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Landscaping rural feedmill & lumberyard area

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  • Member since
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Landscaping rural feedmill & lumberyard area
Posted by RealGomer on Friday, April 26, 2019 8:30 PM

I'm the home stretch on my first layout in over 40 years and want to do something to simulate dirt and gravel in area about 65" around. I'm guessing because I used 21" radius curves which surround the area. The structures are a feed mill and lumber yard. I was thinking about using either 3M Picture spray glue and then sprinkle Woodland scenics dirt & gravel, or use diluted white glue and a spray bottle. I already used the 3M glue to hold down other details and it works pretty well. The surface is plywood.

Is one better than the other or is there another option?

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Posted by mbinsewi on Friday, April 26, 2019 9:03 PM

I would say use what you think works.  I don't think one is better than the other, they each have their own characteristics, and uses.

The diluted glue might be a little more forgiving, if you decide to change anything. And with a spray can of 3M,  your going to have to protect areas.

Use what has worked for you in the past, and what your comfortable with.

Mike.

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Posted by doctorwayne on Saturday, April 27, 2019 1:09 AM

I consider the diluted white glue much more versatile than spray glue, as you can apply all of the various ground cover material in almost as many layers and applications that you might require, before having to wet them and apply the glue.  You can also go back later - a couple of days or a couple of years - and add material to alter the original appearance.
 
When everything looks satisfactory, use a good quality sprayer to mist the entire area (at first, let the droplets fall onto the material rather than spraying it directly, and once it's wet enough to not be blown away, you can spray more directly).

Don't skimp on the "wet" water...it's the key to getting durable scenic effects that will look loose, but stand-up to long term use.

Use a suitable applicator to apply the diluted white glue, and when you're done, let it dry completely.  Deep applications can take more than a week to fully dry. 

Wayne

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Posted by SPSOT fan on Saturday, April 27, 2019 1:37 AM

Firstly I am not sure you want to apply your dirt directly to the plywood, just because plywood is flat, while the real earth is not, it has little hills and bumps. I would recommend using pieces of foam insulation board to make bigger mounds and then cover it all with sculptamold (or similar products) to get a less uniform surface and smooth any gaps between foam board and the plywood. Don’t forget to paint a base color before adding dirt so you don’t see foam or plywood or sculptamold if the dirt doesn’t cover the area completely.

As for glue ”wet water” (50/50 water and white glue plus a few drops of dish soap) seems to be most popular. Make sure to mist the dirt/gravel with water or isopropyl alcohol first to make the glue soak through the scenery. If 3M works for you I see not reason not to use it but do make sure to mask of track, structures, etc first. Masking isn’t a bad idea if you use diluted glue either.

You could also use real sifted dirt and crushed stones, after all nothing looks better than the real thing!

Regards, Isaac

I model my railroad and you model yours! I model my way and you model yours!

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Posted by mbinsewi on Saturday, April 27, 2019 7:20 AM

RealGomer
want to do something to simulate dirt and gravel in area about 65" around. I'm guessing because I used 21" radius curves which surround the area. The structures are a feed mill and lumber yard.

Just to be sure what your doing, this area is all flat and represents more of gravel and dirt parking and access to the mill and lumber yard? 

You might want to find an "earth" color that matches what you want for a finish, and paint the plywood first, with a flat paint.

You could also "spot" the area with different static grasses.

Mike.

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Posted by UNCLEBUTCH on Saturday, April 27, 2019 11:28 AM

 I would try to talk you out of useing spray glue for this project;

It will go everywhere,little if any contol. Only the material in driect contact will be glued,and I feel its too expensive.

I agree with most of the above statements. My dirt comes from the garden,gravel from the driveway,[free]. Paint the area brown, tan,any earth color. Spread the dert/gravel as you like,build mounds,slopes,ditches, perhaps a pile in the cornor. I sprinkle a little fine green ground foam hereand there, I like the effect. Wet it gentle at first then good and wet. Note that if the track or whatever gets wet,no harm done. Then apply glue mix,it will flow thru the entire layers. And can be controled to the exactdrop where you need it. You can add more layers as you see fit, Or just rewet scrape up and start over.

Just my thoughts; in the 30s 40s 50s there was less open space and gravel. I recall our local feed mill was just dirt. Dusty when dry, mud when wet. Trees and brush and weeds, junk and clutter. Now days big open,graveled lots,clean no weeds or stuff.Depens on your time frame.

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Posted by kasskaboose on Monday, April 29, 2019 8:18 AM

 Being one who has a foam sub-roadbed, I suggest that route.  Foam is very forgiving and easy to form.  Creating a mound of dirt is far easier with a foam base. 

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Posted by MisterBeasley on Monday, April 29, 2019 3:00 PM

I don't spray anything on my layout.  Instead, I drip on isopropyl alcohol straight from the bottle with a pipette, and then add dilute white glue from the Elmer's bottle I mix it in.

This is much neater and I get better control this way.  The alcohol speeds drying, too.

I use the same process for ballasting track. I don't

It takes an iron man to play with a toy iron horse. 

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Posted by Bronx big guy on Tuesday, August 06, 2019 9:08 PM

Sorry, I’m joining this late and new to this forum so forgive this possibly dumb question: are you talking about outdoors or indoors?

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Posted by UNCLEBUTCH on Wednesday, August 07, 2019 9:56 AM

Bronx big guy
Sorry, I’m joining this late and new to this forum so forgive this possibly dumb question: are you talking about outdoors or indoors?

 I'm not the OP, and I'm not sure of your question. But, I always assume that unless stated other wise, such as ''garden RR'' ,all converstations relate to indoor layouts.

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