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Interesting bridge to model

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Interesting bridge to model
Posted by SouthPenn on Sunday, May 07, 2017 12:50 PM

Looks like a bridge inside of a bridge.

South Penn
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Posted by DSchmitt on Sunday, May 07, 2017 1:00 PM

It is.

Rock Island Bridge across Columbia River in Washington. Built by Great Northern in 1892.  Structure strengthed in 1925 by adding outside truss frame. 

http://www.bigbendrailroadhistory.com/2013/05/1926-strengthening-rock-island-bridge.html

 

 

HO scale model

http://micro-scale.com/product/bnsf-rock-island-bridge/

 

I tried to sell my two cents worth, but no one would give me a plug nickel for it.

I don't have a leg to stand on.

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Posted by tomikawaTT on Sunday, May 07, 2017 3:28 PM

That bridge, like the Hell Gate in New York, is a location-specific one-of-a-kind that sets the location simply by existing.  Essential for anyone modeling the Columbia River, out of place anywhere else.

Interesting that train tonnages rose so much in the early 20th century that such a massive upgrade was found necessary.  OTOH, most rail bridges were designed VERY conservatively.

Chuck (Modeling Central Japan in September, 1964 - without iconic bridges)

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Posted by 7j43k on Sunday, May 07, 2017 3:53 PM

tomikawaTT

That bridge, like the Hell Gate in New York, is a location-specific one-of-a-kind that sets the location simply by existing.  Essential for anyone modeling the Columbia River, out of place anywhere else.

 

The Columbia is pretty long.  I'm modeling a bit west of Wishram, and don't NEED that bridge.  But if I did, I could just get my checkbook out and buy an OMI one:

 

 

Here's one of my favorite railroad bridges:

 

 

It's at Auburn, CA.  It was originally a typical steel tower-trestle span:

 

 

 When Highway 80 went through, they took out the center bunch of towers and put in the bridge.  The especially neat thing is they left the trestle behind at each end.

 

Ed

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Posted by MisterBeasley on Sunday, May 07, 2017 7:21 PM

Somebody has to say it.  Isn't every bridge interesting to model?

It takes an iron man to play with a toy iron horse. 

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Posted by mbinsewi on Sunday, May 07, 2017 9:50 PM

Yea, Mr. Beasley, they all are, but, the OP's bridge is an excellent example of creative engineering, specific to the location, as Chuck says.  Ed's bridge is totally cool!  That is also an excellent example of creative engineering!  And for a history buff like me, to see a picture of the bridge, and seeing that dirt road turn into I-80, is as interesting as it gets !  And the structure, a bridge under a bridge, is also as good as it gets.  That could be modeled using many different locations, and situations.

Mike.

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Posted by tomikawaTT on Monday, May 08, 2017 1:30 PM

MisterBeasley

Somebody has to say it.  Isn't every bridge interesting to model?

Every bridge is interesting to model, but some are more interesting than others.

Even cookie-cut preassembled deck girder spans delivered to site on flat cars become unique when placed a certain way on piers and abutments built on-site to meet that site's requirements.  The JNR used to keep samples of the most common sizes used for highway overpasses at Haijima, a short walk from my home at the time.

Of course, deck girders are dead easy to model, especially if only one side can be seen.  A rather short concrete open-spandrel arch on a curve is a tad more difficult, and a lot more interesting.  My need for truss bridges, fortunately, is covered by a couple of Atlas snap-trusses simulating late 19th century prototypes on my private coal hauler.  No place, or need, for humongubridges on my present layout - I don't cross any aisleways.

I once contemplated modeling the Hell Gate Bridge - until I learned that the total length of elevated structure was about 3 1/2 miles.  Selective compression, anyone?

Chuck (Modeling Central Japan in September, 1964 - with a lot of short bridges)

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Posted by hon30critter on Monday, May 08, 2017 11:02 PM

OK, I'm going to start scratchbuilding the OP's bridge first thing in the morning! I will used brass strips exclusively! Check back with me in 20 years when it's done!Smile, Wink & GrinLaughLaughLaughClown

Sorry, couldn't resist. Beautiful structure! I wonder what the OMI model is worth?

Dave

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Posted by 7j43k on Monday, May 08, 2017 11:36 PM

hon30critter

I wonder what the OMI model is worth?

Dave

 

 

The main span has been selling for $5000-$5200.

 

The main span plus the secondary span went for $6995:

https://www.brasstrains.com/Classic/Product/Detail/081616/HO-Brass-Model-OMI-3386-1-3387-1-GN-BN-BNSF-416-6-BRIDGE-IN-A-BRIDGE-250-Pratt-Deck-Truss-Bridge-F-P

 

Ed

 

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Posted by hon30critter on Tuesday, May 09, 2017 12:07 AM

7j43k
The main span plus the secondary span went for $6995:

OOH OWE HOT HOT HOT!!!!Whistling

Ed:

Thanks for the information. Now I know what league of modellers I'm in, and it certainly isn't in the same league with the person who bought that! Good to know where I standSmile, Wink & Grin.

Thanks,

Dave

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Posted by 7j43k on Tuesday, May 09, 2017 2:57 PM

Dave,

I dug out some old OMI catalogs.  That pair of bridges (unpainted) had a combined list price of $7343 in 2002.  Clearly the price is going DOWN.

Let's see.  It drops $344 every 15 years.  Yup.  Now all you have to do is extrapolate out to your "pay-point".  And, of course, start saving your dimes and nickels.

The time will FLY by, and you'll have that bridge.

 

And, at least for me, it would STILL be sooner than if I scratchbuilt it.

 

 

 

Ed

 

PS:  Hope it won't blow your budget, but there's a third bridge you have to get:  a deck girder approach listing at  only $929.

PPS:  The combined length of the three model bridges is 9'-4 1/4" (more or less), so you might want to think about redesigning your layout to allow for your potential upcoming purchase.  Also, in my case, that might possibly allow enough time to get done.

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Posted by hon30critter on Wednesday, May 10, 2017 12:55 AM

7j43k
Let's see.  It drops $344 every 15 years.  Yup.  Now all you have to do is extrapolate out to your "pay-point".  And, of course, start saving your dimes and nickels. The time will FLY by, and you'll have that bridge.   And, at least for me, it would STILL be sooner than if I scratchbuilt it.

LaughLaughLaughLaughLaugh

Talk about budgeting for the future!

I'm going to have several bridges on my layout but none of them will be straight. I'd have to take a big hammer to the OMI bridges to put the required curves into them.Smile, Wink & GrinLaughLaughClown

Cheers!!

Dave

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  • From: Seattle Area
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Posted by Capt. Grimek on Wednesday, May 10, 2017 6:55 PM

I've seen this bridge in person several times and it IS truly impressive and...extraordinary. I have drooled over that brass model version several times also, in the past.  If anyone here ever has the opportunity to drive the Columbia River's old hiway sections it's an impressive drive, with UP on one side of the river  and BNSF on the other, running pretty often alongside you.

Jim

Raised on the Erie Lackawanna Mainline- Supt. of the Black River Transfer & Terminal R.R.

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