Subscriber & Member Login

Login, or register today to interact in our online community, comment on articles, receive our newsletter, manage your account online and more!

Benchwork fascia

1062 views
28 replies
1 rating 2 rating 3 rating 4 rating 5 rating
  • Member since
    July, 2006
  • From: Phoenix, AZ
  • 1,085 posts
Benchwork fascia
Posted by bearman on Friday, February 09, 2018 12:06 PM

Has anyone installed a UTP in only 3/16" hardboard or in 1/4" plywood?  If so, was there an issue with the regular plugging and unplugging of  the throttle cable?

Bear "It's all about having fun."

  • Member since
    October, 2007
  • From: Fullerton, California
  • 852 posts
Posted by hornblower on Friday, February 09, 2018 2:43 PM

Bearman

You could always reinforce your fascia where you need to attach things by laminating another layer or two of material to the back side of the fascia.

Hornblower

  • Member since
    January, 2014
  • 533 posts
Posted by ROBERT PETRICK on Friday, February 09, 2018 3:16 PM

hornblower

Bearman

You could always reinforce your fascia where you need to attach things by laminating another layer or two of material to the back side of the fascia.

Yes. Cut a piece of plywood about 6"X4" and cut out a square hole about 2"X1". Then use the thing like a wooden fastener on the back side of the thin fascia. Use wood screws to go through the fascia and seat in the backer board, pinching everything together. 

Robert

LINK to SNSR Blog

  • Member since
    December, 2015
  • 2,466 posts
Posted by BigDaddy on Friday, February 09, 2018 5:04 PM

There must be something I am missing.  It's an RJ12 plug, not a trailer hitch. 

If the 1/4" ply or the 3/16" hardboard is well attached there is no need for any backing.

I was not ready to attach fascia, so I slapped a piece of 3/16" hardboard to the leg and leg support.  Therefore it is not parallel to the edge of the the table top layout.  Looks like I didn't install the UTP panel level either.  The RJ plug is going to break, long before the hardboard gives way.

 

Henry

COB Potomac & Northern

By the Chesapeake Bay

  • Member since
    July, 2006
  • From: Phoenix, AZ
  • 1,085 posts
Posted by bearman on Friday, February 09, 2018 5:21 PM

Actually, Big Daddy, it is an RJ11 4 conducter plug, but that is neither here nor there.  And, attachment of the hardboard is not going to be an issue...it will be attached and secure.

Bear "It's all about having fun."

  • Member since
    July, 2006
  • From: Phoenix, AZ
  • 1,085 posts
Posted by bearman on Friday, February 09, 2018 5:25 PM

Robert, I think I will try that.  The foam and plywood are 1 1/2 inches thick.  The fascia hardboard will be 6 inches wide/deep leaving 4 1/2 inches of hardboard underneath the base foam/plywood.  When I built the bench work I never expected to install UTP's in these two locations, which is why I asked the original question.

Bear "It's all about having fun."

  • Member since
    December, 2015
  • 2,466 posts
Posted by BigDaddy on Friday, February 09, 2018 5:42 PM

bearman
Actually, Big Daddy, it is an RJ11 4 conducter plug

There are some things than can't be learned,....at least by me.  Wink

 

Henry

COB Potomac & Northern

By the Chesapeake Bay

  • Member since
    July, 2006
  • From: Phoenix, AZ
  • 1,085 posts
Posted by bearman on Friday, February 09, 2018 5:44 PM

You are not the only one Big Daddy.

Bear "It's all about having fun."

  • Member since
    December, 2009
  • 13 posts
Posted by Carolina Northern on Friday, February 09, 2018 5:59 PM

Sorry, but that is an RJ-12, 6 conductor, at lease that's on all of my NCE parts.

  • Member since
    July, 2006
  • From: Phoenix, AZ
  • 1,085 posts
Posted by bearman on Friday, February 09, 2018 6:03 PM

As I understand it, with an SB5 booster the Power Cab throttle is now an Rj11 4 conductor, with the coiled cable  connector, and the CAB 06 throttles are both 4 conductor connectors.

Bear "It's all about having fun."

  • Member since
    December, 2009
  • 13 posts
Posted by Carolina Northern on Friday, February 09, 2018 7:32 PM

The jacks on the SB5 are 12's for the cab bus. They may only use the center four.

The curly cable that came with my 6 has the RJ-12 form Factor with only four conductors. The curly cable with my Power Cab has an RJ-11 on each end. From this, I'd say use an RJ-12 and wire the center four to be sure whatever cord you have fits.

I used leftover RJ-45 jacks on mine and an RJ-45 splitter as a passive hub for the three additional jacks I added to my layout, which is now gone. The nice thing about this series of parts is the smaller plugs still work in the larger jacks, just contact fewer pins.

  • Member since
    July, 2006
  • From: Phoenix, AZ
  • 1,085 posts
Posted by bearman on Friday, February 09, 2018 7:52 PM

Guys, guys, guys...at this point I do not care about whether it is an RJ12, or an RJ11 or an RJ1000, the question is will a 3/16" fascia with a UTP hold up in the long run?

Bear "It's all about having fun."

  • Member since
    March, 2015
  • 1,068 posts
Posted by SouthPenn on Friday, February 09, 2018 8:45 PM

Nobody ever heard of 'Radio Control'? No RJs needed.

South Penn
  • Member since
    July, 2006
  • From: Phoenix, AZ
  • 1,085 posts
Posted by bearman on Saturday, February 10, 2018 4:14 AM

I have heard of radio control and I am not interested.  Just something more complicated that can go wrong.  Besides I have too much invested in wires and cable and all that stuff.  

Bear "It's all about having fun."

  • Member since
    August, 2010
  • From: Columbia, IL
  • 258 posts
Posted by wdcrvr on Sunday, February 11, 2018 9:36 AM
Big Daddy you mention that the RJ plug will break before the panel does. That is my big concern. Is it difficult to replace the plug or do you need to buy a new cable? Can you make your own cable and thereby get a longer reach? Thanks wdcrvr
  • Member since
    July, 2006
  • From: Phoenix, AZ
  • 1,085 posts
Posted by bearman on Sunday, February 11, 2018 9:40 AM

You can make your own cables, but I just pay someone locally to do it.

Bear "It's all about having fun."

  • Member since
    January, 2014
  • 533 posts
Posted by ROBERT PETRICK on Sunday, February 11, 2018 9:53 AM

wdcrvr

Big Daddy you mention that the RJ plug will break before the panel does. That is my big concern. Is it difficult to replace the plug or do you need to buy a new cable? Can you make your own cable and thereby get a longer reach? Thanks wdcrvr

 

I don't think Big Daddy Henry said that the connector would break, I think he was saying that the panel was unlikely to break before the connector would. I think he was saying the connector wouldn't break in a million years, but the panel was even sturdier and it would take a million and one years to break.

Regarding making your own cable, there is a special tool to do that. It cuts the cable, strips the wires, and crimps the little plastic connector. You can buy one, but the easiest thing to do is borrow one from your company's IT Department or from one of your computer buddies. Unless you make a lot of cables, you don't really need to buy a special tool.

Robert 

LINK to SNSR Blog

  • Member since
    December, 2015
  • 2,466 posts
Posted by BigDaddy on Sunday, February 11, 2018 10:50 AM

bearman
Guys, guys, guys...at this point I do not care about whether it is an RJ12, or an RJ11 or an RJ1000, the question is will a 3/16" fascia with a UTP hold up in the long run?

I think I understand now.  Your fascia is 6" top to bottom, but the top 1.5" is aganst the plywood and foam base of the layout.  Your question is will the remaining 4.5" of hardboard be strong enough to withstand repeated plugging and unplugging?

I would say yes.  My pic is the power panel for the Power Cab, but the UTP panel doesn't look that much different in the height and width you need to cut out of the fascia.  From memory.....1.25" high and 2.5" wide.  You will have plenty of meat on the hardboard around the panel so it won't crack unless you have anger management issues or a King Kong thing going on.

The plugs, whatever the correct designation is, have a little plastic arm to help them clip on.  It's plastic and plastic gets brittle over time and you are flexing it each time you plug and unplug it.  It's going to break eventually.  The are easily replaced with the tool you can find at Home Depot.  I would not lose any sleep over that little clip.

If you want to lose sleep over something, buy a microwave made in South Korea.  When the handle breaks off while it is under warranty, they won't cover it.

 

 

Henry

COB Potomac & Northern

By the Chesapeake Bay

  • Member since
    July, 2006
  • From: Phoenix, AZ
  • 1,085 posts
Posted by bearman on Sunday, February 11, 2018 10:55 AM

Yes, Henry, you are correct.

Bear "It's all about having fun."

  • Member since
    July, 2006
  • From: North Dakota
  • 7,659 posts
Posted by BroadwayLion on Sunday, February 11, 2018 11:19 AM

ROBERT PETRICK
Regarding making your own cable, there is a special tool to do that. It cuts the cable, strips the wires, and crimps the little plastic connector. You can buy one, but the easiest thing to do is borrow one from your company's IT Department or from one of your computer buddies. Unless you make a lot of cables, you don't really need to buy a special tool.

 

LION has one of those tools. Actually the LION has TWO of those tools. Him could not find where him left the first one, and so him bought an udder. Tool Costs $30-$70

 

OK, so LION runs a computer network, and so him has to make lotsa cables. Guess what? BIG FURRY PAWS WITH ARTHRITIS AND DIFFICULT VISION can no longer put those things together without a lot of ROARING and cussing. and so  the Abbot and I agreed that it would be best to buy pre-made cables in the long run.

Now I got drawers full of NIC cables of different lengths. Long distance runs are CAT-6 cable and are difficult to terminate in a male plug because the cable is of greater diameter than the plug thingies. LION uses CAT-5e Strtanded for patch cords, but like him said, him buys those now rather than making them.

The Cat-6 cable terminate in the female plug and these him can punch down with no problem at all. So I get maintenanace to run the CAT-6s for me and then I punch in the terminal plugs at each end.

Oh Well. I do not now about this DCC stuff at all. but it seems to me that you can terminate cables in a punchdown plug, and then use patch cords to connect them to your appliances.

 

 

ROAR

The Route of the Broadway Lion The Largest Subway Layout in North Dakota.

Here there be cats.                                LIONS with CAMERAS

  • Member since
    July, 2006
  • From: Phoenix, AZ
  • 1,085 posts
Posted by bearman on Sunday, February 11, 2018 12:14 PM

the ever resourceful Broadway Lion.

Bear "It's all about having fun."

  • Member since
    August, 2010
  • From: Columbia, IL
  • 258 posts
Posted by wdcrvr on Sunday, February 11, 2018 2:43 PM
Big Daddy What would be the correct name for this tool for attaching the plugs to the cables? I don't want to go to home depot and ask for a "cable fixing tool thingy" if I can avoid it. Oh and by the way what would be the best place to buy the cables and the plugs? Thanks wdcrvr
  • Member since
    July, 2006
  • From: Phoenix, AZ
  • 1,085 posts
Posted by bearman on Sunday, February 11, 2018 2:50 PM

check with any model RR site...around here it is Litchfield Station

Bear "It's all about having fun."

  • Member since
    December, 2015
  • 2,466 posts
Posted by BigDaddy on Sunday, February 11, 2018 2:56 PM

You're assuming you can find someone in Home Depot that you could ask and would know.

Modular Plug Crimping Tool (terminal crimping tools do not do modular plugs)

https://www.amazon.com/dp/B01EIJY4YQ/ref=sspa_dk_detail_6?psc=1&pd_rd_i=B01EIJY4YQ&pd_rd_wg=fPvmZ&pd_rd_r=VE4ZA3W95HP6X4PMDARR&pd_rd_w=Jz2DG

Henry

COB Potomac & Northern

By the Chesapeake Bay

  • Member since
    July, 2006
  • From: North Dakota
  • 7,659 posts
Posted by BroadwayLion on Sunday, February 11, 2018 3:03 PM

Call it a CAT-5 plug tool.

As of the LION, him buys his cable and tools from Cables to Go... Now just called C2G.

When I wanted 25 conductor CAT-3 cable, I googled just that and found a place that would sell such cables in any length I required.

Maybe I should have gone for 50 pair Cat-3. It sure is cheaper than buying individual coils or spools of 22 ga solid wire.

 

Anyway, This is the tool you want.

 

ROAR

The Route of the Broadway Lion The Largest Subway Layout in North Dakota.

Here there be cats.                                LIONS with CAMERAS

  • Member since
    September, 2003
  • 5,086 posts
Posted by Overmod on Sunday, February 11, 2018 3:27 PM

There is a really big issue here that we're just getting around to by crimping plugs onto wire.  Most modular cables aren't intended for repeated twisting and pulling, of the sort you'll be familiar with if you or your significant other paces and turns while on the phone.

There is a similar issue regarding the little plastic tab that holds the modular connector engaged.  

 

What we we need to start discussing is proper strain relief, either incorporated in the cable or accomplished with a hook or clamp of some kind that takes the stresses from walking around without allowing bending or pullout of the wire conductors.

i used a dollop of thinned epoxy or adhesive caulk to provide the effect of a strain relief.  There are some kinds of radio plug that are explicitly used to provide internal physical strain relief for four conductors, and while those might need a foot of some sort of tubing to give smooth action when pulled on 'obliquely' they might be considered.

I'm sure some of you have VERY good solutions for ruggedized modular connectors ... and for fixing the little contact spring wires when a cord gets ripped loose.

  • Member since
    September, 2004
  • From: Dearborn Station
  • 16,843 posts
Posted by richhotrain on Sunday, February 11, 2018 3:59 PM

bearman

Has anyone installed a UTP in only 3/16" hardboard or in 1/4" plywood?  

Apparently not.

Rich

Alton Junction

  • Member since
    July, 2006
  • From: Phoenix, AZ
  • 1,085 posts
Posted by bearman on Sunday, February 11, 2018 4:14 PM

Rich, It looks like Big Daddy has done it.

Bear "It's all about having fun."

  • Member since
    January, 2008
  • 965 posts
Posted by saronaterry on Sunday, February 11, 2018 6:29 PM

I have my Digitrax UP's mounted to the 1/8" masonite hardboard I use for facia. They've been there around 8 years or more. No reinforcement. No problems.

Terry

Terry in NW Wisconsin

Queenbogey715 is my Youtube channel

Subscriber & Member Login

Login, or register today to interact in our online community, comment on articles, receive our newsletter, manage your account online and more!
Popular on ModelRailroader.com
Model Railroader Newsletter See all
Sign up for our FREE e-newsletter and get model railroad news in your inbox!
ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT

Search the Community

ADVERTISEMENT
Find us on Facebook