Brainstorming -- Loco Resurrection Project

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  • Member since
    February, 2013
  • 309 posts
Brainstorming -- Loco Resurrection Project
Posted by PVT Kanaka on Wednesday, October 11, 2017 8:52 PM

Aloha,

 

Sitting here supervising math homework, so I thought I'd finally get these photos up.  Please note, that I try to only post questions if I plan to put the answers to immediate use.  In this case, due to parts availability and other priorities (food), it may be a while before ideas become actions.

Caveats aside, behold the remains of a '70-s vintage, battery powered LGB Model 2075, dubbed "Little Thomas," as he sits on the Triple O:

 and 

To boot, the rear loop coupler is broken and gone, but I know how to fix that, if poorly courtesy of damage to another loco! 

In addition to the obvious external damage, there are no interior details.  This will be a blank slate:

I am eyeing the market for a "beyond hope" Bachmann Annie to provide the missing external and internal detail parts.  I also am considerding grinding off the cast on piping and replacing with wire and cotter pins, but that is way in the future, and it will depend on how the project starts to come together.

Per discussions elswhere, the long leg and the driver of the project seems to be power.  I opened up "Little Thomas" to see if I could simply get a new motor and wheel set.  Nope. A burnt out Buehler won't sit in the hull.  See below:

I got the HLW block as a suggestion; however, at 12 V, my crew would fry it, so I'd have to trust my still crummy soldering skills to intall a homemade or purchased voltage limiter.

The end state, beyond the pure emotional satisfaction of seeing my first locomotive underway on its own power for the first time in 40 years, is to develop some useful modeling skills on an otherwise absolutely wrecked locomotive shell and end up with a credible representation fo a 3ft gauge ("PLAYMOBIL Scale") loco that might have worked Hawaii's plantations in the late 19th and early 20th centuries.  I am taking my guide off of both a functioning LGB m2075 and actual small engines from the late Kingdom / Early Republican period (Google "Oahu Land & Rail" for a nice stable of 0-6-0, 0-4-0, and other wheel configurations. No, I amnot going to attempt a curved saddle tank.).  Clearly, though, this is a freelance effort, and, as mentioned,  the power train will drive the finished wheel base and overall look.

Limitations:

1.) Cost of shipping.  The island's only hobby store has paints, but that is it, and shipping is ridiculous to the Islands.  After the power train, I'd like to source other parts to the hardware store or a single source for a one time purchase.   Free is good, too, and I've seen that on the "Busted Annie Market."

2.) Modeler's Ability.  I used to build really good 1:32 military models.  The last tank rolled off the line about 2000.  If this were SCUBA, I would need a "Rusty Diver Course."  No practical experience with soldering, drill presses, brass sheet, casting, you name it, only dimly remembered skills in gluing, sanding, detailing, painting, and weathering.  

3.) Modeler's Tools and Space.  Tools are limited to hand tools and a Dremel.  Assume no access to anything else.  Also, my lanai, which is our dining and entertainment ares, is also my work area, and all projects need to be beyond 0-2-0 reach between cracks at them.  Or impervious.  The first option is better.

4.) The railroad.  The Triple O has no grades, but, as the track floats on gravel does, the track does undulate.  In addition, all turns are LGB "R1," LGB's tightest radius, which I believe is 4ft. We have a number of LGB's European 0-4-0s that look really good, even a tram loco (our favorite), and we have a currently defunct 0-6-2T which has a pleasing, lumbering look.  Bachmann's 2-4-2 tends to not like our turn-outs and gets cranky with the undulations; our second hand "Annie" is gorgeous and a great runner but looks a bit big for the turns.

Again, this is sort of branstorming session. All is possible; all will be parts driven. I cannot promise a start date or rapid progress.  Still, I appreciate your thoughts in advance so that I can make good - or at least not bad - choices that will end up enriching the post office even more.

 

Mahalo!

Eric 

 

  • Member since
    February, 2015
  • 84 posts
Posted by chocho willy on Thursday, October 12, 2017 8:03 AM

Eric, good luck with your seach, I know in the major states at Christmas big box stores, Home Depot, Lowes, Walgreens, CVS, carry G size battery trains for the hoildays and after the holidays you usually can buy them pretty cheap, some run pretty good. HLW motor blocks are 18VDC and would work, be on the look out for 0-4-0 LGB blocks, their drivers are a little smaller. As far tools all I use is a set of hobby zona razor saws, small drill (battery powered) small drill bits and xacto knives. You should be able to get those at your hobby shop Good luck with your project, Bill

PVT Kanaka

Aloha,

 

Sitting here supervising math homework, so I thought I'd finally get these photos up.  Please note, that I try to only post questions if I plan to put the answers to immediate use.  In this case, due to parts availability and other priorities (food), it may be a while before ideas become actions.

Caveats aside, behold the remains of a '70-s vintage, battery powered LGB Model 2075, dubbed "Little Thomas," as he sits on the Triple O:

 and 

To boot, the rear loop coupler is broken and gone, but I know how to fix that, if poorly courtesy of damage to another loco! 

In addition to the obvious external damage, there are no interior details.  This will be a blank slate:

I am eyeing the market for a "beyond hope" Bachmann Annie to provide the missing external and internal detail parts.  I also am considerding grinding off the cast on piping and replacing with wire and cotter pins, but that is way in the future, and it will depend on how the project starts to come together.

Per discussions elswhere, the long leg and the driver of the project seems to be power.  I opened up "Little Thomas" to see if I could simply get a new motor and wheel set.  Nope. A burnt out Buehler won't sit in the hull.  See below:

I got the HLW block as a suggestion; however, at 12 V, my crew would fry it, so I'd have to trust my still crummy soldering skills to intall a homemade or purchased voltage limiter.

The end state, beyond the pure emotional satisfaction of seeing my first locomotive underway on its own power for the first time in 40 years, is to develop some useful modeling skills on an otherwise absolutely wrecked locomotive shell and end up with a credible representation fo a 3ft gauge ("PLAYMOBIL Scale") loco that might have worked Hawaii's plantations in the late 19th and early 20th centuries.  I am taking my guide off of both a functioning LGB m2075 and actual small engines from the late Kingdom / Early Republican period (Google "Oahu Land & Rail" for a nice stable of 0-6-0, 0-4-0, and other wheel configurations. No, I amnot going to attempt a curved saddle tank.).  Clearly, though, this is a freelance effort, and, as mentioned,  the power train will drive the finished wheel base and overall look.

Limitations:

1.) Cost of shipping.  The island's only hobby store has paints, but that is it, and shipping is ridiculous to the Islands.  After the power train, I'd like to source other parts to the hardware store or a single source for a one time purchase.   Free is good, too, and I've seen that on the "Busted Annie Market."

2.) Modeler's Ability.  I used to build really good 1:32 military models.  The last tank rolled off the line about 2000.  If this were SCUBA, I would need a "Rusty Diver Course."  No practical experience with soldering, drill presses, brass sheet, casting, you name it, only dimly remembered skills in gluing, sanding, detailing, painting, and weathering.  

3.) Modeler's Tools and Space.  Tools are limited to hand tools and a Dremel.  Assume no access to anything else.  Also, my lanai, which is our dining and entertainment ares, is also my work area, and all projects need to be beyond 0-2-0 reach between cracks at them.  Or impervious.  The first option is better.

4.) The railroad.  The Triple O has no grades, but, as the track floats on gravel does, the track does undulate.  In addition, all turns are LGB "R1," LGB's tightest radius, which I believe is 4ft. We have a number of LGB's European 0-4-0s that look really good, even a tram loco (our favorite), and we have a currently defunct 0-6-2T which has a pleasing, lumbering look.  Bachmann's 2-4-2 tends to not like our turn-outs and gets cranky with the undulations; our second hand "Annie" is gorgeous and a great runner but looks a bit big for the turns.

Again, this is sort of branstorming session. All is possible; all will be parts driven. I cannot promise a start date or rapid progress.  Still, I appreciate your thoughts in advance so that I can make good - or at least not bad - choices that will end up enriching the post office even more.

 

Mahalo!

Eric 

 

 

kitbashing 

Tags: kitbashing
  • Member since
    December, 2001
  • From: Smoggy L.A.
  • 10,678 posts
Posted by vsmith on Monday, October 16, 2017 2:09 PM

That...IMHO, is the absolute WORST excuse of locomotive ever foisted upon in any scale. I have two, one old 70s Big Bird Express (I only wanted the ore cars) and the recent FAO Schwartz version. Both are junk, I got the FAO version for $10, and it is identical mechanically to the junk 70s version, only with a remote control. The FAO can't pull itself around a loop without derailing every 4 feet, add cars and it derails every two feet or just stalls spinning it wheel. That this travesty of a toy came from LGB is appalling, I have had $15 Christmas Trains that were astronomically better and more reliable. I plan to keep only the upper shell and use an HLW Mack base and drive under both eventually. Good luck with this one, it's a real Turkey to start with.

    Have fun with your trains

  • Member since
    February, 2013
  • 309 posts
Posted by PVT Kanaka on Tuesday, October 17, 2017 1:00 AM

When I got it under the tree at age 4, it was the coolest thing in the world!  That being said, my kids got the Christmas version recently, and I have to concur that it was toy store quality at LGB price.  The sound system lasted about three months, and, frankly, the remote is iffy at best.  Still, it is a "ready go" train for them.

I have had several recommendation for the HLW "Mack" motor block, so that will probably be my starting point.  I may wait until my next Mainland foray to order one, so that I can pick it up and save on the shipping.  The thing has been dead for 4 decades, so there is no rush.  It can't get "more broke," so it seemed like a logical skill development project!

Eric

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