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Where to find information?

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Where to find information?
Posted by Trainzman2435 on Saturday, January 11, 2020 10:41 AM

Hello everyone, i have been looking through past topics and searching the interweb for information on how to go about adding a seperate level of elevation to my pretty much flat layout. I know a lot of people use extruded styrofoam sheeting and stuff like that but can anyone recommend a good source for someone like me who is a newbie on different elevations so that i may better understand the concept and process of it? Many thanks guys!

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Posted by UNCLEBUTCH on Saturday, January 11, 2020 10:59 AM

Trainzman2435
the concept and process of it

 I think your ''over thinking'' it. There's a ton of books out there,most I find are useless, there is more then a ton of stuff on u tube.

The concept;  you have a flat suface, build a hill,dig a ditch, to break up the flatness.

the process; way too many to list here.

the hardest part is to start, almost inpossible to screw it up, you will get better as you go.

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Posted by BigDaddy on Saturday, January 11, 2020 11:25 AM

Is this track elevation as in grades, possibly one train passing over another or are you asking about landscaping? 

Henry

COB Potomac & Northern

By the Chesapeake Bay

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Posted by SeeYou190 on Saturday, January 11, 2020 12:42 PM

I think a better description of what you are wanting to do will help us give you a better answer.

.

-Kevin

.

Wink Happily modeling my STRATTON & GILLETTE RAILROAD. A Class A line located in a personal fantasy world of semi-plausible nonsense on Tuesday, August 3rd, 1954.

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Posted by doctorwayne on Saturday, January 11, 2020 2:08 PM

Trainzman2435
...I know a lot of people use extruded styrofoam sheeting and stuff like that but can anyone recommend a good source for someone like me who is a newbie on different elevations so that i may better understand the concept and process of it?...

Well, there's not really too much to it, and you've pretty-well described it with what's quoted above: 

Get some foam, cut it to a size suitable to where you want some higher elevation, perhaps shape its contours a bit, using a Surform, then put it where you want some higher ground.

Another option, if your layout is a tabletop of plywood, is to add some blocks of wood  to it, then staple aluminum window screen over it.  Get some Durabond patching plaster, and follow the instructions on the package to cover the screen. 

If your layout is open grid, like mine, simply add some risers, as shown in the photo below, then staple the screen over it, and apply the plaster.  This area is obviously unfinished, but illustrates the risers and plaster-on-screen construction.

This view shows some of the screening, and where the track dead-ends on the upper area, the rolling hills were supported by temporary risers clamped to the open grid.  Once the plaster hardened, the risers were removed for use elsewhere.

Once you've added elevation wherever you wanted it, paint it to look like something other than foam or plaster, then check out Woodland Scenics' line of material for creating realistic-looking scenery.

Wayne

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Posted by Trainzman2435 on Saturday, January 11, 2020 2:48 PM

BigDaddy

Is this track elevation as in grades, possibly one train passing over another or are you asking about landscaping? 

 

Henry, i am speaking of one track passing over another or vice versa. My layout now is open grid benchwork with .75" plywood top and 2" pink extruded foam on top of the plywood. My track plan so far is flat or level but i had planned on haveing various elevations including one track passing over another. Randy on here had suggested it based on my track plan which i will include in this post. Basically all i am wanting to do is create a different elevation for part of my track using foam risers and extruded foam board but i am just not sure how or where to begin and where to end lol....If that makes any sense. Thanks everyone!

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Posted by gmpullman on Saturday, January 11, 2020 6:27 PM

Trainzman2435
Hello everyone, i have been looking through past topics and searching the interweb for information on how to go about adding a seperate level of elevation to my pretty much flat layout.

Have you looked at the helpful "clinics" provided by M-R in the top menu header on this very page?

http://mrr.trains.com/how-to/build-model-railroad

http://mrr.trains.com/track-planning-operation#8

 

There is some good, basic information there. Be sure to explore it all.

Good Luck, Ed

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Posted by kasskaboose on Thursday, January 16, 2020 9:04 AM

Plenty of options available.  Way too many to mention here.  Have you considered what type of elevations you looking to show (i.e. steep mountains, rolling hills, etc.)? 

One thing I use is foam glued together, cut apart length-wise to create elevation and then scenicked.  Nothing too complex.  The goal is variety and realism!

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Posted by BATMAN on Friday, January 17, 2020 3:15 PM

I used spline to change elevation. 

 

I then used foam and other methods to build the terrain up.

 

 

 

Brent

It's not the age honey, it's the mileage.

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Posted by BATMAN on Friday, January 17, 2020 3:21 PM

I like this old series on working with extruded foam, it got me this when I was starting out.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FiCSW3Pn5gw 

Brent

It's not the age honey, it's the mileage.

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Posted by The Milwaukee Road Warrior on Saturday, January 18, 2020 4:34 PM

I posted on this thread earlier but it appears to have gone off into the void...

John Armstrong's fantastic book "Track Planning for Realistic Operation, Third Edition" is also a great source for information on grades/elevations and "crossovers" - usually called "flyovers" on prototype railroads.  The book has a great photo I'm thinking of from the Penn RR in the 40s.

It also has various tables and charts for figuring out elevations irregardless of the scale you are modeling.

As close to a Bible as it gets for rail modelers.

https://www.amazon.com/Track-Planning-Realistic-Operation-Railroader/dp/0890242275/ref=sr_1_1?keywords=john+armstrong+realistic+model&qid=1579386560&sr=8-1

 

Andy

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Milwaukee native modeling the Milwaukee Road in 1950's Milwaukee.

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