Subscriber & Member Login

Login, or register today to interact in our online community, comment on articles, receive our newsletter, manage your account online and more!

Power Plant Scene & Saturn V Rocket Launch Scene

2121 views
24 replies
1 rating 2 rating 3 rating 4 rating 5 rating
  • Member since
    February, 2009
  • 825 posts
Power Plant Scene & Saturn V Rocket Launch Scene
Posted by railandsail on Wednesday, February 07, 2018 5:29 PM

 


Old posting 2009
When I first returned to this hobby, I visited a number of modular railroad displays.

As I began to formulate some ideas that I did not see on many, or any occasions, two came to mind...as a diorama or modular section. I also thought these might be 'educational' to both kids and some adults. (There are a lot of folks that have no idea of where our electrical power comes from)

Power Plant Scene
A coal fired power plant with coal piles outside. Maybe a newer style turbine addition being added to one section. Across the river a newer nuclear plant under construction with all the attendant construction cranes and flatcar loads of transformers, etc. Plus bridges over the river, and spur tracks, etc.

Saturn V Launch Scene
I don't ever recall seeing such a scene. My interest grew from both growing up in that era and the lack of kids knowledge about it , (and some pics of liquid oxygen cars I'd seen). So I asked myself , "how did they get the liquid oxygen fuel into the Kennedy Center for the Saturn V moon rocket?". Turns out Florida East Coast RR was on some sort of managed strike at the time, so most of the fuel arrived by truck to be stored in big tanks under ground.

WELL, how about if we play with that history a bit and have fuel arrive by rail! ...the new transport age being assisted by the old transport age of railroad. Liquid oxygen cars bringing in the fuel for the Saturn rocket. And in a newer vein the solid rocket boosters being brought in for the Space Shuttle Rocket. Lots of switcher action with special NASA switchers, BIG models, etc.

Can you imagine the look in kids eyes when they saw a 5.5 foot high rocket (Saturn V in HO scale) on a diorama/module. Might make them want to learn more about this great accomplishment in our history, and consider science futures.

Only liquid Ox cars I ever saw were made in brass...and very expensive. I found that the 62 Athearn tank car was almost exactly the right size to kitbash...never finished, but started on two. (BTW, I have a sheet of printed plans I could send to anyone interested...or maybe I could post them over on a separate thread since they are 47 years old, Oct 1963
 
 
Well that posting is a little 'dated'. BLI came out with some MARVELOUS cryogenic tank cars I was talking about, made in plastic. I even purchased a few undecorated ones I could convert into NASA versions

The power plant subject came up on another thread just recently, and that is what prompted me to look back for this posting. I just don't recall seeing a lot of good power plant scenes that might cover a broad era of their use.

As I mentioned before not a lot of young folks even know where and how our electrical power comes from/is generated. I wanted to create a whole scene with the older style coal plant (with coal piles sitting along side the delivery tracks). then perhaps some ongoing construction to a portion of that plant with turbines sections (peaking and otherwise) being added to the plant.

Then over the river bridges (source of cooling waters),... a nuclear plant under construction. I had (have) collected lots of various transformer delivery train cars, and lots of various style construction cranes This could be a pretty exciting scene to visit, particularly with today's multiple flashing LED lights on construction equipment.

Don't think I'll have room for such a scene on my new layout, but it would be fun.
  • Member since
    September, 2003
  • 5,795 posts
Posted by Overmod on Wednesday, February 07, 2018 6:35 PM

I take it you know there is a 1/96 scale model of the Apollo launch stack, and a source on eBay who sells a scale tower kit to fit it...

 

i say you combine the space-exploration and nuclear aspects and build a working scale model of an Orion booster.  (Mike Lehman will tell you how it works if you need...)

  • Member since
    January, 2017
  • 2,202 posts
Posted by NWP SWP on Wednesday, February 07, 2018 6:50 PM

About a year ago in I believe Shreveport was probably the biggest crawler crane I have ever seen! It was actually more like a crawler crane with a tower crane on the two booms! Someday it'd be nice to model something like that...

Steven

Crooner, Imagineer, High School Graduate, living with Aspergers, President of the Republica Pacifica micronation,  President of the NWP-SWP System.

Hook'em Longhorns! 

  • Member since
    January, 2017
  • From: Southern Florida Gulf Coast
  • 2,559 posts
Posted by SeeYou190 on Wednesday, February 07, 2018 9:00 PM

I have never seen a Saturn V rocket scene, but that is too new for the STRATTON  GILLETTE anyway.

.

How about a Roswell Space Vehicle Recovery Scene? That fits in my time period.

.

 

.

This scene is on the Pasco County Club's Modular HO Layout.

.

-Kevin

.

Happily modeling the STRATTON & GILLETTE RAILROAD located in a world of plausible nonsense set in August, 1954.

  • Member since
    February, 2009
  • 825 posts
Posted by railandsail on Thursday, February 08, 2018 8:58 AM

Roswell scene,...that's funny :)

  • Member since
    February, 2009
  • 825 posts
Posted by railandsail on Thursday, February 08, 2018 9:00 AM

Can you imagine the look in kids eyes when they saw a 5.5 foot high rocket (Saturn V in HO scale) on a diorama/module. Might make them want to learn more about this great accomplishment in our history, and consider science futures, .... something we need more of in our future

  • Member since
    April, 2009
  • From: Staten Island NY
  • 1,373 posts
Posted by joe323 on Thursday, February 08, 2018 9:28 AM

railandsail

Can you imagine the look in kids eyes when they saw a 5.5 foot high rocket (Saturn V in HO scale) on a diorama/module. Might make them want to learn more about this great accomplishment in our history, and consider science futures, .... something we need more of in our future

 

yes I remember they sold plastic models about that size growing up.

Joe Staten Island West 

  • Member since
    February, 2008
  • From: Potomac Yard
  • 1,893 posts
Posted by NittanyLion on Thursday, February 08, 2018 9:48 AM

Saturn V stack is only four feet tall in HO scale. The Launch Umbilical Tower would be a hair over five.

The super huge lift vehicles are strange. They're both huge and small at the same time.

  • Member since
    January, 2014
  • 695 posts
Posted by ROBERT PETRICK on Thursday, February 08, 2018 9:54 AM

NittanyLion

Saturn V stack is only four feet tall in HO scale. The Launch Umbilical Tower would be a hair over five.

The super huge lift vehicles are strange. They're both huge and small at the same time.

True, but that's four or five feet starting at the floor. Put such a thing on even low benchwork and it tops out at eight or nine feet. Ceiling height in a tall room; too high for most basements. 

Robert 

LINK to SNSR Blog


  • Member since
    December, 2004
  • From: Rimrock, Arizona
  • 10,746 posts
Posted by SpaceMouse on Thursday, February 08, 2018 10:04 AM

railandsail
Can you imagine the look in kids eyes when they saw a 5.5 foot high rocket (Saturn V in HO scale) on a diorama/module

Kinda the look I'm gong for with my Rock Ridge Railroad in the Redwoods. I figure they should be plus feet high. I'm probably going to limit them to 2 feet. 

The Rock Ridge Credo:

Small trains, Big trees. 

Chip

Building the Rock Ridge Railroad with the slowest construction crew west of the Pecos.

  • Member since
    January, 2015
  • From: Southern California
  • 1,321 posts
Posted by Lone Wolf and Santa Fe on Thursday, February 08, 2018 12:52 PM

    Cape Canaveral is at sea level so I guess you could put it on the floor. Just kidding. But a scaled down version might work. When I was a kid in the 1970s I had an Apollo model which was close to HO scale. It might have been slightly smaller like 1/90. It had the capsule, the lunar lander and the stage the lunar lander was stored in. You could use something like that an not have all the stages.
    Another thought is that the space shuttle might be an idea because it wasn’t nearly as tall.

Modeling a fictional version of California set in the 1990s Lone Wolf and Santa Fe Railroad
  • Member since
    February, 2009
  • 825 posts
Posted by railandsail on Thursday, February 08, 2018 1:34 PM

Been so long ago I've forgotten were I came up with that +5' figure for the Atlas Saturn V rocket.  I think there was a model of this rocket that was somewhat close to HO scale, but long out of production at the time I was thinking of it originally, and certainly now. But a tall cylindrical rocket like that shouldn't be that difficult to model.

As far as ceiling heights I figure it should make a nice 'module' for the train shows circuit.

I once had the occasion to visit the old storage building for the Air & Space museum out in suburban MD. In that 'mess of stuff' I spotted a metal model of the the test stand utilized down in Alabama for the original testing of those BIG rocket engines on that Saturn V. It looked to be made of brass, and was in a sorry state of neglect and needing repair. But it appeared to be HO scale. I kept wondering how I might ever fanagle that item from them.

  • Member since
    August, 2003
  • From: Collinwood, Ohio, USA
  • 5,953 posts
Posted by gmpullman on Thursday, February 08, 2018 4:35 PM

If you decide to make a Crawler Transporter, which I'm sure you would want in order to move your launch platform around the layout, be sure to plan on a sound decoder for it.

Loksound already has you covered since it is powered by a pair of Alco 251-C diesels:

 Alco_Nasa by Edmund, on Flickr

That's the 251 on the left Whistling

Cheers, Ed

  • Member since
    May, 2010
  • 3,163 posts
Posted by mbinsewi on Thursday, February 08, 2018 5:10 PM

gmpullman
That's the 251 on the left Whistling

Oh OK!  Now I see it.  Missed it the first second and third times.  Smile, Wink & Grin

Mike.

  • Member since
    January, 2017
  • From: Southern Florida Gulf Coast
  • 2,559 posts
Posted by SeeYou190 on Thursday, February 08, 2018 9:26 PM

NASA should give me a call. We need to repower that beast with a pair of top-of-the-line QSK95 Tier 4 engines.

.

-Kevin

.

Happily modeling the STRATTON & GILLETTE RAILROAD located in a world of plausible nonsense set in August, 1954.

  • Member since
    February, 2009
  • 825 posts
Posted by railandsail on Friday, February 09, 2018 7:46 AM

Didn't think the rocket itself was going to be that difficult to model, but the support tower itself was going to be a bear.

  • Member since
    February, 2002
  • From: Reading, PA
  • 24,624 posts
Posted by rrinker on Friday, February 09, 2018 8:34 AM

 Scale size, the Saturn V and the crawler will pretty much fill your shed. I know the Lego Saturn V I put together is over 3' tall and it's much smalelr than HO scale. It's a HUGE piece of machinery - and yet the crawler is even BIGGER.

                                 --Randy

 


Modeling the Reading Railroad in the 1950's

 

Visit my web site at www.readingeastpenn.com for construction updates, DCC Info, and more.

  • Member since
    February, 2009
  • 825 posts
Posted by railandsail on Friday, February 09, 2018 9:41 AM

@Randy,
I had no ideas about putting such a scene in my shed layout. Just though it might be an interesting diorama for a module set up at train shows, open houses, etc

  • Member since
    February, 2008
  • From: Potomac Yard
  • 1,893 posts
Posted by NittanyLion on Friday, February 09, 2018 12:06 PM

rrinker

 Scale size, the Saturn V and the crawler will pretty much fill your shed. I know the Lego Saturn V I put together is over 3' tall and it's much smalelr than HO scale. It's a HUGE piece of machinery - and yet the crawler is even BIGGER.

                                 --Randy

 

 

Crawler isn't much larger than a two sheets of good old letter paper.  "Only" 18x15 or so.

The major rub I see is that the pad itself is monstrous.  A rail served fueling complex at a launch facility would be...gigantic, even if its just a handful of cars at a time.  

This sounds counter-intituitive, but all the moving objects you'd have in a Saturn V launch module would be on par with things we already build models of without really batting an eye (although they are often centerpieces).  Big roundhouses, ore docks, any sort of ship at a pier, all that stuff is the same size or bigger.

  • Member since
    January, 2015
  • From: Southern California
  • 1,321 posts
Posted by Lone Wolf and Santa Fe on Friday, February 09, 2018 12:11 PM

I found a model on eBay: Revell Apollo Saturn V, 1:96 scale Rocket Model Kit. It is 114cm high. That is 45 inches.

If you scratchbuilt the assembly building or the launch pad it would make a very nice display for a show.

Modeling a fictional version of California set in the 1990s Lone Wolf and Santa Fe Railroad
  • Member since
    February, 2009
  • 825 posts
Posted by railandsail on Friday, February 09, 2018 2:24 PM

Delivering Cyrogenic Fuels to Rocket Launch Sites

Interesting discussion I just ran across, and with photos, and even a particular site in the world where the rocket fuels are delivered by railcar
https://space.stackexchange.com/questions/9110/how-are-cryogenic-rocket-propellants-delivered-to-the-launch-pad

I need to come back and look more closely when I have a bit more time.

  • Member since
    February, 2009
  • 825 posts
Posted by railandsail on Friday, February 09, 2018 2:27 PM

I do seem to recall seeing a a few Liquid Oxygen tanks like this at the Cape,...oops, can't post them on this site initially

 

  • Member since
    February, 2002
  • From: Reading, PA
  • 24,624 posts
Posted by rrinker on Friday, February 09, 2018 5:22 PM

 Similar theme appears years ago in MR, the railroad was used to move elements of an array of radio telescopes. 

                                         --Randy

 


Modeling the Reading Railroad in the 1950's

 

Visit my web site at www.readingeastpenn.com for construction updates, DCC Info, and more.

  • Member since
    February, 2009
  • 825 posts
Posted by railandsail on Friday, February 16, 2018 7:05 AM

Saturn V Rocket Model

Just ran across this model about as close to HO scale as I think there was,...1/72

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0...oop_bw_c_x_2_w

Dragon Models Saturn V with Skylab (1/72 Scale)

The 1/72 scale plastic kit of a Saturn V rocket (Item No.11017) created a huge buzz among space aficionados! Even in miniature form, it was absolutely enormous as the completed model stood an unbelievable 1.5m tall. It was highly praised for its level of detail too. As the longest, heaviest and most powerful rocket ever produced, the original Saturn V stood 110.6m high and had a diameter of 10.1m. The Saturn V was at the heart of NASA's Apollo and Skylab programs. The Saturn V's last ever use was the launch of Skylab (mission SL-1) on 14 May 1973, where the upper stage was replaced to accommodate this early space station. Owners of Dragon's Saturn V rocket will cause jaws to drop, while the finished model will without fail draw gasps of astonishment from onlookers! This is the second monstrous 1/72 scale kit of this rocket type and it comes with brand new tooling. The most obvious difference is the upper stage, which employed an S-IVB stage from a Saturn IB rocket. What's especially significant about that this part is that half of it is made of transparent plastic to allow viewers to see Skylab nestled neatly inside. All relevant details are carefully reproduced on the two rocket stages and Skylab and the model comes with accurate and large decals to provide relevant markings. This Saturn V kit will be a centerpiece of any space fan's collection and as such it comes with a stable circular base to allow it to stand stably on the floor.
  • Member since
    February, 2009
  • 825 posts
Posted by railandsail on Friday, February 16, 2018 7:07 AM

Some other discussions and photos of trains at the Cape

http://www.modelrailroadforums.com/forum/showthread.php?20815-NASA-Railroad/page2

Subscriber & Member Login

Login, or register today to interact in our online community, comment on articles, receive our newsletter, manage your account online and more!

Users Online

There are no community member online

Search the Community

ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT
Model Railroader Newsletter See all
Sign up for our FREE e-newsletter and get model railroad news in your inbox!