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Backdrop painting of the Rockies

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  • Member since
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  • From: Sweden
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Backdrop painting of the Rockies
Posted by Graffen on Monday, June 25, 2018 2:32 AM

I've started the work on the landscape painting on the backdrop.
To make a representation of the Colorado rockies isn't as easy as it sounds....
You want them to be tall and imposing, and have the color variations of the real thing.
On top of that I have to find a level of detail that I'm satisfied with.
I use regular artist acrylics for the painting.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Swedish Custom painter and model maker. My Website:

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Posted by riogrande5761 on Monday, June 25, 2018 5:51 AM

Looks good.  I'm looking a little further west on the Grande to the Grande Junction and Utahline part of the D&RGW east-west mainline.

Rio Grande.  The Action Road

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Posted by Doughless on Monday, June 25, 2018 9:09 AM

I think you've captured the sense of distance very well.  More detailed trees in the foreground, a hazy gray mountain with not much detail way back, and kind of a furry looking peak in between.

Color on photographs can be deceiving.  I think mountains tend to get grayer as they fade into the distance.  You might want to make the trees on the furry peak not look as brown as those in the foreground.  Maybe a touch grayer since the peak is in the distance?

- Douglas

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Posted by rrebell on Tuesday, June 26, 2018 2:01 PM

Needs to be hazed out some, especially the rear mountain, you got the general feel but colors are a bit bright for the distances being painted. Just remember, you asked and I have seen your work so I know you can do it and yes I do have a background in art for those who think I am just nit picking.

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Posted by garya on Tuesday, June 26, 2018 3:00 PM

rrebell

Needs to be hazed out some, especially the rear mountain, you got the general feel but colors are a bit bright for the distances being painted. Just remember, you asked and I have seen your work so I know you can do it and yes I do have a background in art for those who think I am just nit picking.

 

You could haze it out with a thinned light coat of white or very light gray through an airbrush.

Gary
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Posted by 7j43k on Tuesday, June 26, 2018 7:57 PM

garya
 

You could haze it out with a thinned light coat of white or very light gray through an airbrush.

 

 

And some blue, I think.

 

Ed

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Posted by riogrande5761 on Wednesday, June 27, 2018 10:24 AM

I agree about the hazing.  Many do it effectively to create a sense of distance on parts meant to be further away.

 

Rio Grande.  The Action Road

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Posted by hon30critter on Wednesday, June 27, 2018 10:54 PM

Hi Graffen:

If I may, I would suggest doing the distant mountains in soft purples and grays. The colours should get softer the further away the mountain is supposed to be. Green implies full tree coverage which isn't usually the case on tall mountains, at least not in the Rockies. The tree line on distant mountains is usually below the line of sight.

My 2 Cents

Dave

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Posted by rrebell on Thursday, June 28, 2018 10:59 AM

I do hope everyone knows he is a profesional painter. The only reason I piped in was sometimes when you do a large project, you get cought up in things and don't notice something simple as you deal with the large scope of the project.

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Posted by riogrande5761 on Thursday, June 28, 2018 11:24 AM

rrebell

I do hope everyone knows he is a profesional painter.  

Regardless, I still agree with the haze comments.  

Rio Grande.  The Action Road

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Posted by rrebell on Thursday, June 28, 2018 1:22 PM

riogrande5761

 

 
rrebell

I do hope everyone knows he is a profesional painter.  

 

 

Regardless, I still agree with the haze comments.  

 

No question about that.

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Posted by BigDaddy on Thursday, June 28, 2018 5:53 PM

I've been to the grand tetons 4 different times. Once I got a crystal clear shot of the mountains with flowers in the foreground.  Everyother time it was hazy every single day.

I could live with clear and sharp as Graffen has painted. 

Henry

COB Potomac & Northern

By the Chesapeake Bay

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Posted by mlehman on Thursday, June 28, 2018 8:55 PM

Doing the hazing is a good point, but I suspect that's later in the process. I'm no expert here, but from what I've seen is the artitst puts down some base coats, then details in various passes using fairly strong colors for many detais, while adding whte to the mixing of other colors as the process proceeds. Eventually most things are covered with the "haze" , then the whole vista is overcoated, sometimes multiple times. This depends a lot on the distance being portrayed, so more distance, more haze.

Graff will get around to it, I'm sure. It's a great scene developing!

Mike Lehman

Urbana, IL

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Posted by rrebell on Friday, June 29, 2018 8:43 AM

mlehman

Doing the hazing is a good point, but I suspect that's later in the process. I'm no expert here, but from what I've seen is the artitst puts down some base coats, then details in various passes using fairly strong colors for many detais, while adding whte to the mixing of other colors as the process proceeds. Eventually most things are covered with the "haze" , then the whole vista is overcoated, sometimes multiple times. This depends a lot on the distance being portrayed, so more distance, more haze.

Graff will get around to it, I'm sure. It's a great scene developing!

 

Not so much in the canvas world and not neccisarly white.

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Posted by riogrande5761 on Friday, June 29, 2018 9:34 AM

I can't tell for sure but it looks like Graf started with totally covering the backdrop with clouds and then started painting the scenery over it.  Interesing but one way to do it.

I've followed Rob Spanglers backdrops.  I am not aware that he is a "professional" painter but he really "kills it" with his backdrops.  But I'm also biased because I really love the Utah desert land scapes too.

Rio Grande.  The Action Road

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Posted by Doughless on Saturday, June 30, 2018 9:47 AM

mlehman

Doing the hazing is a good point, but I suspect that's later in the process. I'm no expert here, but from what I've seen is the artitst puts down some base coats, then details in various passes using fairly strong colors for many detais, while adding whte to the mixing of other colors as the process proceeds. Eventually most things are covered with the "haze" , then the whole vista is overcoated, sometimes multiple times. This depends a lot on the distance being portrayed, so more distance, more haze.

Graff will get around to it, I'm sure. It's a great scene developing!

 

I'm not a professional painter, but instead of covering one color with another color later, which might result in a layering effect the eye detects, I would get a head start on the haze effect by mixing some gray paint into the colors as I painted.  Mix more gray into the colors as I worked farther into the distance.

- Douglas

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Posted by garya on Saturday, June 30, 2018 11:56 AM

riogrande5761

I've followed Rob Spanglers backdrops.  I am not aware that he is a "professional" painter but he really "kills it" with his backdrops.  But I'm also biased because I really love the Utah desert land scapes too.

 

He has mentioned in the past that he has had some art training.

Gary
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Posted by garya on Saturday, June 30, 2018 12:00 PM

Doughless

I'm not a professional painter, but instead of covering one color with another color later, which might result in a layering effect the eye detects, I would get a head start on the haze effect by mixing some gray paint into the colors as I painted.  Mix more gray into the colors as I worked farther into the distance.

 

Usually one mixes gray or sky blue color with the background colors, as Dave Frary describes, and then follow up with a haze coat.

Gary
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Posted by mlehman on Sunday, July 01, 2018 2:40 AM

rrebell
Not so much in the canvas world and not neccisarly white.

Was talking ganeralities here, because A. I don't know what exact process Graff follows and in what order and B. there are many ways to do this depending on the medium being used (oil, acrylic, watercolor, etc), on what (because modelers tend to paint on all sorts of stuff that many artists wouldn't),  what style they prefer, and their training (if any).

And there are lots of varieties of "white."  It's also not really "haze" either, but I'm willing to play along. We're talking about the same process, so to me best to find points of agreement instead of splitting hairs.

Mike Lehman

Urbana, IL

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