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the virginian 4 x 8 plan for coal mining vs other plans

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  • Member since
    January, 2018
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the virginian 4 x 8 plan for coal mining vs other plans
Posted by dentlfly on Monday, January 01, 2018 9:16 AM

i am new to this hobby. my father in law retired w. Virginia coalminer. like the virginian plan. are there other coal mining plans that are detailed to build like the virginian? is the virginian too much to tackle for newbie? thanks.

ed

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Posted by Billwiz on Friday, January 05, 2018 9:14 AM

Happy New Year,

Most 4 x 8 plans are good starting points for "newbies" (and there are other options available other than a 4 x 8).  The Viriginian is a nice plan and I would say go for it.  No matter the plan, take your time and learn as you go.

 

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Posted by 7j43k on Friday, January 05, 2018 11:47 AM

I agree with Bill, above.

I'll concur that my recollection of that layout is that it had an excellent design--something difficult to pull off in 4 x 8.

 

Ed

 

 

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Posted by Doughless on Friday, January 05, 2018 12:23 PM

Google search Turtle Creek Central Track Plan, or use the MR database.  It consists of two MR project layouts, so there is a 2x6 appendage for the actual mine.

Its on one grade and has less track than the Virginian and should be easier to build.  The loop could be modified to include a marshalling yard like in the Virginian, which makes operations more interesting.

- Douglas

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Posted by mbinsewi on Friday, January 05, 2018 12:51 PM

I always liked the Virginian.  There are sooooo many track plans out there.  I thought this plan was cool too!  It's the Feb., 2011 MRR. 

http://mrr.trains.com/how-to/track-plan-database/2010/12/rosston-joelberg-holly-rr--csx-branch-line

Mike.

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Posted by DigitalGriffin on Saturday, January 06, 2018 8:24 PM

The Virginian is MRR's most popular starter track plan that I know of.  There's even a couple threads dedicated to it.

-Don

Don - Specializing in layout DC->DCC conversions

Modeling C&O transition era and steel industries There's Nothing Like Big Steam!

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Posted by dentlfly on Saturday, January 06, 2018 10:04 PM

thanks. its a cool looking layout. where would i find the thread dedicated to it?

 

ed

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    July, 2007
  • From: Massachusetts
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Posted by Bundy74 on Sunday, January 07, 2018 7:14 AM

The Virginian is perhaps the most detailed, and well thought out project layout MR has done, IMO.  As for building it as a beginner, perhaps start with one of the extensions instead of the main layout.  The Turtle Creek extension, which was used as Kelly on the Virginian is pretty simple, and would be a good starting point.  It's also smaller, so size isn't as intimidating. 

If you're not on it already, I'd recommend MR Video Plus.  You can watch all the videos about the Virginian, and the Thin Branch project too.  

Modeling whatever I can make out of that stash of kits that takes up half my apartment's spare bedroom.

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Posted by WVWoodman on Sunday, January 07, 2018 7:21 AM

I helped work on the Virginian layout with a club in WV -  it is difficult and too narrow.  Widen it to about 5 1/2 feet and take out the two curved peko switches and place the crossover  where the weighin platform is located and it would work much better.  

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Posted by Doughless on Sunday, January 07, 2018 8:16 AM

WVWoodman

I helped work on the Virginian layout with a club in WV -  it is difficult and too narrow.  Widen it to about 5 1/2 feet and take out the two curved peko switches and place the crossover  where the weighin platform is located and it would work much better.  

 

That is my take on the plan too.  Its probably not for the beginner since I think it requires a lot of precision in order for the marshalling yard and the scenic divider to fit on the 4x8 realistically.

Its probably why the OP asked for alternatives that are simpler.

- Douglas

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Posted by IRONROOSTER on Tuesday, January 09, 2018 1:03 AM

If you don't have the original series of articles on building it, get the special issue Build a Small Model Railroad listed above under special issues where they are reprinted.

While this might be considerd an advanced beginner project, I think you could build this as a first layout.  Because it is a very packed layout, I would follow the construction articles in building it.  Use exactly what commercial trackage they used, even small deviations can make it difficult or impossible to fit it all in.  Buildings can be a little different, but watch the footprint as there isn't much room for them.

Good luck

Paul

If you're having fun, you're doing it the right way.
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Posted by rrinker on Tuesday, January 09, 2018 7:15 AM

 Since they have the book, and/or the back issues and/or MRVP to refer to for construction, the Virginian, while not the easiest layout, is VERY well documented with fairly step by step instructions. I'd say it's easier for a beginner to build than a slightly simpler plan that is lacking all that documentation.

                                  --Randy

 


Modeling the Reading Railroad in the 1950's

 

Visit my web site at www.readingeastpenn.com for construction updates, DCC Info, and more.

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Posted by wazoo12345 on Tuesday, January 09, 2018 10:12 AM

I actually built the Virginian, though I repurposed it to create my version of the Georgia Northeastern. The trickiest thing was getting the track plan right. I ended up laying it all out in AnyRail, and I never did get the tracks to line up 100% where the two curved turnouts create a cross over by the rail yard. Of course, this was my first attempt after having taken a 40 year hiatus. If you are patient it will all work out. You would be better served to go with a slightly larger table top, 4 x 8 is very tight and was a big part of my struggle as well. 

Overall I was very pleased with the results. I would recommend reviewing the articles in the series, as well as watch the videos, especially the ones on laying the track.

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Posted by peahrens on Tuesday, January 09, 2018 10:25 AM

I used the Virginian project techniques for my different cookie cutter layout.  The articles were early 2012 IIRC.  And the videos are good also.  I think those can be viewed without Video Plus subscription.

The benchwork approach is nice.  And the stages of track laying, painting, sceney, etc. are helpful.

Paul

Modeling HO with a transition era UP bent

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Posted by mbinsewi on Tuesday, January 09, 2018 12:02 PM

Yep, the articles started in the Jan., 2012 issue, with an overview of the project, and the operations, and the bench work and nitty gritty starts with the Feb. issue, and continues on each month.

Videos started in Nov., 2011.  On the black bar at the top of the page, hoover over videos, click on Project layouts, in the column on the left.

I'm not sure, but if you are a magazine subscriber, you should be able to watch them.

Mike.

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