The Disneyland Thread fka B.Y.O.B.

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Posted by Firelock76 on Sunday, October 1, 2017 8:19 PM

Great shots and research Becky!  The story I read about the giant squid fight was when they originally shot it with a clear sky and a red background the squid just didn't look real.  Walt came up with the idea of the raging thunderstorm.  With the rain slashing down in buckets and the lightning flashing the squid looked MORE than real, it was downright terrifying!  Best looking movie giant squid ever, much better than the one in the 1960 film "Voyage To The Bottom Of The Sea,"  which was a pretty good film in it's own right.

Here's a story for everyone.  A man I worked with in the 80's was a World War Two navy veteran, served on the carrier USS Lexington.  One day while they were steaming a guy yelled "Holy smoke!  Lookit what's going on off the port side!"

Everyone ran across the flight deck, and lo and behold there was a sperm whale fighting with a giant squid!  Both rolling and flailing on the surface, eventually the whale won, and ate the squid!

Guess what?  Next time they were at anchor and had a swim call nobody went in the water!

As Joe said, "The moral of the story is, you don't know what's down there!"

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Posted by Penny Trains on Sunday, October 1, 2017 9:16 PM

I just couldn't resist researching that!  Laugh

Trains, trains, wonderful trains.  The more you get, the more you toot!  Big Smile

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Posted by Postwar Paul on Sunday, October 1, 2017 9:56 PM

It has been so long since I've seen this film, I only remember the Nautilus, and the cool look of the film. I remember I liked it, but that's about it.

Peter Lorre ? Wow, need to go back and check it out again ! 

Walt's animated films used many familiar voices, he used a lot of the same people over again. Check out the stork in Dumbo. Sounds like Winnie the Pooh, doesn't it ?

Sterling Holloway. 

Love the train scenes in Dumbo ! 

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Posted by Firelock76 on Monday, October 2, 2017 7:08 PM

Penny Trains

I just couldn't resist researching that!  Laugh

 

Yep, nine-out-of-ten sperm whales prefer giant squid as a snack than anything else in the ocean!

Just ask 'em, they'll tell you!

"Thar she blows!"  "BUUUUUURRRRRRP!!!!"

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Posted by Penny Trains on Tuesday, October 3, 2017 6:26 PM

That "thing" in the photo with the whale is obviously made of rubber, but this one aint!  Tongue Tied

The Humboldt Squid: diablo rojo.  The stuff that nightmares are made of!  Tongue Tied

Though most of them certainly don't get big enough to drag down a submarine!

 

Trains, trains, wonderful trains.  The more you get, the more you toot!  Big Smile

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Posted by Penny Trains on Tuesday, October 3, 2017 7:39 PM

Maybe we'll have more fun with ol' squidy as Halloween gets closer.  But for now, here are some pics of the Santa Fe and Disneyland RR engine house.

Not so grand as Walt originally planned:

This sketch was created by Herb Ryman while he and Walt spent a weekend furiously mapping it all out before Walt had to meet with investors on Monday.  This is the sketch that sold a lot of bankers and sponsors on the idea.  Over on the left was Walt's ideas for a roundhouse where the Jungle Cruise would end up.  Whereas the Jungle Cruise is where Space Mountain ended up 25 years later.  That plan was the evolution of this one:

The original idea (well, not THE original idea) was to build the park on the plot of land accross the street from the Burbank studio.

Fortunately the plan outgrew the parcel and they didn't have to tear down the park when the freeway at the bottom of the photo came through!  Wink

The engine facilty was enlarged in 1959 to accomnodate the "second level" of the Disneyland train layout.

The Ward Kimball (or Maud as I knew her) leaves the shop.

I thank the photographer with the zoom lens that got these pics!

Fuel oil delivery?

Switching coasts, some pics of the Walt Disney World Railroad.

Ummmm.....Tongue Tied

Last spike ceremony:

Bought, but not restored:

Walt Disney World's "other" railroad: The Fort Wilderness Line.

Yes, those really are trolley cars behind the tender!

Fort Wilderness RR station:

I'd rather have the train!

Trains, trains, wonderful trains.  The more you get, the more you toot!  Big Smile

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Posted by Firelock76 on Tuesday, October 3, 2017 8:22 PM

Those Segways give me the willies, they remind me of the old-fashioned push lawn mowers.

Ever have to use a push mower?  Ugh!  Thank God for Briggs and Stratton!

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Posted by Penny Trains on Tuesday, October 3, 2017 8:58 PM

Oh yes!  Stick out tongue  We had electric mowers too.  What we should have had was stock in extension cord manufacturers!  Tongue Tied

Trains, trains, wonderful trains.  The more you get, the more you toot!  Big Smile

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Posted by Postwar Paul on Tuesday, October 3, 2017 11:15 PM

Those are some fantastic pictures of the S.F&D.R.R. ! I am glad they did not build Disneyland in Burbank, don't know where they would have put it. That whole area is chock full of fun stuff ! Across the freeway from Disney studios is Traveltown, with many great old steamers on display. Next to that is the Los Angeles Live Steamers ( they have a Disney loop , by the way. ). Down from there is the L.A. zoo. I understand there was a time a narrow gauge train ran from Traveltown to the Zoo. From what I understand( and this was before my time), it was the train from the Oahu Railway, number 85, an outside frame 4-6-0, and the coach and combine, which are still displayed at Traveltown. The 85 has gone back to Hawaii, the last I heard it went to the Lahaina, Kaanapali, and Pacific, in Maui, to be rebuilt. I have pictures of 85, and the Hawaiian tank engine at Traveltown, before they went back to Hawaii. Unfortunately, the termites have gotten to the coaches, and most of the wooden cars on display.

Burbank also has the Equestrian center, and many places where you can rent a horse for an hour or two. My daughter and I used to rent a horse from one of the stables, and ride up into the hills of Griffith Park on the trails above Traveltown.  One time my horse "Slick", an old ,broken down and worn out looking horse, got it in his mind to run!  I pulled back on the reins, but it did no good. Fortunately, we had a horse handler with us who rode up and tamed the beast ! 

I did not know WDW had another railroad. My visit to WDW was very short, we didn't see much. We had gone cross country on Amtrak, staying in Youth Hostels, headed to NYC to catch a plane to London, and to explore Europe. This was the worry free days of '76 and '77.  But got all over Europe on a Eurail Pass ! And Britain on a Britrail Pass.

It may have changed a little !

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Posted by Firelock76 on Wednesday, October 4, 2017 4:29 PM

Penny Trains

Oh yes!  Stick out tongue  We had electric mowers too.  What we should have had was stock in extension cord manufacturers!  Tongue Tied

 

I've been using an electric mower over 15 years now, and never ran over the extension cord.

I cut it in half with the electric edge trimmers.  Popped a circuit breaker in the house, too.

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Posted by Penny Trains on Wednesday, October 4, 2017 6:28 PM

Firelock76
I've been using an electric mower over 15 years now, and never ran over the extension cord. I cut it in half with the electric edge trimmers. Popped a circuit breaker in the house, too.

Doh!  Oops - Sign

Trains, trains, wonderful trains.  The more you get, the more you toot!  Big Smile

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Posted by Penny Trains on Wednesday, October 4, 2017 7:15 PM

Yes!  The LA Live Steamers have Walt Disney's barn:

Some of Ward's toys at the barn:

Walt's locos are on display inside:

Including the King George VI:

If I ever get to the left coast it's very high on my list of sights to see!  Big Smile

Travel Town and Rail Giants too!

L.K.&P. #5:

No. 5: a 3 ft (914 mm) narrow gauge outside frame 0-6-2 saddle tank locomotive. This engine is not in operating condition, but it is the only steam engine owned by the LKPRR with historical ties to Hawaii. It once ran on the Oahu Railway and Land Company until it was donated in 1954 to the Travel Town Museum in Los Angeles.[7] Through an equipment trade with Travel Town, the LKPRR brought No. 5 back to Hawaii, where it remains today awaiting restoration.

I found the above on Wikipedia: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lahaina,_Kaanapali_and_Pacific_Railroad

FWRR from Extinct Disney:

"Though the official reasons for its closure were never released, many problems ultimately lead to the demise of the Fort Wilderness Railroad. Issues ranging from fuel capacity (leading to stranded trains of guests) to track conditions are the most widely accepted however in 1979 it is rumored that a young girl riding a bicycle was struck by a passing train which supposedly sealed the fate of the railroad. Operating only occasionally beginning in late 1977, the railroad was finally shut down and abandoned to nature in the early 1980's."

 

Fort Wilderness Railroad

Opening in 1973, the Fort Wilderness Railroad was a 4/5 scale fully operational steam train that ran through the extensive property of the Fort Wilderness Campground. Unlike the engines found at the Magic Kingdom, the engines of the Fort Wilderness Railroad were not given names and were differentiated only by numbers painted on the sides.

 

Though the official reasons for its closure were never released, many problems ultimately lead to the demise of the Fort Wilderness Railroad. Issues ranging from fuel capacity (leading to stranded trains of guests) to track conditions are the most widely accepted however in 1979 it is rumored that a young girl riding a bicycle was struck by a passing train which supposedly sealed the fate of the railroad. Operating only occasionally beginning in late 1977, the railroad was finally shut down and abandoned to nature in the early 1980's.

 

After its closure, some of the train cars were reused around Disney property. Two were placed on Pleasure Island property and re-purposed for use as ticket booths (eventually repainted to fit the theme of the area). Another was reported as part of the theming found outside Typhoon Lagoon. The Carolwood Pacific Historical Society has reclaimed at least one car and engine in an attempt to preserve the railroad's history.

Fort Wilderness Railroad

Opening in 1973, the Fort Wilderness Railroad was a 4/5 scale fully operational steam train that ran through the extensive property of the Fort Wilderness Campground. Unlike the engines found at the Magic Kingdom, the engines of the Fort Wilderness Railroad were not given names and were differentiated only by numbers painted on the sides.

 

Though the official reasons for its closure were never released, many problems ultimately lead to the demise of the Fort Wilderness Railroad. Issues ranging from fuel capacity (leading to stranded trains of guests) to track conditions are the most widely accepted however in 1979 it is rumored that a young girl riding a bicycle was struck by a passing train which supposedly sealed the fate of the railroad. Operating only occasionally beginning in late 1977, the railroad was finally shut down and abandoned to nature in the early 1980's.

 

After its closure, some of the train cars were reused around Disney property. Two were placed on Pleasure Island property and re-purposed for use as ticket booths (eventually repainted to fit the theme of the area). Another was reported as part of the theming found outside Typhoon Lagoon. The Carolwood Pacific Historical Society has reclaimed at least one car and engine in an attempt to preserve the railroad's history.

Trains, trains, wonderful trains.  The more you get, the more you toot!  Big Smile

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Posted by Penny Trains on Wednesday, October 4, 2017 8:10 PM

Speaking of things you CAN'T do at WDW anymore, it was once possible to have the best seat in the house on the Highway in the Sky.

They even issued these to kids:

Sadly, that all came to an end in 2009: http://www.cnn.com/2009/US/07/05/u.s.disney.monorail/

Let's look at the WDW system in a happier light.

Inside the barn:

The operator's control panel.  The seats in the background are where you were once allowed to ride.

As it is at Disneyland, the Monorail barn is adjacent to the WDWRR engine house.

Construction of the Glideway:

This is the "Tug" or "tow vehicle" that gets deployed if your train breaks down:

And yes, old Monorails do get put out to pasture:

This is the Tokyo Monorail:

Inside the barn at Disneyland:

This is a Mark I Monorail built by Disney engineers based on designs by Alweg in 1959.  WDW opened with the Mark IV in 1971 with prerecorded narration by Jack Wagner, including the lines "Please stand clear of the doors. Por favor manténganse alejado de las puertas.", which you can get on a T-Shirt!  WDW trains have been built by Martin-Marietta and Bombardier Transportation.

Disneyland had the Mark V which are identifiable by the ridge along the roof.

They also had a....well......odd life....Tongue Tied

 +

That's not to say their replacements don't have odd characteristics from time to time:

Disneyland now has the Mark VII's built by Dynamic Structures.

They do a decent job of looking retro:

Mark I

Mark VII

The toy monorail has glideway of a different shape than the real trains.

Of course the dream of Disney toy collectors is to get their hands on one of these:

Schuco made both 3 and 4 car versions:

 

Trains, trains, wonderful trains.  The more you get, the more you toot!  Big Smile

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Posted by Firelock76 on Wednesday, October 4, 2017 8:30 PM

Oh wow, that Union Pacific 9000, the class leader of those three-cylinder 4-12-2's I mentioned in an earlier post.

That's one the real UP fans would love to see brought back to life, but it's not likely.  Cool as it is it doesn't have the cachet' that a Big Boy does. 

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Posted by Postwar Paul on Wednesday, October 4, 2017 10:55 PM

Firelock76

Oh wow, that Union Pacific 9000, the class leader of those three-cylinder 4-12-2's I mentioned in an earlier post.

That's one the real UP fans would love to see brought back to life, but it's not likely.  Cool as it is it doesn't have the cachet' that a Big Boy does. 

 

That 9000 is a humongous engine. They have it parked now at the L.A. Fairgrounds in Pomona, along with an Espee 3 cylinder 4-10-2, and a Santa Fe Hudson. They just pulled U.P. 4014 out to go back to Cheyenne.  

Oh, and they have train shows at this facility.

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Posted by Postwar Paul on Wednesday, October 4, 2017 10:57 PM

Penny Trains

Yes!  The LA Live Steamers have Walt Disney's barn:

Some of Ward's toys at the barn:

Walt's locos are on display inside:

Including the King George VI:

If I ever get to the left coast it's very high on my list of sights to see!  Big Smile

Travel Town and Rail Giants too!

L.K.&P. #5:

No. 5: a 3 ft (914 mm) narrow gauge outside frame 0-6-2 saddle tank locomotive. This engine is not in operating condition, but it is the only steam engine owned by the LKPRR with historical ties to Hawaii. It once ran on the Oahu Railway and Land Company until it was donated in 1954 to the Travel Town Museum in Los Angeles.[7] Through an equipment trade with Travel Town, the LKPRR brought No. 5 back to Hawaii, where it remains today awaiting restoration.

I found the above on Wikipedia: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lahaina,_Kaanapali_and_Pacific_Railroad

FWRR from Extinct Disney:

"Though the official reasons for its closure were never released, many problems ultimately lead to the demise of the Fort Wilderness Railroad. Issues ranging from fuel capacity (leading to stranded trains of guests) to track conditions are the most widely accepted however in 1979 it is rumored that a young girl riding a bicycle was struck by a passing train which supposedly sealed the fate of the railroad. Operating only occasionally beginning in late 1977, the railroad was finally shut down and abandoned to nature in the early 1980's."

 

Fort Wilderness Railroad

Opening in 1973, the Fort Wilderness Railroad was a 4/5 scale fully operational steam train that ran through the extensive property of the Fort Wilderness Campground. Unlike the engines found at the Magic Kingdom, the engines of the Fort Wilderness Railroad were not given names and were differentiated only by numbers painted on the sides.

 

Though the official reasons for its closure were never released, many problems ultimately lead to the demise of the Fort Wilderness Railroad. Issues ranging from fuel capacity (leading to stranded trains of guests) to track conditions are the most widely accepted however in 1979 it is rumored that a young girl riding a bicycle was struck by a passing train which supposedly sealed the fate of the railroad. Operating only occasionally beginning in late 1977, the railroad was finally shut down and abandoned to nature in the early 1980's.

 

After its closure, some of the train cars were reused around Disney property. Two were placed on Pleasure Island property and re-purposed for use as ticket booths (eventually repainted to fit the theme of the area). Another was reported as part of the theming found outside Typhoon Lagoon. The Carolwood Pacific Historical Society has reclaimed at least one car and engine in an attempt to preserve the railroad's history.

Fort Wilderness Railroad

Opening in 1973, the Fort Wilderness Railroad was a 4/5 scale fully operational steam train that ran through the extensive property of the Fort Wilderness Campground. Unlike the engines found at the Magic Kingdom, the engines of the Fort Wilderness Railroad were not given names and were differentiated only by numbers painted on the sides.

 

Though the official reasons for its closure were never released, many problems ultimately lead to the demise of the Fort Wilderness Railroad. Issues ranging from fuel capacity (leading to stranded trains of guests) to track conditions are the most widely accepted however in 1979 it is rumored that a young girl riding a bicycle was struck by a passing train which supposedly sealed the fate of the railroad. Operating only occasionally beginning in late 1977, the railroad was finally shut down and abandoned to nature in the early 1980's.

 

After its closure, some of the train cars were reused around Disney property. Two were placed on Pleasure Island property and re-purposed for use as ticket booths (eventually repainted to fit the theme of the area). Another was reported as part of the theming found outside Typhoon Lagoon. The Carolwood Pacific Historical Society has reclaimed at least one car and engine in an attempt to preserve the railroad's history.

 

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Posted by Postwar Paul on Wednesday, October 4, 2017 11:01 PM
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Posted by Postwar Paul on Wednesday, October 4, 2017 11:04 PM

 This is 85

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Posted by Postwar Paul on Wednesday, October 4, 2017 11:10 PM

There are great shots of this engine running on the Oahu Railway and Land, in Gale Treiber's book "Hawaiian Railway Album, WWII Photographs "

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Posted by Postwar Paul on Wednesday, October 4, 2017 11:15 PM

 Traveltown days...

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Posted by Postwar Paul on Wednesday, October 4, 2017 11:20 PM

This is from our trip to Maui in '92.

 the L.K.& P.

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Posted by Postwar Paul on Wednesday, October 4, 2017 11:26 PM

 They had 2 Porter engines, 2-4-0 wheel arrangement. Look similar to Cedar Park, somewhat ?

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Posted by Postwar Paul on Wednesday, October 4, 2017 11:39 PM

Wow, those Monorails ! To the casual observer ( me) I knew they had been updated over the years, but I could not tell you which was which. Thank You for taking the time to explain !

I also would occasionally ride the " other " monorail. The one up in Seattle that runs to the Space Needle.

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Posted by Penny Trains on Thursday, October 5, 2017 6:16 PM

Postwar Paul

This is from our trip to Maui in '92.

 the L.K.& P.

 

What a fascinating tender!

Trains, trains, wonderful trains.  The more you get, the more you toot!  Big Smile

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Posted by Penny Trains on Thursday, October 5, 2017 7:02 PM

The problem with the monorails is that most of the modifications over the years didn't change the outside appearance.

Mark 1 1959-1961:

Mark II 1961-1969:

Nearly identical except these are 4 car trains.  As built, the Monorail was an 8/10 mile ride around Tomorrowland.  But when they extended the route to stop at the Disneyland Hotel, they needed greater capacity trains since now hotel guests could ride into the park and bypass the ticket kisosks entirely.

Mark III 1969-1987:

Can you guess what's different?  Wink  That's right, another increase in ridership meant adding another car!

Mark IV 1971-1989:

The WDW Monorails originally had bench seats and guests were encouraged to "slide over" till they were practically popping out the windows!

Mark V 1986-2008:

The white cars come to Anaheim.  The Mark V's have that "ridge" on top, but I have no idea why.

It should also be noted that while Disneyland guests have always been able to open the windows, WDW guests cannot.

Mark VI 1989-today:

Achieving greater capacity by eliminating comfort.  Stick out tongue

Mark VII 2008-today

Some of the bench seats now face perpendicular to the motion of the car.

Why?

Remember when people used to leave these things at home and rent the much smaller, simpler and more "friendly to other guests" ones available at the parks?  SoapBox

If I had a time machine I'd spend a week or two at the Century 21 Exposition.

They really did it right.  The fair paid for a lot of cultural and municipal buildings and turned Seattle from a "frontier town" (as it was described in a documentary I saw) into a full fledged city on the map.

Trains, trains, wonderful trains.  The more you get, the more you toot!  Big Smile

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Posted by Postwar Paul on Thursday, October 5, 2017 8:58 PM

Penny Trains

 This would be a "whaleback" tender, as popularized by the N-C-O. ( the Nevada-California-Oregon). An oil fired locomotive, obviously. The one take away I have from the L.K.& P. In Maui is need to conserve resources on the island, and reduce waste. 

L.K.& P. Engines are oil fired, with waste oil from automotive oil changes.

 
Postwar Paul

This is from our trip to Maui in '92.

 the L.K.& P.

 

 

 

What a fascinating tender!

 

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Posted by Postwar Paul on Thursday, October 5, 2017 10:23 PM

I am sitting here in Monorail Heaven! Thank You ! I think I am a Mark 111 kind of guy, because that's what I remember. But the Mark 7 is great, really need to check it out.

On Seattle's monorail: been there many times. They had the 1962 World's fair in Seattle, and built the Space Needle, the complex below, and the Monorail. If you go up in the Space Needle, it rotates very slowly, so you can enjoy views of downtown, and Puget Sound. The funny thing about the Monorail, is that you go from the excitement of the Space Needle and environs, to a somewhat non descript part of downtown. You get off the Monorail, take one look around, and wonder " when's the next train ?".

But, Seattle is a great city. I spent many vacations there, and at one point seriously considered making the move.

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Posted by Postwar Paul on Friday, October 6, 2017 11:31 PM

 Here's an N-C-O engine with a whaleback. This railroad didn't last too long, many engines passed to the S.P. Narrow gauge.

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Posted by Postwar Paul on Friday, October 6, 2017 11:41 PM

Which most people asso crate with this tender style.

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Posted by Firelock76 on Saturday, October 7, 2017 11:19 AM

Postwar Paul
 
Penny Trains

 This would be a "whaleback" tender, as popularized by the N-C-O. ( the Nevada-California-Oregon). An oil fired locomotive, obviously. The one take away I have from the L.K.& P. In Maui is need to conserve resources on the island, and reduce waste. 

L.K.& P. Engines are oil fired, with waste oil from automotive oil changes.

 
Postwar Paul

This is from our trip to Maui in '92.

 the L.K.& P.

 

 

 

What a fascinating tender!

 

 

 

 

Very smart, and they're not the first ones to do this.  The now-defunct Morris County Central steam tourist railroad in New Jersey did the same thing starting in the mid-Sixties.  The road's organizer, Earl Gil, had a tanker truck he drove around to gas stations and auto repair shops collecting waste oil which those establishments were only too happy to get rid of easily.  Earl got all the fuel he needed for the locomotives, and free as well!

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