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HO Scale Building Windows

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  • Member since
    January, 2003
  • From: Ridgeville,South Carolina
  • 1,120 posts
HO Scale Building Windows
Posted by willy6 on Monday, September 04, 2017 3:45 PM

What can I use to frost or distort plastic windows allowing light to penetrate like the ones in a bathroom at a cheap motel?

trains
  • Member since
    July, 2006
  • From: Bradford, Ontario
  • 7,666 posts
Posted by hon30critter on Monday, September 04, 2017 3:57 PM

Testors Dullcote works well. You can buy it in bottles or spray cans.

https://www.walmart.com/ip/Testors-Spray-Paint-Dullcote-Clear-3-oz/22056097

You can use it for a variety of applications where you want to take the gloss off of a model, or seal in weathering powders (note that it will reduce the effect of the weathering so that you will need to apply the weathering powders a bit heavier to start with).

Dave

  • Member since
    January, 2017
  • From: Southern Florida Gulf Coast
  • 1,026 posts
Posted by SeeYou190 on Monday, September 04, 2017 3:59 PM

Either Testor's Dullcoat as suggested by HOn30critter, or Vallejo's water effects.

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I think one of these would work very well.

.

-Kevin

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Happily modeling the STRATTON & GILLETTE RAILROAD located in a world of plausible nonsense set in August, 1954.

  • Member since
    January, 2004
  • From: Canada, eh?
  • 7,593 posts
Posted by doctorwayne on Monday, September 04, 2017 4:18 PM

If your window "glass" is plastic, another option is to distress what will become the inside face of the glass using fairly fine sandpaper.  No mess or smell, and a small piece of sandpaper will do a lot of windows.  I've used both the Dulcote and sandpaper methods, the latter mostly for passenger car washrooms.  I usually cut the windows from a partial sheet of pre-sanded clear styrene, as the bigger piece is easier to sand than the individual windows...

Wayne

  • Member since
    July, 2006
  • From: Bradford, Ontario
  • 7,666 posts
Posted by hon30critter on Monday, September 04, 2017 11:23 PM

doctorwayne
another option is to distress what will become the inside face of the glass using fairly fine sandpaper.

Wayne:

You do realize that your inexpensive and effective solutions are not helping the economy much, don't you. Some poor child may have to go without their Fruit Loops cereal because daddy's pay cheque was short! (Probably a good thing for the kid though - builds character and saves teeth too!)Smile, Wink & GrinLaughLaughLaughLaugh

Sorry, couldn't resist.

Cheers!!

Dave

  • Member since
    January, 2004
  • From: Canada, eh?
  • 7,593 posts
Posted by doctorwayne on Tuesday, September 05, 2017 10:18 AM

hon30critter
...You do realize that your inexpensive and effective solutions are not helping the economy much, don't you....

Actually, I'm trying to help my own economy, as I'm selling sandpaper! Stick out tongue

Well, perhaps trying to sell sandpaper might be more accurate.  I have an ad on Kijiji for various types of sandpaper (most of it not suited to creating frosted glass), but am getting very little response - it seems most folks don't do much of their own home improvement work...probably the same guys who don't build kits.  Laugh

I came into a large quantity of sandpaper some years ago, as part of a house purchase.  The wet/dry stuff went to an automotive supply place (literally, a pick-up truck box-full), and I sold a lot of the rest (mostly cloth-backed) to guys at work.  
Maybe I should use what's left to wallpaper my workshop. Smile, Wink & Grin

Wayne

  • Member since
    November, 2016
  • 176 posts
Posted by j. c. on Tuesday, September 05, 2017 11:16 AM

i'll agree with wayne sanding is best if you want  the frosted look , but if you want semi frosted look i took a sheet of clear and filled airbrush with laqure thinner and misted it  resulting  what looks like crinkle glass(thats what i call it) , then on one sheet i laid a hunk of dark brown tule (bridel veil) on sheet and sprayed with thinner while still soft  lain a hunk of glass on it and pressed tule into sheet to make chicken wire glass.

 

o by the way wayne the corser stuff  can be used for non slip patches

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