PLANS FOR RIDE ON BACK YARD TRAIN

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PLANS FOR RIDE ON BACK YARD TRAIN


  • I WANT TO BUILD A SMALL TRAIN IN MY BACK YARD, BIG ENOUGH TO PULL SEVERAL CARS AND HAUL AT LEAST 6 PEOPLE. I AM A PRETTY GOOD MECHANIC AND CARPENTER. WHERE CAN I FIND PLANS, PARTS, TRACK OR GET STARTED???
    THANKS,
    ERIC
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  • Eric, Not many of us (to my knowledge) are into riding garden railroads. But just the same[#welcome]

    You might find what you need at www.ridingrailkits.com I only know of them through their add in Garden Railways Magazine.

    Check'em out and I hope it's waht your looking for the scale size of these is 1 inch to the foot scale.
  • Now this is some BIG BOY TOYS. I was checking out the web site... 10,000 for a powered w/ sound unit.... YIKES!!!!!!!!!

    i will stay with my G, and HO
    thats way to rich for my blood.

    hehehehe but i would like a box car to sit on :-)....and run my trains

    Jeff
  • In response to Eric Spears question. Check out Live Steam magazine and if you can find one, an issue of Modeltec (no longer published). Both are good for sources . I had a 1/8 scale railroad when I lived on Cape Cod and now have a 15" gauge railroad here in Maine. (www.tallpinesscenicrailroad.com) On both lines I built everything, even wheels. If you are a good scrounger, and I hate that word, you can build rather inexpensively. The cost of track is about the same as you would spend for G gauge, around $2.50 per foot. But be warned if you take that route you will need some tooling. THAT can get expensive. You can get around that though if you have a friend with a machine shop or can sign up for night classes at your local high school or college. I hope this info helps you out. It is great fun moving down the track on something you can ride on or in. By the way, I have built several riding cars in both 1/8 and 1/4 scale using the pull out plans from Garden Railways. Good Luck. Walter Whiting
  • Walter, Really enjoyed your website! What you have created is masterpiece! I'm not sure if other members of this forum will see the self disipline you have put forth on your RR.

    Definately an EXTREME Garden Railroad[:D]
  • WALTER
    SOME GARDEN RAIL ROAD, I DON'T HAVE THAT MUCH LAND ., BUT LIKE WHAT I HAVE ,IT KEEPS ME BUSY ,I HAVE A SMALL POND WITH FISH AND A RAIL ROAD RUNNING AROUND IT, SO FAR ABOUT 165 FT. OF TRACK , AND SEVERAL BRIDGES
    BEN --OF---PENNA .[:)][2c]
  • If it works for YOU that is wonderful.Send some pictures. Walter
    QUOTE: Originally posted by bennysrr

    WALTER
    SOME GARDEN RAIL ROAD, I DON'T HAVE THAT MUCH LAND ., BUT LIKE WHAT I HAVE ,IT KEEPS ME BUSY ,I HAVE A SMALL POND WITH FISH AND A RAIL ROAD RUNNING AROUND IT, SO FAR ABOUT 165 FT. OF TRACK , AND SEVERAL BRIDGES
    BEN --OF---PENNA .[:)][2c]
  • Walter

    How much does one of those rails weight?
    On the photo side of it did the program your using for showing the photos come with a brave net pages or is it a different program?
  • The rail is 12 lb. and the website program is from godaddy.com. I tried to link to bravenet, but I can't get the program to run correctly. Walter
    QUOTE: Originally posted by Bluebonnet - 71

    Walter

    How much does one of those rails weight?
    On the photo side of it did the program your using for showing the photos come with a brave net pages or is it a different program?
  • QUOTE: Originally posted by walter42646

    The rail is 12 lb. and the website program is from godaddy.com. I tried to link to bravenet, but I can't get the program to run correctly. Walter
    QUOTE: Originally posted by Bluebonnet - 71

    Walter

    How much does one of those rails weight?
    On the photo side of it did the program your using for showing the photos come with a brave net pages or is it a different program?



    Program worked fine when I checked out your web site.
  • Saboja and others,
    I am building a train toy box from plans from Meisel Hardware. I am making it from treated plywood and will be used as a seat and to store my controls and such. Also I have seen plans on Ebay for ride-on backyard trains. I've been curious and have book marked it several times only to forget about them.
  • The magazine you want to get is called Live Steam. That's where you'll find the ads for the riding scales. 1" and 1-1/2" are the most common.

    Hang on to your wallet though, because to build something large enough to haul 6 people, you will need to spend at least $5,000 to start. That will get you some track, a gasoline powered diesel engine, and a few cars. It helps to be a machinist, and have a well equiped shop.
  • Eric,

    I second what Big Boy has said--check out Live Steam magazine. There's also another magazine called Grand Scales Quarterly, which focuses on 12" and larger scales. Check out their web site: http://www.grandscales.com/

    To echo what Matt said, Riding Railkits is our only ride-on scale advertiser. I've met the owner, Rod Johnston, and he's a great guy. They sell kits for ride on, as well as an intro video.

    Good luck!

    Rene Schweitzer

    Production editor

    Garden Railways magazine

  • Thanks Rene, actually Walt said it first back up near the top, but I missed it. The only reason I know anything about this stuff is that there is a club near where I live that operates an 11 acre railroad. I joined the club a few years back, but never got very involved, and simply dropped out after a while.

    Part of the reason for dropping out was that I realized that I wasn't going to be able to handle the trains. Not only from a cost perspective, but also maintenance and even riding. I'm a rather large guy at 6' 1", 350 pounds. That is kind of close to the load limit for 1" trains. 1-1/2" can go to about 500 pounds.

    Eric, I would suggest looking in the back of the Live Steam magazine, and see if there is a club near you, and visit there before making any decision. Riding trains are fun, but they aren't easy. The bigger they get, the more they behave like real trains. One nice thing about 1" and 1-1/2" is that once you have a train, you can join a numer of different clubs and travel with your train.

    Walter, I've never seen anyone do 3" on a private layout. Isn't 3" the size used in zoos and amusement parks?
  • Big boy
    Yes it is. They also use 24" gauge equipment. I have built railroads in HO, O, G, ! 1/2" and 3". For me personally my favorite is the 3" followed by G. Reason being, you ride in it and to me there is no greater thrill than operating large equipment that you built with your own hands. While I agree that it can be very very expensive to buy, everything can be built by anyone with the desire. You don't need heavy machinery, but it helps. You can sign up for night courses at your locan high school or college. Materials can be scrounged. I built everything for mine including wheels. In fact I wrote two articles for Grand Scales Quarterly on how I made wheels and boxcar end ribs. By the way, I have a friend that lives 5 miles away that has a 15" gauge railroad.
    Regards
    Walter