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Newberry-Columbia, SC: Military presence

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  • Member since
    November, 2003
  • 488 posts
Newberry-Columbia, SC: Military presence
Posted by robert sylvester on Sunday, January 06, 2019 5:22 AM

Travel

As a retired Colonel and a model railroader I do like a touch of the military on my layouts. Some may not but it is a way for me to recognize those who served and reminds me of my time in uniform.

 101-2429.jpg

It's a small post but over the years I have acquired some nice equipment.

101-2428.jpg

I try to make the  post or camp look busy. Ground equipment is by Rocco, the hut is by Rix.

101-2401.jpg

Even a small airfield is a reminder of my tour at Thule, Greenland; that's where I learned to fly the old DC-3, the Gooney Bird.

101-2394.jpg

I miss those days, my uniforms are still in the closet, Battle Dress Uniforms, dress blues, even my Class A's, which they don't wear anymore.

Anyone who served, I salute you and thank you for your service.

Robert Sylvester

Newberry-Columbia, SC

  • Member since
    August, 2003
  • From: Collinwood, Ohio, USA
  • 7,067 posts
Posted by gmpullman on Sunday, January 06, 2019 5:51 AM

My son graduated from Ft. Jackson. The family and I rode Amtrak there to attend the ceremony. I applaud anyone who models a scene that brings them good memories. I have a few armoured vehicles as flat car loads and I like to run troop trains on occasion.

 IMG_4038_fix by Edmund, on Flickr

Thank You, Ed

  • Member since
    November, 2003
  • 488 posts
Posted by robert sylvester on Sunday, January 06, 2019 11:10 AM

Travel Nice looking cars, are they brass? Where did you get those, they look like troop carriers. Give a salute to your son from an old Colonel and thank him for his service, congratulations. My son graduated from Parris Island two years ago, now in the Corp serving in the Pacific Islands.

Robert Sylvester

Newberry-Columbia Line, SC

  • Member since
    September, 2003
  • 9,771 posts
Posted by mlehman on Monday, January 07, 2019 9:10 AM

Robert, those look a bit different, but Walthers did produce both troop sleepers and troop kitchen cars. Check the usual sources for old stock and used equipment.

Mike Lehman

Urbana, IL

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    November, 2003
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Posted by robert sylvester on Monday, January 07, 2019 12:13 PM

Yes Mike, I actually have two of their kitchen cars, but the ones in the picture I realy like for troop cars.

Robert Sylvester.Newberry-Columbia, SC

  • Member since
    July, 2006
  • From: Bradford, Ontario
  • 9,168 posts
Posted by hon30critter on Tuesday, January 08, 2019 1:07 AM

Robert,

I like the military scenes!

Thank you and your son (Ed's too) for serving your country. Doing so is truly an honourable undertaking.

My dad served in WWII as a navigator/bomber and after the war he joined the Ontario Regiment armoured militia unit. He went on the become the Commanding Officer of the Ontario's. Every time I think of his military service my pride gushes over.

Dave

  • Member since
    August, 2003
  • From: Collinwood, Ohio, USA
  • 7,067 posts
Posted by gmpullman on Tuesday, January 08, 2019 3:20 AM

Thanks for the comments and compliments, Fellas!

I was lucky to have found both styles of those troop sleepers on Ebay. I seem to recall that they were very reasonable, too. Both imported by Railworks. PRR was an early provider of converted troop cars. These were made from box cars.

 IMG_1552 by Edmund, on Flickr

In one of the PRR books I have they show one of these cars years later lettered Penn-Central and you could see inside the car where the round windows had been plated over.

Here is a nice page with photos of some of the PRR's efforts toward Victory.

https://tehistory.org/hqda/html/v42/v42n2p035.html

My dad was in the reserves for two years guarding the coast of Maine then got called up in the regular Army, 181st. Inf. for another four.

 JJT_181st-inf by Edmund, on Flickr

I was 1-A in 1973 and ready to go but things were winding down then and I never got called (lottery) I requested Ft. Eustis for the railroad ops.

My hat is off to anyone who served.

 PRR_GI-coach by Edmund, on Flickr

Cheers, Ed

  • Member since
    November, 2003
  • 488 posts
Posted by robert sylvester on Thursday, January 10, 2019 8:00 AM

Captain What a great web sight with the description and history of the PRR during WW II. Just think of the logistics to carry that off, the shipment of men and heavy equipment and supplies for the men and women that served. It really does say something about our country and how we all came together. I wasn't there but my father was even to the point of the Batan Death march, at least that what my mother and I found out later, he never discussed it.

You troop cars as I said are wonderful, they realy take you back in time and for me that is what this hobby is all about. Creating a time capsule through visual three dimentional pictures. The forties are my favorite time, not the war, but what this country did. A sleeping giant really woke up and let the world know who we were.

Thanks, wonderful response. I will take some pics of my troop cars this weekend and share.

Robert Sylvester

Newberry-Columbia Line, SC

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