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Atlas HO code 100 paper track sections?

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Atlas HO code 100 paper track sections?
Posted by Wdodge0912 on Wednesday, February 26, 2020 4:53 AM

I was wondering if there was a collection somewhere of paper track peices that I could print out, so I can lay out my layout before laying track. I have a lot of HO Atlas Code 100, so that's what I'd be looking for.

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Posted by mbinsewi on Wednesday, February 26, 2020 7:16 AM

Do a search, there are plenty of options.  Atlas has track planning templates, along with other sources.

Mike.

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Posted by wvg_ca on Wednesday, February 26, 2020 9:02 AM

and here I thought you wanted information on Atlas code 100 that used pressed paper / fibre for the ties, and staples to hold it on ...

those are getting to be 'vintage' items, lol

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Posted by BigDaddy on Wednesday, February 26, 2020 9:12 AM

Henry

COB Potomac & Northern

By the Chesapeake Bay

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Posted by mbinsewi on Wednesday, February 26, 2020 9:47 AM

And wouldn't you know, they're on back order. Indifferent

Mike.

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Posted by trevorsmith3489 on Wednesday, February 26, 2020 10:38 AM

Why not place your track pieces on a photocopier or use the "copy" function of a home printer to make your own?

Trevor 

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Posted by Stevert on Wednesday, February 26, 2020 10:39 AM

Another option, to avoid using up all those trees, would be the Atlas Track Planning Software:

https://shop.atlasrr.com/t-software.aspx

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Posted by riogrande5761 on Wednesday, February 26, 2020 10:41 AM

You could aways buy some Altas turnouts if you are going to use them anyway and simply test fit with the real thing and save a tree!  or a twig!  Idea

I just used the real thing to figure out what fit where using centerlines and real turnouts.

Turned out fine:

 

Rio Grande.  The Action Road  - Focus 1977-1983

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Posted by mbinsewi on Wednesday, February 26, 2020 10:43 AM

Wdodge0912
I have a lot of HO Atlas Code 100,

I didn't see that before...Indifferent...which is NOT unusal for me. Smile, Wink & Grin

Trevor has a good idea, make your own.

Mike.

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Posted by hon30critter on Wednesday, February 26, 2020 9:40 PM

I would offer one small caution about using a copier to print track pieces. Make sure that your copier is copying at 100%. In other words, check the copies against the real thing to make sure that they are exactly the same size. Not all copiers print at exactly the same size as the original.

Peco has turnout diagrams as well, and each picture includes a ruler so you can check to see if the copy is the right size. All you have to do is put an actual ruler beside the printed ruler to see if they match up.

If the copies don't match you should be able to scale the drawings with the printer settings.

Dave

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Posted by ATLANTIC CENTRAL on Thursday, February 27, 2020 10:37 AM

Stevert

Another option, to avoid using up all those trees, would be the Atlas Track Planning Software:

https://shop.atlasrr.com/t-software.aspx

 

You may want to un drink that koolaid when you realize the tree huggers have been lieing to you all these years. Trees are virtually never cut down just to make paper.

Paper is largely made from what is left over after they make lumber, plywood, osb board, etc etc.

And for over 100 years paper has been recycled at the industrial level. The printing and paper industries return all their trimmings and waste to the mill to be recycled.

I am a draftsman by original training and have used CADD, I hate it.

My layout plans are drawn the old way, but not on paper, on mylar.......

Computers are great, but paper still has its place. I can read my old Model Railroader magazines without using any of the pesky electricity that around here is mostly generated by burning coal.......or, without wearing out any batteries that will end up in a land fill.

I bet my carbon footprint is less than yours.......

Why did I write this reply? We can do without the political/social commentary, we are here to talk trains.

Sheldon

    

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Posted by Wdodge0912 on Saturday, February 29, 2020 7:08 AM

I was hoping to find something I could print. I suppose I could but the template and make copies of that. I'd do the copying of the track, but I'd like to have a crossing somewhere and dont own any. Also I only have #4 turnouts and was thinking maybe of using #6 somewhere if I can fit it

 

I have used Atlas's free software, the Right Track software. I'm pretty good with it I think, except for using turnouts that arent snap switches. I dont know how to get them back to a straight to parallel a track for instance. You can't lay a peice of flex without 2 points already being placed, and I'm unsure what the combination is, if there is one, to have the switch run back to a square angle

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Posted by danno54 on Saturday, February 29, 2020 8:06 AM
Good point! Copiers usually have a border as default and image is shrunk to fit inside border.
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Posted by NittanyLion on Saturday, February 29, 2020 11:27 AM

ATLANTIC CENTRAL
You may want to un drink that koolaid when you realize the tree huggers have been lieing to you all these years. Trees are virtually never cut down just to make paper.

 

My in-laws, who paid for the wedding by having some of their South Georgia pines cut down, tell me a somewhat more complicated version: the trees too small for timber get shipped off to the paper mills.

When they sell off timber, there's a three phased approach that involves clearing out all the pine straw (never realized how much money is in that), clearing out the undergrowth and the saplings that become paper, and then the trees come down to head off to the plywood factory. 

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Posted by ATLANTIC CENTRAL on Saturday, February 29, 2020 1:29 PM

NittanyLion

 

 
ATLANTIC CENTRAL
You may want to un drink that koolaid when you realize the tree huggers have been lieing to you all these years. Trees are virtually never cut down just to make paper.

 

 

 

My in-laws, who paid for the wedding by having some of their South Georgia pines cut down, tell me a somewhat more complicated version: the trees too small for timber get shipped off to the paper mills.

When they sell off timber, there's a three phased approach that involves clearing out all the pine straw (never realized how much money is in that), clearing out the undergrowth and the saplings that become paper, and then the trees come down to head off to the plywood factory. 

 

Yes, it is more complicated, but it is part of carefully managed resource use and planning, not the willy nilly cuting down of trees some environmental extremists would have you believe.

The point is most all wood based products come from carefully managed and replanted forests, and using less paper is not going to change that fact or that formula, or "save any trees".

They are going to clear cut that forest and replant it no matter what.

Question everyone should know the answer to, which continent has the highest percentage of its natural forest cover intact? - yes, North America.

We are beyond responsable with our forest resources, so yes, I am put off by the "save a tree" comment.

Sheldon 

    

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Posted by Doughless on Saturday, February 29, 2020 1:46 PM

riogrande5761

You could aways buy some Altas turnouts if you are going to use them anyway and simply test fit with the real thing and save a tree!  or a twig!  Idea

I just used the real thing to figure out what fit where using centerlines and real turnouts.

Turned out fine:

 

 

On a flat table top escpecially, which is what most of my layouts have been, this is exactly the way I track plan.

As much as I like to look at illustrations of plans and even participate in track planning threads, I hardly ever bother making a serious drawing ahead of time.

If OP is settled on the brand of turnouts and track, he could buy some a head of time and plan by shifting them around.  Works best if he's planning for a table top layout however.

- Douglas

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Posted by Wdodge0912 on Sunday, March 1, 2020 3:50 AM

I'm not here to discuss politics of tree management or paper production. 

 

One reason I'd like to have paper track templates over using actual track, is to know what I need to buy. I have a ton of the 9" long straight peices and 18" curves, and a few #4 switches and 22" curves. That's what I'll be using. But I have no crosses, nor any other switch but the #4s. I'd rather not go out and buy a bunch of track peices like switches, especially since they cost a bit, or crosses, before knowing what I'd need first. I could and probably would end up with track peices I didn't or couldn't use on the layout. If I had a paper template, I could tape down what I wanted for a layout and them go buy what I didn't have.

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Posted by mbinsewi on Sunday, March 1, 2020 7:08 AM

The #6 turnout would also be a good template to have.  I didn't scroll back, but didn't you mention you were using the Atlas track planner?

Are there any dimension on there?  I've never used it.  I always have, and will, do track planning with paper and drawing tools.

Here's a thread, from not too long ago, and Mel posts a picture of a #6, with dimensions.

http://cs.trains.com/mrr/f/11/t/261210.aspx

If the Atlas thing doesn't give you what you need, there are other free programs.  The thread I just posted has some ideas.

Mike.

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Posted by Wdodge0912 on Tuesday, March 3, 2020 12:20 AM

Yea. I'm using the RTS v8.0 from them. It's a freeware program. I'm not very good at it though when it comes to using turnouts other than the snap switches. I cant figure out how to make the tracks straight again using the other switches, without taking up huge amounts of room otherwise, or having a turnout without track leading off of the straight through side. Or really getting any kind of crossing to work without some weird S shaped flex track section, and them that still takes up a lot of room when I do it.

 

That's one reason why I want to do paper, is the turnouts, but I only have #4s. Was hoping to get templates of other turnout s and crosses, so I can come up with the layout, and then buy what I don't have.

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