap in one's memory, a gap in their employment history, or simply a gap in the information of the original query?

Wayne

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Posted by jjdamnit on Thursday, February 27, 2020 1:02 PM

Hello All,

A slightly smaller piece than the gap to allow for adhesive. Wink

Hope this helps.

"Uhh...I didn’t know it was 'impossible' I just made it work...sorry"

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Posted by jjdamnit on Thursday, February 27, 2020 1:03 PM

Hello All,

BigDaddy
I had no ideal feeler gauges were a MR tool.

Only the left-handed ones. The right-handed ones are on the wrong side.

Hope this helps.

"Uhh...I didn’t know it was 'impossible' I just made it work...sorry"

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Posted by SeeYou190 on Thursday, February 27, 2020 9:18 PM

mbinsewi
Kevin, the Gap Master!

I really hope that does not become my nick-name!

-Kevin

Wink Happily modeling my STRATTON & GILLETTE RAILROAD. A Class A line located in a personal fantasy world of semi-plausible nonsense on Tuesday, August 3rd, 1954.

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Posted by hon30critter on Thursday, February 27, 2020 11:05 PM

jjdamnit
Only the left-handed ones. The right-handed ones are on the wrong side.

Not if you stand upside down!

Sorry, couldn't resist! Smile, Wink & GrinLaughLaughLaugh

Where is the OP? I hope we haven't offended him (her).

Dave

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Posted by jjdamnit on Friday, March 6, 2020 1:02 PM

Hello All,

hon30critter
Not if you stand upside down!

Or are in AustraliaWink

Hope this helps.

 

"Uhh...I didn’t know it was 'impossible' I just made it work...sorry"

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Posted by riogrande5761 on Friday, March 6, 2020 1:30 PM

Agree.  It feels almost a bit like "click bait" because you gotta click on it to found out what its all about.

My theory is, whether consciously or unconscouly, people make vague titles try to get more people to click on their topic.  Bang Head

Rio Grande.  The Action Road  - Focus 1977-1983

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