You're gorgeous! Your favorite Lionels

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Posted by phrankenstign on Sunday, April 16, 2017 6:40 PM

rtraincollector

1061 was made as a 0-4-0 and also as a 2-4-2. I have owned both. When I got the 0-4-0 I thought someone took them off but was informed no they where made both ways

 

You're absolutely correct!  I dislike the 0-4-0 cheapened version only.

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Posted by Firelock76 on Sunday, April 16, 2017 6:45 PM

Dwight Frye, an unsung hero of World War Two.  Think I'm joking?

In addition to being a fine actor Dwight Frye was an industrial tooling designer and draftsman. When the US entered World War Two he got a job at Lockheed Aircraft designing industrial tooling by night as he continued to act during the day.  The poor man literally worked himself to death coming up with ways to expedite wartime production.  A real patriot, and as much as casualty as if he was hit by a German or Japanese bullet.

And that's a pretty good list, Herr Doktor Phrankenstign!

Or is it pronounced "Fronken-Steen?"

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Posted by Postwar Paul on Sunday, April 16, 2017 9:13 PM

Thank you, Firelock for the background info on Dwight Frye. Many things I had not realized. I only knew he died during the war, around '43.

Paul

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Posted by Penny Trains on Monday, April 17, 2017 8:22 PM

Firelock76
Or is it pronounced "Fronken-Steen?"

I tried to insert an "intellectual discussion" joke but nothing really elevated itself to the forefront.

A waking Lithium Flower just about to bloom

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Posted by Firelock76 on Wednesday, April 19, 2017 5:21 PM

Penny Trains
 
Firelock76
Or is it pronounced "Fronken-Steen?"

 

I tried to insert an "intellectual discussion" joke but nothing really elevated itself to the forefront.

 

Well at least somebody got that lame joke of mine!

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Posted by Postwar Paul on Wednesday, April 19, 2017 10:06 PM

Firelock76

 

 
Penny Trains
 
Firelock76
Or is it pronounced "Fronken-Steen?"

 

I tried to insert an "intellectual discussion" joke but nothing really elevated itself to the forefront.

 

 

 

Well at least somebody got that lame joke of mine!

 

I got it. Hiliarius movie, one of my favorites.The great Gene Wilder. They did a great job of lampooning the old Universal classics, not only the look, and the sets, but recreating some of the scenes, like the blind man ( Gene Hackman). If your a fan of the originals, it's priceless. 

Paul

 

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Posted by lionelsoni on Thursday, April 20, 2017 9:12 AM

According to IMDB, the laboratory set is actually the same as in the original movie:  "...Ken Strickfaden, who had made the elaborate electrical machinery for the lab sequences,...had saved all the equipment and stored it in his garage...."

 

Bob Nelson

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Posted by Firelock76 on Thursday, April 20, 2017 2:10 PM

lionelsoni

According to IMDB, the laboratory set is actually the same as in the original movie:  "...Ken Strickfaden, who had made the elaborate electrical machinery for the lab sequences,...had saved all the equipment and stored it in his garage...."

 

 

Quite true!  The Tesla coils, the "Jacobs Ladders", all that cool arcin' 'n sparkin' stuff is from the original "Frankenstein" films.  Mel Brooks and Gene Wilder went to see Ken Strickfaden to see if he could re-create the equipment and guess what?  He still had it!

Here's another bit of "Young Frankenstein" trivia.  Mel Brooks wanted to shoot the film in black and white to keep it in the spirit of the original films and assumed shooting black and white would be cheaper anyway.  Surprise!  It was more expensive!  Movie making was all color by the early 70's and no one was using black and white film stock anymore, it had to be specially made for "YF"!

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Posted by phrankenstign on Thursday, April 20, 2017 3:57 PM

btw "Young Frankenstein" was released on Blu-ray with great picture and sound in various formats back in 2014 for its fortieth anniversary.  Last year I was surprised to see a copy of "Young Frankenstein: The Story of the Making of the Film" by Mel Brooks. Sure it's 42 years late, but it stands as a nice scrapbook companion to that amazing film homage to the first three Frankenstein films starring Boris Karloff as the Monster: Frankenstein (1931), "Bride of Frankenstein (1935), and Son of Frankenstein (1939).

Double-btw Phrankenstign is pronounced Frank-en-stine. The 1931 film is my all-time favorite monster movie.

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Posted by Firelock76 on Thursday, April 20, 2017 5:32 PM

And just to inject a little "railroad" here...

"Pardon me boy, is this the Transylvania Station?"

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Posted by phrankenstign on Thursday, April 20, 2017 6:52 PM

Ya! Ya! Track 29!

KRM
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Posted by KRM on Thursday, April 20, 2017 7:14 PM

Tongue Tied

Joined 1-21-2011    TCA 13-68614

Kev, From The North Bluff Above Marseilles IL. Whistling

 

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Posted by Postwar Paul on Thursday, April 20, 2017 7:21 PM

I went on a kick Last year, and rediscovered how much I enjoy the Universal classic horror movies. I bought the DVD set with all 7 Frankenstein films. When I was growing up in the early sixties, it was Marx trains ( first an o-27 set, then an HO road and rail set). My grandmother worked at Penny's, and would give me these Marx sets. But also, I loved the classic monsters. My brother and I had all the Aurora monster models. Building these kits was my introduction to model building. They are quite collectible now. Unfortunately, when my older brother and I grew up, and moved out, the monster models served as bowling pins for the amusement of my younger brothers, and their friends. I wish I still had them. And I wish I still had those first 2 Marx sets.

Paul

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Posted by Firelock76 on Thursday, April 20, 2017 8:18 PM

Hey Paul, I remember those Aurora monster models, I did the Dracula one myself.  Believe it or not they're back in production, I forget the name of the maker but they're the same old monsters, Dracula, Frankenstein, The Wolfman, The Bride of Frankenstein, even the obscure "Forgotten Prisoner Of The Castel Mare'."  Remember him?  Probably inspired by "The Count of Monte Cristo," except the forgotten prisoner died in chains, his skeleton still hanging from the cell wall. That one was kinda gruesome, gave me the creeps.

Check with some of the hobby or sci-fi shops if there's any in your area for a trip down memory lane.

Those old Universal monster movies were the best.  Scared the hell out of us kids without all the blood n' guts of todays horror films.  Todays horror films are just gross-outs.

Just did a little research.  The outfit making the monster models is called "Polar Lights." 

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Posted by thesiding on Thursday, April 20, 2017 8:29 PM
I believe it is wither Moebious or Polar Lights that makes them now
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Posted by Postwar Paul on Thursday, April 20, 2017 10:59 PM

Firelock76

Hey Paul, I remember those Aurora monster models, I did the Dracula one myself.  Believe it or not they're back in production, I forget the name of the maker but they're the same old monsters, Dracula, Frankenstein, The Wolfman, The Bride of Frankenstein, even the obscure "Forgotten Prisoner Of The Castel Mare'."  Remember him?  Probably inspired by "The Count of Monte Cristo," except the forgotten prisoner died in chains, his skeleton still hanging from the cell wall. That one was kinda gruesome, gave me the creeps.

Check with some of the hobby or sci-fi shops if there's any in your area for a trip down memory lane.

Those old Universal monster movies were the best.  Scared the hell out of us kids without all the blood n' guts of todays horror films.  Todays horror films are just gross-outs.

Just did a little research.  The outfit making the monster models is called "Polar Lights." 

 

once again, you are a source of great info. Those models were so popular at that time. Many kids on my block had them built, and displayed. My brother and I each had Dracula. My dad assembled them ( because of that nasty glue ), and we got to paint them. My very first was The Creature from the Black Lagoon. My cousins were afraid to go in my room ! We had all the main monsters, and the guillotine.I even had the jumbo Frankenstein that was about 2feet tall.And we had the whimsical "Dracula's Dragster", and "Frankenstein 's Flivver". You are right, those monsters were scary without the gore. I'm glad they are still being made. The tooling survives, like so many stories about toy trains in CTT.

 My Marx trains? The 0-27 set was a basic 0-4-0 steamer, plastic boiler. I always remember those cars: they were all plastic, molded in one color, and had a flat silhouette of a truck with a single axle and pair of wheels actually supporting the weight. This would be about 1961. Even then, I disassembled that engine, and I remember my uncle having to put it back in one piece.

The HO set was really cool. It had a U.P. F unit, molded in yellow plastic with a black U.P. Logo. It had oval of track, and a grade crossing with an H.O. Slotcar set. I would run the train (of course), and my brother would always make sure we had a grade crossing accident! The track was a little funky, though. It was tubular steel H.O. Track on fiber ties, and it was a very rough ride ! Talk about washboard track profile. We tried to upgrade to Atlas track, but could not because of the grade crossing section. Nothing else mated with this track. Only the caboose, and a covered hopper survive.This was about 1962.

Then , the Beatles came.

Paul

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Posted by phrankenstign on Friday, April 21, 2017 3:07 PM

Postwar Paul
 
Firelock76

Hey Paul, I remember those Aurora monster models, I did the Dracula one myself.  Believe it or not they're back in production, I forget the name of the maker but they're the same old monsters, Dracula, Frankenstein, The Wolfman, The Bride of Frankenstein, even the obscure "Forgotten Prisoner Of The Castel Mare'."  Remember him?  Probably inspired by "The Count of Monte Cristo," except the forgotten prisoner died in chains, his skeleton still hanging from the cell wall. That one was kinda gruesome, gave me the creeps.

Check with some of the hobby or sci-fi shops if there's any in your area for a trip down memory lane.

Those old Universal monster movies were the best.  Scared the hell out of us kids without all the blood n' guts of todays horror films.  Todays horror films are just gross-outs.

Just did a little research.  The outfit making the monster models is called "Polar Lights." 

 

 

 

once again, you are a source of great info. Those models were so popular at that time. Many kids on my block had them built, and displayed. My brother and I each had Dracula. My dad assembled them ( because of that nasty glue ), and we got to paint them. My very first was The Creature from the Black Lagoon. My cousins were afraid to go in my room ! We had all the main monsters, and the guillotine.I even had the jumbo Frankenstein that was about 2feet tall.And we had the whimsical "Dracula's Dragster", and "Frankenstein 's Flivver". You are right, those monsters were scary without the gore. I'm glad they are still being made. The tooling survives, like so many stories about toy trains in CTT.

 

The HO set was really cool. It had a U.P. F unit, molded in yellow plastic with a black U.P. Logo. It had oval of track, and a grade crossing with an H.O. Slotcar set. I would run the train (of course), and my brother would always make sure we had a grade crossing accident! The track was a little funky, though. It was tubular steel H.O. Track on fiber ties, and it was a very rough ride ! Talk about washboard track profile. We tried to upgrade to Atlas track, but could not because of the grade crossing section. Nothing else mated with this track. Only the caboose, and a covered hopper survive.This was about 1962.

Then , the Beatles came.

Paul

 

Your set appears to be like the one I had also!

Here's a pic of what it looked like:

Train 'N Turnpike

Those cars took a beating, but they continued to run well even though they'd sometimes crash into the train or get hit by the Union Pacific engine time after time again!

As for the monster models, there were originally 13 of them produced by Aurora.

  • Frankenstein (Boris Karloff/Universal Pictures)

  • The Bride of Frankenstein (Elsa Lanchester/Universal Pictures)

  • Dracula (Bela Lugosi/Universal Pictures)

  • The Wolf Man (Lon Chaney Jr./Universal Pictures)

  • The Mummy (Lon Chaney Jr./Universal Pictures)

  • The Creature from the Black Lagoon (Universal International Pictures)

  • The Phantom of the Opera (James Cagney/Universal International Pictures)

  • Dr. Jekyll as Mr. Hyde (Fredric March/Paramount Pictures)

  • King Kong (R.K.O. General)

  • The Hunchback of Notre Dame (Anthony Quinn/Allied Artists Pictures)

  • Godzilla (Embassy Pictures/TransWorld Releasing Corporation)

  • The Witch (An Aurora original design)
  • Forgotten Prisoner of Castel-Mare (An Aurora original designed by Famous Monsters of Filmland

Aurora also came out with the Monster Rods:

  • Frankenstein's Flivver

  • Dracula's Dragster

  • Wolf Man's Wagon

  • Mummy's Chariot

  • King Kong's Thronester

  • Godzilla's Go Cart

Aurora went out of business in the 70s when it ended up being bought out by one of its former competitors, Monogram. Since then, Monogram has reissued many of the Aurora-designed models including some of the monster kit line. Evidently some of the molds haven't survived the years.

Polar Lights, a division of Playing Mantis Inc., reissued all but two (Phantom of the Opera and Dr. Jekyll as Mr. Hyde) of the monster kits---including the monster rods---in Aurora-style long box reproductions beginning in 1999. They contracted Monogram to use their molds to produce the kits. In cases where the original molds weren't available, Polar Lights created NEW molds using vintage Aurora-produced kits as patterns. They also created new horror kits (Psycho House, Sleepy Hollow Headless Horseman, and huge, 16” tall Godzilla), but ceased production in 2004 when Racing Champions (RC2) bought out Playing Mantis for its die-cast division, Johnny Lightning.

Former Playing Mantis Inc. owner Thomas Lowe later bought back Polar Lights as part of his new company named Round 2. His company continues to reissue Aurora kits, but now in the square, “Glow In The Dark”-type boxes Aurora used in the 70s.

Later, a former distributor of Polar Lights products created a new company named Moebius that released Dr. Jekyll as Mr. Hyde and Gigantic Frankenstein (A.K.A. Big Frankie) in Aurora-style reproduction boxes also. Moebius has also created new monster kits of The Mummy, Frankenstein (alone and with his bride), Dracula, The Munster's House, and many sci-fi TV series based kits.

Monarch has also entered the market creating NEW kits packaged in the Aurora-style long boxes. Nosferatu, The Ghost of the Forgotten Prisoner, and Gorgo are a few of their offerings.

Some of the original Aurora models have been changed over the years:

  • Frankenstein came in a deeper box (It conformed to the same size as the other monster boxes)

  • Dracula's face was resculpted to avoid having to pay a royalty to the Bela Lugosi estate.

  • Hunchback's face was made to look more like Cagney's version of Quasimodo.

  • Some of the vegetation on King Kong's base was eliminated.

  • Some of the pieces were eliminated from the Bride of Frankenstein's kit.

  • Strap was added to Godzilla's Go Cart parachute

  • Godzilla's Go Cart was renamed The Go Cart

It's still possible to complete a collection of the original 13 Aurora kits without paying too much. The most difficult (and therefore most expensive) kit to find is the Phantom of the Opera. Luckily, Monogram issued it as part of their Luminators line of glow in the dark kits in 1992. Two years later they reissued the Phantom as just a regular kit. Both can be had for less than $30 each. CineModels reissued it in 1994 in the Aurora-style long box. That is the most expensive of the lot and usually commands at least $50.00. Each of the other 12 kits can probably be attained for less than $20 each.

The reason I happen to know quite a bit about this subject is that I collected as much of Polar Lights' output as I could. I kept track of all variations I found, and I compiled it on-line for sharing with others at www.phrankenstign.com. It is a free, not-for-profit reference site I put together over the years. It's nearly complete. Hopefully I'll be able to finish it this year.

 

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Posted by Penny Trains on Friday, April 21, 2017 7:38 PM

This is the Polar Lights kit I've always wanted to build.  But I doubt I could do it anywhere near as well as this builder did!

A waking Lithium Flower just about to bloom

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Posted by phrankenstign on Friday, April 21, 2017 8:36 PM

Wow!  That's amazing!!!

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Posted by Postwar Paul on Friday, April 21, 2017 9:57 PM

phrankenstign

 Thank You ! I am speechless ! You had the exact Marx train I once had!  What a really cool set to play with. You've mentioned all the monsters, between my brother and I, we had most of them. No Godzilla, or Bride of Frankenstein, but we had:

the Creature

the Wolfman

2Dracula s

Frankenstein ( standard, and the steroid version )

Mummy

Hyde

Hunchback

And the Phantom 

what I have currently is just Frankenstein ( about 1983 production)

and the Phantom ( about 1967 production, Frightening Lighting)

wow, sometimes it seems like the world moves in very small circles !

Paul

 
Postwar Paul
 
Firelock76

Hey Paul, I remember those Aurora monster models, I did the Dracula one myself.  Believe it or not they're back in production, I forget the name of the maker but they're the same old monsters, Dracula, Frankenstein, The Wolfman, The Bride of Frankenstein, even the obscure "Forgotten Prisoner Of The Castel Mare'."  Remember him?  Probably inspired by "The Count of Monte Cristo," except the forgotten prisoner died in chains, his skeleton still hanging from the cell wall. That one was kinda gruesome, gave me the creeps.

Check with some of the hobby or sci-fi shops if there's any in your area for a trip down memory lane.

Those old Universal monster movies were the best.  Scared the hell out of us kids without all the blood n' guts of todays horror films.  Todays horror films are just gross-outs.

Just did a little research.  The outfit making the monster models is called "Polar Lights." 

 

 

 

once again, you are a source of great info. Those models were so popular at that time. Many kids on my block had them built, and displayed. My brother and I each had Dracula. My dad assembled them ( because of that nasty glue ), and we got to paint them. My very first was The Creature from the Black Lagoon. My cousins were afraid to go in my room ! We had all the main monsters, and the guillotine.I even had the jumbo Frankenstein that was about 2feet tall.And we had the whimsical "Dracula's Dragster", and "Frankenstein 's Flivver". You are right, those monsters were scary without the gore. I'm glad they are still being made. The tooling survives, like so many stories about toy trains in CTT.

 

The HO set was really cool. It had a U.P. F unit, molded in yellow plastic with a black U.P. Logo. It had oval of track, and a grade crossing with an H.O. Slotcar set. I would run the train (of course), and my brother would always make sure we had a grade crossing accident! The track was a little funky, though. It was tubular steel H.O. Track on fiber ties, and it was a very rough ride ! Talk about washboard track profile. We tried to upgrade to Atlas track, but could not because of the grade crossing section. Nothing else mated with this track. Only the caboose, and a covered hopper survive.This was about 1962.

Then , the Beatles came.

Paul

 

 

Your set appears to be like the one I had also!

Here's a pic of what it looked like:

Train 'N Turnpike

Those cars took a beating, but they continued to run well even though they'd sometimes crash into the train or get hit by the Union Pacific engine time after time again!

As for the monster models, there were originally 13 of them produced by Aurora.

  • Frankenstein (Boris Karloff/Universal Pictures)

  • The Bride of Frankenstein (Elsa Lanchester/Universal Pictures)

  • Dracula (Bela Lugosi/Universal Pictures)

  • The Wolf Man (Lon Chaney Jr./Universal Pictures)

  • The Mummy (Lon Chaney Jr./Universal Pictures)

  • The Creature from the Black Lagoon (Universal International Pictures)

  • The Phantom of the Opera (James Cagney/Universal International Pictures)

  • Dr. Jekyll as Mr. Hyde (Fredric March/Paramount Pictures)

  • King Kong (R.K.O. General)

  • The Hunchback of Notre Dame (Anthony Quinn/Allied Artists Pictures)

  • Godzilla (Embassy Pictures/TransWorld Releasing Corporation)

  • The Witch (An Aurora original design)
  • Forgotten Prisoner of Castel-Mare (An Aurora original designed by Famous Monsters of Filmland

Aurora also came out with the Monster Rods:

  • Frankenstein's Flivver

  • Dracula's Dragster

  • Wolf Man's Wagon

  • Mummy's Chariot

  • King Kong's Thronester

  • Godzilla's Go Cart

Aurora went out of business in the 70s when it ended up being bought out by one of its former competitors, Monogram. Since then, Monogram has reissued many of the Aurora-designed models including some of the monster kit line. Evidently some of the molds haven't survived the years.

Polar Lights, a division of Playing Mantis Inc., reissued all but two (Phantom of the Opera and Dr. Jekyll as Mr. Hyde) of the monster kits---including the monster rods---in Aurora-style long box reproductions beginning in 1999. They contracted Monogram to use their molds to produce the kits. In cases where the original molds weren't available, Polar Lights created NEW molds using vintage Aurora-produced kits as patterns. They also created new horror kits (Psycho House, Sleepy Hollow Headless Horseman, and huge, 16” tall Godzilla), but ceased production in 2004 when Racing Champions (RC2) bought out Playing Mantis for its die-cast division, Johnny Lightning.

Former Playing Mantis Inc. owner Thomas Lowe later bought back Polar Lights as part of his new company named Round 2. His company continues to reissue Aurora kits, but now in the square, “Glow In The Dark”-type boxes Aurora used in the 70s.

Later, a former distributor of Polar Lights products created a new company named Moebius that released Dr. Jekyll as Mr. Hyde and Gigantic Frankenstein (A.K.A. Big Frankie) in Aurora-style reproduction boxes also. Moebius has also created new monster kits of The Mummy, Frankenstein (alone and with his bride), Dracula, The Munster's House, and many sci-fi TV series based kits.

Monarch has also entered the market creating NEW kits packaged in the Aurora-style long boxes. Nosferatu, The Ghost of the Forgotten Prisoner, and Gorgo are a few of their offerings.

Some of the original Aurora models have been changed over the years:

  • Frankenstein came in a deeper box (It conformed to the same size as the other monster boxes)

  • Dracula's face was resculpted to avoid having to pay a royalty to the Bela Lugosi estate.

  • Hunchback's face was made to look more like Cagney's version of Quasimodo.

  • Some of the vegetation on King Kong's base was eliminated.

  • Some of the pieces were eliminated from the Bride of Frankenstein's kit.

  • Strap was added to Godzilla's Go Cart parachute

  • Godzilla's Go Cart was renamed The Go Cart

It's still possible to complete a collection of the original 13 Aurora kits without paying too much. The most difficult (and therefore most expensive) kit to find is the Phantom of the Opera. Luckily, Monogram issued it as part of their Luminators line of glow in the dark kits in 1992. Two years later they reissued the Phantom as just a regular kit. Both can be had for less than $30 each. CineModels reissued it in 1994 in the Aurora-style long box. That is the most expensive of the lot and usually commands at least $50.00. Each of the other 12 kits can probably be attained for less than $20 each.

The reason I happen to know quite a bit about this subject is that I collected as much of Polar Lights' output as I could. I kept track of all variations I found, and I compiled it on-line for sharing with others at www.phrankenstign.com. It is a free, not-for-profit reference site I put together over the years. It's nearly complete. Hopefully I'll be able to finish it this year.

 

 

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Posted by Postwar Paul on Friday, April 21, 2017 10:01 PM

Penny Trains

This is the Polar Lights kit I've always wanted to build.  But I doubt I could do it anywhere near as well as this builder did!

 

That ' s a classic that still looks modern. It would be fun to build ! 

What a great show ! 

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Posted by thesiding on Friday, April 21, 2017 10:13 PM
They have also made new Lost in Space Jupiter 2 Seaviww (WAAAY BIGGER ) And Forbidden Planet C57D diorama
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Posted by Postwar Paul on Friday, April 21, 2017 11:30 PM

I am inside running the postwar stuff today, too hot to be outside. Ran the 2055, she's running great. The 2037 got in a few laps. My only Lionel diesels, the 202, and 627 took a few spins. I think I'll talk trains, and keep my opinions to myself. 

Mr. P, you put together a great list, trains, and models. Nuff said...

Paul

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Posted by Penny Trains on Saturday, April 22, 2017 7:02 PM

thesiding
They have also made new Lost in Space Jupiter 2 Seaviww (WAAAY BIGGER ) And Forbidden Planet C57D diorama
 

I tried to build a resin kit version of the Jupiter 2 back in the late 80's.  All I really made was a mess!  Laugh  Contour putty EVERYWHERE!  Laugh

Back to trains, here's my current "want list".

Prewar:  I need reliable O gauge motive power first and foremost:

  • My 259 wobbles due to worn bearings so I need to either replace the motor or the entire locomotive with a runner
  • I have 3 of the 3200 series American Flyer freight cars and a tender but no loco the right size to pull them.

  • This little guy just isn't quite right for the job!  Smile, Wink & Grin
  • 600 series hopper and tank car

Postwar:

  • 3494 Poultry Dispatch sweeper stock car
  • 3444 Erie cop and hobo gondola
  • 3459/3469 Automatic dump car
  • 3562 Barrel car: I prefer the -75 orange version
  • 6475 Pickles vat car
  • 6454 Boxcars: Erie and SP first then the others
  • 3474 WP operating boxcar
  • 6417 Pennsy N5c caboose

MPC:

  • 8466/8467 Amtrak F3
  • 8664/8667 Amtrak FA
  • 19608 (6315) Sunoco Aviation Services tank car

American Flyer S:

  • Passenger cars: I have none

Other stuff:

  • Colber Oklahoma Oil Gusher
  • Plasticville FB-1 Frosty Bar in salmon and chrome

 

A waking Lithium Flower just about to bloom

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Posted by phrankenstign on Saturday, April 22, 2017 7:36 PM

 

===================================================

EDIT: I was replying to someone's (I can't remember who's) comment stating he meant no disrespect, but he disagreed with two of my points.  He thought Lon Chaney's portrayal of "The Phantom of the Opera" was used as the basis for Aurora's model kit.  He also attributed Aurora's "The Mummy"  model kit to have been patterned after Boris Karloff's "The Mummy" role.  After I finished replying to it, I noticed his post had been deleted.  ???

===================================================

 

 

I don't mind having a difference of opinion with anybody.  I shouldn't feel disrespected, and I don't.  I like discussing all kinds of subjects, and I welcome differing views.

 

Anyway, after some cool pics I gathered together you'll find my response to the points you brought up:

 

Phantom and Hunchback Comparisons

My comments were mainly about the box art.  At the very top of this collage, it does look like Lon Chaney (1st row, 1st pic) was used as a source for the actual model (2nd row, 1st pic) due to the prominent cheekbones.  However James Cagney's portrayal of Lon Chaney (1st row, 2nd pic) in "Man of a Thousand Faces" (1957) must have been used as a source for the box art (2nd row, 2nd pic & 4th row, 1st pic).  The crooked snarl and wrinkled cheeks on Cagney's face look exactly like the box

 

As for the original Hunchback box art (2nd row, 4th pic), it is plain to see its similarity to Anthony Quinn's portrayal of Quasimodo (3rd row, 2nd pic) in "The Hunchback of Notre Dame" (1956).  The actual plastic model (3rd row, 1st pic) has short hair (you can plainly see his ears) and his shirt makes a "V" shape.  That is also true of Anthony Quinn's look.  Lon Chaney's Quasimodo has long hair covering his ears with his shirt having fallen all the way down.  The blockhead shape of Chaney's look is the only thing the model has in common with it.  It appears that if the model's jaw line was thinner in a "V" shape, the face would look much more like Anthony Quinn.

The revised Beatle-ized Hunchback box art (2nd row, 3rd pic) doesn't look like either of them in my opinion.

Who did the sculptors originally use as a source?  We'll probably never know for sure with these two.  The box art is much more apparent though as you can see.

 

As for The Mummy, there's simply no question about it.  Boris Karloff played the role of Im-Ho-tep in Universal's The Mummy (1932).  Yes, he did undergo the experience of being made up fully from head to toe to look like a mummy.  However In-ho-tep had the full use of both eyes and both arms.

In Universal's effort to create a Mummy franchise, they re-used footage from that 1932 film to create the origin of the new mummy, Kharis.  He could be brought back to life with a tea made from Tanna leaves.  The first in the entry was entitled, "The Mummy's Hand" (1940).  Tom Tyler---later to star in Republic's "Adventures of Captain Marvel" (1941)---was chosen to play Kharis.  His portrayal of Kharis retained the use of both eyes and both hands, although he suffered from a stiff right elbow and stiff left leg.  The High Priest of Karnak, who brought Kharis back to life, told him more Tanna leaf fluid would give him full mobility.

Then came Universal's first sequel to the Kharis mummy saga, "The Mummy's Tomb" (1942).  Lon Chaney Jr. took over the roll of Kharis along with the scars Kharis suffered at the end of "The Mummy's Hand".  There, Kharis had been trying to ingest the Tanna leaf tea that had spilled onto the floor, when a fiery brazier had been overturned onto him.  Although Kharis was immediately englufed in flames, the sequel revealed he survived despite being "seared, twisted, and maimed".  His right eye had been obliterated, and his right hand had been rendered useless.

In the pics below, you'll find Boris Karloff as The Mummy using his eye(s) (1st row, 1st pic), and using his right hand (1st row, 2nd pic).  He's using both eyes as Im-Ho-Tep (2nd row, 1st pic).  (Although only one eye is visible in my pic (1st row, 1st pic), both eyes clearly glisten during that scene.)

Kharis (Tom Tyler) is using both eyes, arms, and hands (3rd row, 1st pic).

Kharis (Lon Chaney) is unable to use his right eye, right arm, and right hand (4th row)

The box art for Aurora's "The Mummy" model (1st row, 3rd pic) and the actual model (2nd row, 2nd pic) both depict a mummy with a useless right eye and right arm.  Lon Chaney's Kharis is the only one like that.

btw Creighton Chaney was Lon Chaney's son.  He used his own name early in his career, but later started being credited as either "Lon Chaney Jr." or "Lon Chaney".  He is credited as "Lon Chaney" in the 3 Kharis mummy movies he made for Universal Pictures.

Aurora Mummy Comparisons

  • Member since
    August, 2010
  • From: Henrico, VA
  • 6,331 posts
Posted by Firelock76 on Sunday, April 23, 2017 9:40 AM

Penny Trains

This is the Polar Lights kit I've always wanted to build.  But I doubt I could do it anywhere near as well as this builder did!

 

Let me tell you, the original Starship Enterprise was a work of sheer genius.  Fifty years later it STILL looks good, it looks right, it looks like what you'd imagine a space ship 200 years from now might look like, (why wouldn't they want it to look good as well as "fly" good?) and it just makes sense.

Gene Roddenberry wanted a look for the ship that exuded power, but not with the usual fictional space ship flames and exhaust.  The design team led by Matt Jeffries certainly delivered, and very few "Star Trek" ships in the ensuing years have looked as good.  Hey, very few sci-fi ships in any film or TV show have looked as good.  "Enterprise" is the gold standard.

The "USS Enterprise" herself was as beloved a character as all the others.  They shouldn't have "killed" her in "The Search For Spock" film, but that's another story.

 

  • Member since
    November, 2011
  • 74 posts
Posted by Postwar Paul on Monday, April 24, 2017 10:50 PM

Mr. P,

 you're doing a great job ! I mean it ! You've done A lot of research, and it shows. I felt bad for ever having said anything. And I'll try to use some restraint in the future. It's a very complete list you have, and it's cool. I was just happy to see pictures of that Marx set again. Brought back a lot of great memories. I think we may have inadvertently hijacked this forum. Whoops ! Didn't mean to do that, either. There' s a lot of entertainment in those old movies, we both enjoy. It's all good ! 

Peace out

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