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Logging Locos & Minimum Radius Curves

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Logging Locos & Minimum Radius Curves
Posted by railandsail on Sunday, September 23, 2018 6:47 AM

In general the many real life logging locos could negotiate some pretty rough track, and I imagine some pretty tight turns.

What will our models do? What sort of minimum radius turns will our HO logging locos negotiate?

I'm thinking of building a small logging scene on a hanging peninsula section, and I am wondering if I can put a return loop at one end,...perhaps as little as 14-16 inches radius.

I've got a variety of nice loggers I'd like to run (continuously) on a compact logging track 'loop'

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Posted by wvg_ca on Sunday, September 23, 2018 7:02 AM

-should- be okay ...

i've got geared steam looging running on 18-22 " radius , no issues

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Posted by snjroy on Sunday, September 23, 2018 7:50 AM

For shays, climaxes and other geared engines, you should be ok with 15" radius. I would avoid rolling stock longer than 50' for operations.

Simon

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Posted by railandsail on Sunday, September 23, 2018 8:35 AM

snjroy

For shays, climaxes and other geared engines, you should be ok with 15" radius. I would avoid rolling stock longer than 50' for operations.

Simon

 

I got to wondering if the shasfts on those MODEL shays were long enough?

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Posted by SeeYou190 on Sunday, September 23, 2018 9:47 AM

If you are willing to modify equipment, anything is possible.

.

These are six inch radius curves in HO scale.

.

.

-Kevin

.

Happily modeling the STRATTON & GILLETTE RAILROAD located in a world of plausible nonsense set in August, 1954.

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Posted by rrebell on Sunday, September 23, 2018 10:25 AM

SeeYou190

If you are willing to modify equipment, anything is possible.

.

These are six inch radius curves in HO scale.

.

.

-Kevin

.

 

Didn't know you could go that low, 12" is easy but 6", wow.

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Posted by railandsail on Sunday, September 23, 2018 10:53 AM

6" radius !!....double WOW.

I didn't think the concentric drive shafts of the shays would permit this?

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Posted by railandsail on Sunday, September 23, 2018 11:21 AM

From the MRH forum got this excellent reply, along with a reference to a whole list of locos and their recommended minimums, and their possible lower minimums.

Dear Brian,

Which specific locos (make, model, and era/production-run) did you have in mind/on the roster?

FWIW:
- The B'mann Class B Climax is factory-rated for 18" radii,
can do 15" stock,
and has been reported as capable of 12" with modifications

- The B'mann Class C Shay is factory-rated for 18" radii,
and has been reported as capable of 12" if converted to a Class B 2-trucker.
(BVM did an On30 2-trucker conversion kit some years ago, providing the proving ground for this one).

- The B'mann 45-tonner (honorary geared logging loco, those siderods...) is factory-rated for 18" radii,
and has been reported as capable of 10".

If you're got 15" radii capability, then you should have enough elbow room for most common HO RTR offerings, providing your track-laying, loco and rollingstock configs, and coupler operation is tuned to perfection...

For reference, read and heed, particularly the intro on Page 1

Happy Modelling,


Aim to Improve,
Prof Klyzlr

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Posted by SeeYou190 on Sunday, September 23, 2018 3:28 PM

rrebell
Didn't know you could go that low, 12" is easy but 6", wow.

.

I did not build that scene, but I did talk to the builder. It is on a modular train layout in Georgia. The small radius lets the whole layout fit on a single module.

.

There were two trains. One was pulled by an 0-6-0 with one blind driver. They other was pulled by a heavily modified 44 ton GE locomotive. All the equipment had to be modified to make it work. It was quite a feat.

.

I doubt a shay would be possible on this radius.

.

-Kevin

.

Happily modeling the STRATTON & GILLETTE RAILROAD located in a world of plausible nonsense set in August, 1954.

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Posted by snjroy on Monday, September 24, 2018 9:50 AM

Hi there. This review suggests that the 3 truck climax made by Bachmann can handle 15" radius. 

http://mrr.trains.com/news-reviews/staff-reviews/2011/03/bachmann-trains-ho-scale-climax-locomotive

Simon

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Posted by railandsail on Tuesday, September 25, 2018 6:54 AM

snjroy

Hi there. This review suggests that the 3 truck climax made by Bachmann can handle 15" radius. 

http://mrr.trains.com/news-reviews/staff-reviews/2011/03/bachmann-trains-ho-scale-climax-locomotive

Simon

 



I believe that is the 'stock reply' ?

According to that reference I posted above,..

FWIW:
- The B'mann Class B Climax is factory-rated for 18" radii,
can do 15" stock,
and has been reported as capable of 12" with modifications
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Posted by snjroy on Wednesday, September 26, 2018 6:26 AM

Yes, I have the Bachmann B class climax, which is a 2 truck loco. I have no doubt that it could handle  a 15" curve (the gears broke a long time ago...).

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Posted by NVSRR on Wednesday, September 26, 2018 6:48 AM

rrebell

 

 
SeeYou190

If you are willing to modify equipment, anything is possible.

.

These are six inch radius curves in HO scale.

.

.

-Kevin

.

 

 

 

Didn't know you could go that low, 12" is easy but 6", wow.

 

 

 

To the traction fans, that is a standard city scene radious

A pessimist sees a dark tunnel

An optimist sees the light at the end of the tunnel

A realist sees a frieght train

An engineer sees three idiots standing on the tracks stairing blankly in space

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Posted by B. Bryce on Thursday, September 27, 2018 10:24 PM

I have a 2-4-0 tanker and a 2-6-0 tanker and they will both do a 9" radius.  The problem I had was the freight cars with logs could not make the turns, even though the trucks could make the turns, the logging cars hit each other end to end.  I installed Kadee long shank couplers and they work fine.

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Posted by railandsail on Tuesday, October 09, 2018 4:23 PM

Mantua 2-6-6-2


...from another forum

I've read and I am pretty certain the Mantua 2-6-6-2 and 2-6-6-0 can go around 15" just like the prototype.

 

I have a couple of those Mantua loggers. I'll have to get them a try one of these days.

I also have a really nice Toby brass one that I would hope might make this radius.

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Posted by railandsail on Tuesday, October 09, 2018 4:27 PM

Brass ain't Plastic

Dear Brian,

As a general rule, plastic always turns tighter than brass. (Holds true for shays, climaxes, mallets, and diesels).

I would be cautious in assuming a brass mallet could bend as tight as a Mantra mallet. (carefully test, but don't be surprised if it doesn't work)

 

 

 

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Posted by railandsail on Tuesday, October 09, 2018 4:30 PM

Toby version, brass

I have a Toby version and I am interested in its minimum radius capability due to the limited width of my central peninsula. Otherwise it will become a display loco as soon as I drag it out of storage.

Meanwhile I was cruising thru some old CD disc of mine and found this photo of that loco Joe pictured above,..

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Posted by railandsail on Tuesday, October 09, 2018 4:32 PM

GREAT Sigh of relief today

Yesterday (Sunday) I spent the day looking for my brass logging locos. I had  saved most of my 'upscale' locos in a HD footlocker and a HD special locking box used to ship valuable big film cameras. I had raided these boxes once before and pulled some of these items out to several indoor storage locations.

I could not find that one particular Toby 2-6-6-2 brass one, and I was sure I had NOT sold it off along with a number of brass locos I DID sell off when I was considering relocating to Thailand full time. I looked and relooked and could not find it. I was just about resigned to the fact that I may have lost it, or sold it.

So this morning I decided to have one more look around the cargo trailer. WOW! I found it,...along with another brass Climax one.     great sigh of relief.

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Posted by railandsail on Tuesday, October 09, 2018 4:35 PM

Book & Kits

 

1) I found a GREAT book I had saved, "The Locomotive Portraits, vol3" by Kinsey,...including 41 superb photos of the logging industry's steam locomotives, historical essays by John Labbs on each loco, and the logging operation(s) it served,...with excerpts from conversations with some of the old time engineers, firemen, and brakemen.

 

2) Surprise,...just when I began to think it would be nice to have some timber structures/industry,....I found two of Walther's unbuilt kits of their 'Trees & Trains' series,...the Saw Mill. etc ( I knew I had saved lots of their kits, but never realized I had that one).

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