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HO layout in connected boxes

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HO layout in connected boxes
Posted by CNW Lover on Monday, October 14, 2019 6:55 PM

This weekend I attended a train show and one of the displays consisted of individual wooden boxes connected together.  The boxes had arches cut into the bottom fronts of both sides for the track to go through to the next box.  Each box had a different scene.  Does anyone have information about such a layout?

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Posted by PC101 on Wednesday, October 16, 2019 7:43 PM

I have no infomation on what sounds like a modular layout... but maybe you could contact the people who run the show and find out some names of the Clubs or Organizations that had layouts there. Some times at the door of these events you could pick up a paper with vendors and Organizations that should be there, then track them down. What city was this show in? What scale, HO or N or? 

Sounds like from your description that with the layout in the boxs, possibility everything will be below the top edge which would make all wood box's stackable with no damage to scenery for transportation.

No frame work or shelves to build, just stack and go, like wood apple crates.

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Posted by York1 on Wednesday, October 16, 2019 7:48 PM

CNW Lover

This weekend I attended a train show and one of the displays consisted of individual wooden boxes connected together.  The boxes had arches cut into the bottom fronts of both sides for the track to go through to the next box.  Each box had a different scene.  Does anyone have information about such a layout?

 

 

I saw the same kind of set up at a show I attended.  Each box was basically a complete scene, and the sides of the boxes allowed more scenery, especially city things, than a regular module.

I can't remember where I saw them, but I will search.

Saints Fan John

Gentlemen, you can't fight in here! This is the War Room.

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Posted by SeeYou190 on Wednesday, October 16, 2019 7:55 PM

I have never seen a portable display layout like the desciption, but I would love to see some pictures.

.

-Kevin

.

Wink Happily modeling my STRATTON & GILLETTE RAILROAD. A Class A line located in a personal fantasy world of semi-plausible nonsense on Tuesday, August 3rd, 1954.

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Posted by Tinplate Toddler on Wednesday, October 16, 2019 11:06 PM

One of my never realized layout projects was a display layout for shows, built in 3 connected boxes, each depicting a different scene.

There is a lot to say for this type of layout, which, howver, requires a lot of thinking "inside the box". Smile, Wink & Grin

 

Happy times!

Ulrich (aka The Tin Man)

"You´re never too old for a happy childhood!"

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Posted by "JaBear" on Thursday, October 17, 2019 1:53 AM
I’ve seen an NZR Sn 3 ½ exhibition point to point layout using the same principles as Ulrich’s’.
 
It had a mixed reception with some ffolkes not liking the concept, but I thought it was clever as there was a matt black view block between each very different scene. To me, it was not as mentally jarring as some excellently modelled “conventional” module set ups with completely different scenes directly joined to each other.
 
My 2 Cents Cheers, the Bear.Smile

"One difference between pessimists and optimists is that while pessimists are more often right, optimists have far more fun."

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Posted by Tinplate Toddler on Thursday, October 17, 2019 2:33 AM

It had a mixed reception with some ffolkes not liking the concept, but I thought it was clever as there was a matt black view block between each very different scene.

That´s the way I envisioned to set up the layout at shows.

 

Happy times!

Ulrich (aka The Tin Man)

"You´re never too old for a happy childhood!"

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Posted by gregc on Thursday, October 17, 2019 5:53 AM

since retiring and planning on moving i'm wondering what to do about a model railroad.   i have a small pt-to-pt w/ completed trackwork with vertical staging and wondering what could be salvaged.   while helping others on their layouts, i'm seeing different approaches for building and operating layouts.

i'm thinking of making modules, maybe 6' long representing stations that are connected w/ inexpensive splined bridges.   the bridges could simply attach and be supported by modules, have legs or hang on walls.   bridges need wall(s) to prevent trains from falling.

The modules can be temporarily setup to operate the layout.    New modules can be built and existing modules reorganized, possibly occupying more than one room with a splined bridge between rooms.     and since it's somewhat temporary, can block closets or windows.  hopefully no tight curves

i'm thinking this approach can get something going quickly, expand and change to try new ideas.   A module can have more that 2 bridge connections.   i'm willing to sacrifice the splined bridges.

modules could be scenicked to different degrees

of course modules could be incorporated into something more permanent

greg - Philadelphia & Reading / Reading

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Posted by CNW Lover on Thursday, October 17, 2019 7:38 AM

Thanks for all your ideas and suggestions.  I was able to contact someone associated with the show and he sent me a few photos. Here's a link (I HOPE!) to view 3 of the pictures.  I added some red arrows to indicate where the openings are for the track connections between the boxes.   https://photo.walgreens.com/library/share?via=link&token=D7fBnNjggl7AJSBIcRwk7Q/AUS/1002199890070/WALGREENS

 

 

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Posted by Medina1128 on Thursday, October 17, 2019 7:51 AM

I used to store my photos on Photobucket, they got greedy and started charging to allow us to post them to 3rd party sites, like the forum. I now use imgbb.com. It's free!

IMGBB.com

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Posted by SPSOT fan on Thursday, October 17, 2019 11:18 AM

Are we talking about something like MRVP’s Olympia layout? I believe these are called shadow boxes.

I think they are a popular style of show layout in Britain and Europe.

I think they do a pretty good job of highlighting fine details. Instead of making a viewer look out at a broad scene, they pull a viewer into the shadow box to take a close look at the detail. I think they are an excellent way to showcase superdetailed scenes, aespecially in larger (HO and higher) scales!

Regards, Isaac

I model my railroad and you model yours! I model my way and you model yours!

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Posted by Tinplate Toddler on Thursday, October 17, 2019 11:21 AM

SPSOT fan
I think they are a popular style of show layout in Britain and Europe.

More in Britain and France, but not so much in Germany or the rest of Europe. Btw, Britain is a part of Europe, whether they like it or not. Europe is not a ncountry, but a continent.

Happy times!

Ulrich (aka The Tin Man)

"You´re never too old for a happy childhood!"

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