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Laying Campbell Shingles

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Laying Campbell Shingles
Posted by BigDaddy on Wednesday, May 02, 2018 8:59 PM

I am building a Details Associate Roundhouse and it came with Campbell's shingles.  The picture of the roof, is deceiving, and taking my own pictures did not help.  It looks like a simple trapezoid. 

It is not, nor is it a gentle curve.  Each roof above each stall is a trapezoid in a separate plane from the next roof segment.

A strip of shingles cannot simply curve around, they have to change angles at every section (3) of roof.

My instinct is to start on the middle section, hard to explain why, but I think it might be easier to get the angle where they meet to look right.  Is that right or should I start on the end and work my way right to left?

 

 
 
 
 

Henry

COB Potomac & Northern

By the Chesapeake Bay

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Posted by mbinsewi on Wednesday, May 02, 2018 9:16 PM

I've never done a round house roof, but pictures I've seen on a search, show each section, handled as a seperate roof, with a typical roof "valley" between each section.  The back side would be a typical roof "ridge".

I wouldn't think it would matter where you started.

Mike.

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Posted by RR_Mel on Wednesday, May 02, 2018 10:17 PM

I’ve been using Campbell shingles for over 40 years and they are curveable.  I don’t use straight water to wet the shingle strips, I use Arleen’s Wood Glue as the adhesive.  Be extra carful and don’t get any glue on the surface of the shingles if you are planning to stain them, the glue won’t take the stain.  Don’t saturate the shingles or the card stock because it can take 24 hours to dry and it will warp.
 
There isn’t a better scale shingle roof than a Campbell shake roof.   
 
Mel
 
Modeling the early to mid 1950s SP in HO scale since 1951
  
 
My Model Railroad   
 
Bakersfield, California
 
I'm beginning to realize that aging is not for wimps.
 
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Posted by doctorwayne on Wednesday, May 02, 2018 10:41 PM

The best place to start is at the bottom. Smile, Wink & Grin

Mike's suggestion to use valleys between segments is prototypical, and solves the problem of the angles created by the shape of the roof segments.
I'd do the middle section first, since it's the only one where each course will need to be pre-cut to length.  The outer sections can be cut a little longer than needed, then trimmed after all shingles are in place.

I used Campbell shingles on several structures, but since all of them were styrene, didn't use the pre-gummed feature.  Instead, I cut all of the slightly oversize strips needed for the entire roof, then brushed-on gelled contact cement, being very careful to keep the strips from coming in contact with one another.
The roof was then given a quick brushed-on coating of lacquer thinner to "prep" the styrene (this keeps the styrene from drawing too much solvent out of the contact cement, and allows the brushed-on cement to go on much more smoothly).  After the contact cement had dried for the specified time, it was quick and easy work to add the shingles. After all were in place, I used a sharp blade to trim-off the excess at the gable ends...

Wayne

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Posted by BigDaddy on Thursday, May 03, 2018 12:00 PM

Thanks guys, great pics as always Wayne.

Mel are you working with styrene as the reason to use glue?

 

Henry

COB Potomac & Northern

By the Chesapeake Bay

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Posted by SpaceMouse on Thursday, May 03, 2018 12:53 PM

BigDaddy
A strip of shingles cannot simply curve around, they have to change angles at every section (3) of roof.

Nevermind--brainfart.

Chip

Building the Rock Ridge Railroad with the slowest construction crew west of the Pecos.

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Posted by RR_Mel on Thursday, May 03, 2018 1:33 PM

Henry
 
It’s been so long since I stopped using the stickum on the back of the shingle strip that I can’t remember why I do it that way.  I do know it works great for me.  I have used the Campbell shingles on styrene and that works good too.
 
I bought a couple of Walthers Plastic Passenger platforms and used the Campbell shingles to match my 20 year old station.
 
 
 
 
 
Mel
 
Modeling the early to mid 1950s SP in HO scale since 1951
  
 
My Model Railroad   
 
Bakersfield, California
 
I'm beginning to realize that aging is not for wimps.
 
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Posted by j. c. on Thursday, May 03, 2018 2:01 PM

i no longer use the campbell shingles but when i did i used krylon spray adhesive ,a word of caution  upon moving over to styreen from wood  i found it would some times warp the roof. i now use B.E.S.T. shingles.  

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Posted by rrebell on Saturday, May 05, 2018 3:49 AM

Campbell shingles are great. I use plain white glue and never had a problem with alcohol stains for finishing. You can curve the Campbell shingles. For the top ridge I use strip wood, just looks better to me than laying on single shingles as they end up being too thick.

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Posted by SpaceMouse on Sunday, May 06, 2018 8:33 AM

BigDaddy
My instinct is to start on the middle section, hard to explain why, but I think it might be easier to get the angle where they meet to look right.  Is that right or should I start on the end and work my way right to left?

Actually I would do neither. 

In the real world, using roll shingles as you are doing, you would weave them, overlapping first one side then the other. 

Here, I would lay the first row along the bottom of the center running a little long on both sides. Then do the outsides running long over the valley.  Now complete both side sections before coming back to the center. Then I would lay the center section. Now when you cut the angles, there will be no gap, and no tell-tale modelers cut line.

Chip

Building the Rock Ridge Railroad with the slowest construction crew west of the Pecos.

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