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Miter cuts for joist ends

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  • Member since
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  • From: Richmond, VA
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Miter cuts for joist ends
Posted by carl425 on Sunday, August 11, 2019 12:39 PM

Installing a curved fascia requires an occasional miter cut on the joist end. Anybody have a trick for making precise miter cuts on joist ends already installed?

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Posted by rrinker on Sunday, August 11, 2019 1:04 PM

 Most jigsaws have a tilting base so you can set the blade at any angle desired. Probably the simplest way. A circular saw can do it as well, but it bigger and heavier.

 This is another time when pretty close is close enough, nothing says you need to draw the screws in so tight that it forces the fascia totally flat against the end of the joist. In fact, good luck determining the precise angle to make it a perfect fit when the fascia is curving and not a series of angled steps. If there is a slight gap on one side of the joist when looking down from the top, it won't hurt anything. I'm not saying be sloppy and cut the joist at a 45 degree angle when a 20 degree angle will do, but if calculations show the exact angle should be 23.324 degrees, 25 degrees will be plenty good enough. 20 or 30 degrees would probably be fine, even. 

 If at a joist where the next one past will cause the fascia to start bending back in towards the layout, either leave it flat snf don;t draw the screws in tight, or just knock off both edges a little, a little sanding would be fine.

                                 --Randy

 


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Posted by carl425 on Sunday, August 11, 2019 1:28 PM

rrinker
Most jigsaws have a tilting base so you can set the blade at any angle desired. Probably the simplest way. A circular saw can do it as well, but it bigger and heavier.

Unfortunately, the one I need at the moment is 67.5°. None of my saws will tilt that far.  I've been thinking about attaching steel mending strips to the joist as  guides and use my sawsall.  After cutting I could leave the steel in place and clean it up with my belt sander.

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Posted by ROBERT PETRICK on Sunday, August 11, 2019 1:32 PM

carl425

Installing a curved fascia requires an occasional miter cut on the joist end. Anybody have a trick for making precise miter cuts on joist ends already installed?

Hey Carl-

Two suggestions . . .

First, there are small hand saws that can be used in tight spaces. Some are kinda like a back saw but without the stiffening rib so you can cut pretty flush. Some are razor sharp Japanese pull saws that can cut really flush. Some just look like miniature hand saws of the traditional shape. Plain old-fashioned coping saws can also do the job. Or even a hacksaw blade removed from the frame and wrapped with duct tape on one end to make a hand grip.

Second, cut the joists an inch or so short so that the square edge is clear of the intended curvature point. Then, cut a short length of joist with the proper miter cut and 'sister' it to the stub end joist. The scabbed-on 'joists' will now be 3/4" or so offset from the full joists, but they will have the proper angle to securely secure the fascia to them.

Hope this helps.

Robert

 

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Posted by carl425 on Sunday, August 11, 2019 2:11 PM

Thanks Robert

I've been looking for an excuse to get one of those cool Japanese saws.  Maybe this is it.  I can also use it to trim the dowel I need to put in the hole my 3-year old grandson drilled in the floor.

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Posted by UNCLEBUTCH on Sunday, August 11, 2019 2:29 PM

carl425
Unfortunately, the one I need at the moment is 67.5°.

 67.5 ???  Oh I forgot you follow NASA spec.

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Posted by carl425 on Sunday, August 11, 2019 3:08 PM

UNCLEBUTCH
67.5 ???

22.5° from the board's point of view.  Not that odd.  My chop saw has a click stop at 22.5°.

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Posted by Pruitt on Sunday, August 11, 2019 7:10 PM

carl425
My chop saw has a click stop at 22.5°.

There's your answer, Carl! Hold the chop saw against the joist and use it to get a precise cut. Clown

Or maybe pull the joist if possible, cut it on the chop saw, then reinstall it...

What is your fascia made of, and how thick is it? If it's relatively robust, angle the screw through the fascia at the point where it contacts the board, and cinch it up. That way it won't pull the fascia out of true, and the end of the board won't either. That might be easiest of all.

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Posted by doctorwayne on Sunday, August 11, 2019 7:28 PM

I have curved fascia all over the place, and no need for angled cuts anywhere...

...so there should be little need to complicate things.

Wayne

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Posted by hardcoalcase on Sunday, August 11, 2019 9:59 PM

I'm in the same place right now, here's my practice:

  • In benchwork construction, I cut the joists slightly to the "too long" side.  
  • Once the subroadbed & track is installed and I'm about to install the fascia, I'll use a T-square leveled to the track, to determine where I want the fascia to be, and the desired end cut angle of each joist.
  • If I can make a reasonably close angle cut on the joist, I'll do it with a skill saw and the aid of a clamped-on straight edge guide for a plum cut.
  • If not, I'll simply make the desired angle cut on a scrap piece on my mitre saw and screw it onto the end of the joist, shortening the joist if needed.
  • We're not talking about "fine furniture carpentry" here, just getting the fascia plum... shims are your friend!

Jim

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Posted by carl425 on Sunday, August 11, 2019 11:08 PM

Pruitt
There's your answer, Carl! Hold the chop saw against the joist and use it to get a precise cut.

I'm embarrassed to admit it, but I actually thought about that.  I have an adjustable height stool that I considered putting the chop saw on, then jacking it up to the joist.  Ideas like this are why they invented OHSA. Smile

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Posted by riogrande5761 on Monday, August 12, 2019 7:04 AM

You know, you could always put some kind of shim in, maybe with hot glue, to help the hard board flow around the ends of the joists.

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Posted by York1 on Monday, August 12, 2019 8:07 AM

carl425
I can also use it to trim the dowel I need to put in the hole my 3-year old grandson drilled in the floor.

Oh,oh!  That sounds like an interesting story.  Hope it wasn't an expensive hardwood floor in the middle of the living room.

 

Wayne, your fascia and layout look great!

John

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Posted by mrrdad on Tuesday, August 13, 2019 10:18 AM

I'm kind of with Wayne on this. Still don't understand the need for the angle cut. I'm guessing you are looking for more contact surface to nail the facia to.

Regardless, this isn't difficult. Scribe a line on the lumber at the angle you want to cut. Cut it with a jig saw or better yet a reciprocating saw (sawzall). If you don't have one, they can be bought cheap from Harbor Freight.

 

Ed

Modeling the B&O Chicago Terminal Railroad in the 1950's

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Posted by mrrdad on Tuesday, August 13, 2019 10:21 AM

carl425

 

 
Pruitt
There's your answer, Carl! Hold the chop saw against the joist and use it to get a precise cut.

 

I'm embarrassed to admit it, but I actually thought about that.  I have an adjustable height stool that I considered putting the chop saw on, then jacking it up to the joist.  Ideas like this are why they invented OHSA. Smile

 

Sounds like a great way to lose a hand or finger to me.

 

Ed

Modeling the B&O Chicago Terminal Railroad in the 1950's

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Posted by gregc on Tuesday, August 13, 2019 1:01 PM

what about a metal bracket, bent at desired angle, screwed into joist and bolted to fascia

greg - Philadelphia & Reading / Reading

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Posted by carl425 on Tuesday, August 13, 2019 10:01 PM

gregc
what about a metal bracket, bent at desired angle, screwed into joint and bolted to fascia

Not a bad idea, Greg.  I've always wondered why we don't use more nuts and bolts.  I've been considering using bolts instead of wood screws to attach the corner braces I use when joining one-by lumber at right angles.

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Posted by gregc on Wednesday, August 14, 2019 6:37 AM

i was thinking of a bent angle bracket.     once mounted on the joist, aligning a hole in the fascia with a hole in the braket might be difficult.  holding a nut behind the braket might be even more difficult.

but you could drill and tap a new hole in the braket so that once the holes are aligned you can simply screw a flathead machine screw into the bracket.

greg - Philadelphia & Reading / Reading

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