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white glue

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  • Member since
    January, 2018
  • 11 posts
white glue
Posted by airtrain on Friday, January 12, 2018 1:42 AM

Hi everyone. I am new to this forum and returning to the hobby after 25 years away. I am just starting on the scenery aspect and everything I read tells me to use white glue in one way or another. My question is, is therea difference in these products or is anything that says white glue good to go? Any help you can give would be greatly appreciated. Thanks for your help

  • Member since
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  • From: Southeast Texas
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Posted by mobilman44 on Friday, January 12, 2018 9:17 AM

Welcome to the Forum!

Folks here know just about anything related to scale railroading, so don't be leery of asking questions.

I prefer using a mix of white glue, water, and a dab of dish soap or alcohol for scenery applications.  Elmers or the like works just great.  There is no need for anything more expensive than that.  

 

ENJOY  !

 

Mobilman44

 

Living in southeast Texas, modeling the "postwar" Santa Fe and Illinois Central 

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    January, 2009
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Posted by RR_Mel on Friday, January 12, 2018 10:03 AM

Welcome

I bought a gallon of Elmer’s Glue All about 10 years ago for about $8 and I’m down to a half of a gallon today.  For ground flocking I use a 1:8 mix, 1 glue to 8 water.  I use both a sprayer and a squeeze bottles to apply the glue.
 
I pre wet ballast with 70% alcohol to prevent it from floating then the 1:8 glue.
 
I use beauty supply squeeze bottles for applying the glue mix as well as scenery flocking.  They also work good for ballast and gravel/road material.
 
 
They work very good for pinpoint applications.  I cut the nozzles to make the holes larger as needed.
 
 
The glue is ten years old and still going strong, took this picture night before last.
 
Mel
 
Modeling the early to mid 1950s SP in HO scale since 1951
  
 
My Model Railroad   
 
Bakersfield, California
 
I'm beginning to realize that aging is not for wimps.
 
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Posted by rrebell on Friday, January 12, 2018 10:34 AM

This is a case of traditional vs new ways and both have a point. The real anwser is what are you trying to do and how do you plan to do it. Example: ballasting, traditonal is deluted white glue, vs matt medium. White glue is cheap, holds well but is more water soluable which means it is easier to salvage track but may change color over time and can have more of a sheen to it. Matt medium, more expencive, holds well but is less water soluable and won't discolor and unless you soak it for a long time things like salvaging track is harder (but can be done by soaking it). It is an artist material and is ment to be longtime stable and no shine. Now because of the different formulas matt medium is only about 20% more expencive and but harder to screw up.

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Posted by rrinker on Friday, January 12, 2018 1:10 PM

 Pretty much all white glue is the same, but I stick with Elmer's. Craft stores and home improvement stores have it in gallon jugs, cheaper than buying the small bottles.

                                    --Randy


Modeling the Reading Railroad in the 1950's

 

Visit my web site at www.readingeastpenn.com for construction updates, DCC Info, and more.

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  • From: New England
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Posted by Jumijo on Friday, January 12, 2018 5:39 PM

White glue is the most underutilized glue in this hobby, and CA glue is the most overutilized. It seems to me that the vast majority of modelers use CA every time they need things stuck together, no matter how permanent or damaging the union may be. I see them gluing passengers into car seats with CA, parts onto locos with CA, and on and on, and on. CA glue leaves a residue that cannot be easily undone. Glue those parts with craft glue or white glue. If need be, they can be removed with no damage to anything with just a little water. Glue plastic to plastic with a glue that will weld the parts together. The resulting joint will be stronger than if CA was used. Using the appropriate glue will result in better modeling.

Modeling the Baltimore waterfront in HO scale

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Posted by rrinker on Friday, January 12, 2018 6:46 PM

 I wouldn;t say underutilized, since white glue is used for pretty much ALL scenery work. But maybe it's gotten drilled in to peoples' heads that white glue is for scenery, not for the models. But you're right, there are many other palces white glue makes sense. Just about anything you want to stay together and not fall apart yet might want to go back and change is a good candidate for white glue. Even surfaces it doesn't really bond well with - it will still keep things in place against accidently seperation but if you deliberately attempt to remove the object, it will pop right off with no damage to either surface.

                                  --Randy

 


Modeling the Reading Railroad in the 1950's

 

Visit my web site at www.readingeastpenn.com for construction updates, DCC Info, and more.

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  • From: Southern Florida Gulf Coast
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Posted by SeeYou190 on Friday, January 12, 2018 7:57 PM

I was pretty much sold on Elmer's Glue All until the words "NEW STRONGER FORMULA" showed up on the bottles about a year ago.

.

These bottles seperate if you do not use them right away with a thin, milky seperation at the top. I cannot seem to get them to mix back together again. This has been a problem with 4 ounce bottles through 1 gallon jugs.

.

I believe I will be switching to Aleen's Matt Mod Podge for scenery work.

.

-Kevin

.

Happily modeling the STRATTON & GILLETTE RAILROAD located in a world of plausible nonsense set in August, 1954.

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Posted by floridaflyer on Friday, January 12, 2018 8:13 PM

Elmers also makes a white glue called Elmers school glue. Recommend that you do not use that.

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Posted by SeeYou190 on Friday, January 12, 2018 8:57 PM

floridaflyer
Elmers also makes a white glue called Elmers school glue. Recommend that you do not use that.

.

Also avoid Elmer's all purpose clear glue. 

.

-Kevin

.

Happily modeling the STRATTON & GILLETTE RAILROAD located in a world of plausible nonsense set in August, 1954.

  • Member since
    January, 2004
  • From: Canada, eh?
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Posted by doctorwayne on Friday, January 12, 2018 9:33 PM

The last bottle of white glue which I purchased was a generic brand from either Home Depot or Lowes, or from Walmart - sixteen bucks for a gallon.  The last time I bought matte medium, many years ago, it was about $12.00 for 8oz.  The performance of either for scenic work is similar with regards to holding power, but, as mentioned, matte medium is more difficult to "undo".  I noticed absolutely no difference in the sound deadening qualities. 
I've also taken up ballasted track and turnouts in several places, and all track components were completely re-useable.

I've already gone through almost three gallons of white glue on this layout, and no complaints about any brand I've used.

Wayne

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Posted by airtrain on Friday, January 12, 2018 11:59 PM
Thanks to everyone for your advice.Now all I have to do is get some glue and get to work. Hopefully this is where the railroad starts to look like something real.
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Posted by rrinker on Saturday, January 13, 2018 12:27 PM

 I did the same experiment on the sections I ballasted on my last layout. There was no detectable difference going from the track with the ballast secured by plain old Elmer's white glue diluted with alcohol, and the section I did with dilute matte medium. 

 I learned a long time ago,t he drop of dish soap and water to dilute either glue or matte medium, or to use as a wetting agent prior to applying the glue, does not work here. The water is too hard. I spray on 70% isopropyl as the wetting agent and I dilute the glue with 70% isopropyl as well. As I drip it on, it truly just disappears into the ballast and there is never any puddling. It might work if I went to the store and bought jugs of distilled water, but 70% alcohol isn't expensive. Something I noticed when excess dried int he bottom of the cup I mixed it in - 70% and white glue never seems to dry solid like a blob of white glue, it stays kind of rubbery. Probably a reaction of the PVA with the alcohol. ANd also why there's no sound difference compared to matte medium - the alcohol/glue is less than rock hard just like the matte medium.

                               --Randy

 


Modeling the Reading Railroad in the 1950's

 

Visit my web site at www.readingeastpenn.com for construction updates, DCC Info, and more.

  • Member since
    July, 2006
  • From: west coast
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Posted by rrebell on Sunday, January 14, 2018 1:06 PM

doctorwayne

The last bottle of white glue which I purchased was a generic brand from either Home Depot or Lowes, or from Walmart - sixteen bucks for a gallon.  The last time I bought matte medium, many years ago, it was about $12.00 for 8oz.  The performance of either for scenic work is similar with regards to holding power, but, as mentioned, matte medium is more difficult to "undo".  I noticed absolutely no difference in the sound deadening qualities. 
I've also taken up ballasted track and turnouts in several places, and all track components were completely re-useable.

I've already gone through almost three gallons of white glue on this layout, and no complaints about any brand I've used.

Wayne

 

Prices have changed, checked curant Blick prices before comenting. 

  • Member since
    January, 2017
  • From: Southern Florida Gulf Coast
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Posted by SeeYou190 on Sunday, January 14, 2018 1:18 PM

rrinker
I learned a long time ago,t he drop of dish soap and water to dilute either glue or matte medium, or to use as a wetting agent prior to applying the glue, does not work here. The water is too hard.

.

We have legendarily hard water here. I will not get a softener. I hate slimey water!

.

Anyway, I thin my glue with distilled water and use Kodak Photo-Flo 200 as a wetting agent. Distilled water is only 59 cents a gallon. Well worth it.

.

-Kevin

.

Happily modeling the STRATTON & GILLETTE RAILROAD located in a world of plausible nonsense set in August, 1954.

  • Member since
    January, 2014
  • 666 posts
Posted by ROBERT PETRICK on Sunday, January 14, 2018 1:52 PM

floridaflyer

Elmers also makes a white glue called Elmers school glue. Recommend that you do not use that.

I second this. I tried it once, but it doesn't dilute and thin out like regular Elmer's white glue (or interior yellow glue). It gets stringy and gel-y, like tapioca.

Robert

LINK to SNSR Blog


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