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SUNDAY PUZZLE FUN 8-29-21 SCOUT SALUTE! PART 2

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  • Member since
    July 2020
  • 552 posts
SUNDAY PUZZLE FUN 8-29-21 SCOUT SALUTE! PART 2
Posted by pennytrains on Saturday, August 28, 2021 5:19 PM

SCOUT SALUTE!  PART 2
55 WORDS

  1. Now we get to the actual (_ _ _ _ _) locos, starting with the No. 1001.  (_ _ _ _) was the only driving force behind this loco’s creation, and, frankly, this loco cheapened the entire product line.  In more than fifty years of rail fanning, I’ve never seen a real (_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _) that’s a 100% match for this design.
  2. Nevertheless, the 1001 was the loco chosen to head (_ _ _ _ _ _ ‘ _) new Scout Line in 1948.  It was the first steam (_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _) with a (_ _ _ _ _ _ _) boiler and employed Lionel’s now infamous plastic bodied (_ _ _ _ _), the bane of repairman and operator alike.  Only the prewar “New (_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _) Motor” operated less reliably.
  3. Maybe I’m being a bit too negative, but how can we appreciate the (_ _ _ _ _ _) if we don’t recognize the (_ _ _ _ _ _ _)?  And it’s the scout (_ _ _ _ _ _ _) that deserves the prize for “Gobbler of the Year” for 1948 in my humble opinion.
  4. Lionel’s sales philosophy had always been and still is to entice (_ _ _ _ _ _ _) set buyers into buying ancillary items.  Namely track, accessories and additional (_ _ _ _).  So, why start consumers off with couplers that are (_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _) with the rest of your line?
  5. It’s doubtful that decision makers at Lionel really intended to (_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _) a complete line of freight, and maybe even (_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _) cars, using their new “(_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _)” uncoupler.  So the kids who got them between 1948 and 51, and the (_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _) who run them today, have very limited options.
  6. How limited?  Just (_ _ _ _) freight cars came equipped with “scout” couplers.  They are the Nos. 1002 (_ _ _ _ _ _ _), 1004 (_ _ _) Car, 1005 (_ _ _) Car and 1007 (_ _ _ _ _ _ _).  Thankfully, there are a few (_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _) to keep us searching for complete sets.
  7. And speaking of (_ _ _ _), there were two initially.  Set No. 1111 was priced at $15.95 in 1948, or $180.68 in today’s dollars, and set No. 1112 for $18.95 ($214.66).  Both included a No. 1011 25 watt (_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _) and the No. 1009 (_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _) Track Section.  But the extra $3 bought you the No. 1004 (_ _ _ _ - _ _ _ _) Box Car and two extra sections of No. 1018 straight track.
  8. Luckily, all you need to do to make a No. 1001 loco compatible with standard (_ _ _ _ _ _) coupler equipment is to swap out the No. 1001T (_ _ _ _ _ _) for one without the dreaded couplers.  A No. 1050T (_ _ _ _ _ - _ _ _ _) model is a good choice, or a No. 6001T if you’re a “Lionel Scout” purist.
  9. Similarly, if you had a No. 1101 (_ _ _ - _ _ _ _) steamer, a small (_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _) tender like the 1060T or 1130T make for fine replacements.  The No. 1101 loco used the 1654 boiler, and because it was paired with a No. 1001T “(_ _ _ _ _ _ - _ _ _ _ _)” tender, it’s the reason why we associate this boiler style with the Scout Line, even though it wasn’t part of the page 4 ad in 1948, as this loco was (_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _).
  10. If you want a complete (_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _) of scout locos, and technically that’s a grand total of (_ _ _ _ _) steamers, you’ll need to find a factory (_ _ _ _ _).  Some die - cast 1101’s were mistakenly (_ _ _ _ _ _) - stamped 1001, thereby bringing the value of this little 2-4-2 on par with No. 685 (_ _ _ _ _ _ _)!
  11. Next in line is the No. 1110 of 1949 and 1951-52.  While it’s immediate predecessor, the 1101, had a (_ _ _ _ _) frame motor, late 1949 production 1110’s introduced us to the (_ _ _ _ _) E-Unit lever protruding through the boiler top.  Before that, even plastic motored locos used the traditional (_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _) lever introduced on (_ _ _ _ _ _) locos.
  12. 1951 produced 1110’s are perhaps the least (_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _) of all Lionel Scout locomotives.  Why?  They used the quirky “(_ _ _ _) in the face” die - cast boiler created for the No. 6110 in 1950.  But the No. 6110 was unique beyond it’s oddball (_ _ _ _ _) unit arrangement.  It’s the only 2-4-2 with a (_ _ _ _ _) metal Lionel Scout tender equipped with scout (_ _ _ _ _ _) and a (_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _) nuckle coupler; the 6001T.
  13. Another (_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _) you’ll have to find is a late 51 or 1952 produced 1110.  These locos continued to employ the “ugly (_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _)” 6110 boiler shell, but had the unnecessary smoke hole (_ _ _ _ _ _ - _ _).  Look for a faint circle above the lens-less (_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _).
  14. Scout number eight in our tally is the No. 1120 of 1950.  Virtually identical to 1110’s manufactured in 1949, the 1120 is the only 2-4-2 to be equipped with both (_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _) and a Lionel Scout tender.  The extra pulling power doesn’t help it’s (_ _ _ _ _) on the collector market though, and an 1120 should be easy to find.

    To be continued…

Big Smile  Same me, different spelling!  Big Smile

  • Member since
    July 2020
  • 552 posts
Posted by pennytrains on Friday, September 3, 2021 3:55 PM

SCOUT SALUTE!  PART 2
55 WORDS

  1. Now we get to the actual (SCOUT) locos, starting with the No. 1001.  (COST) was the only driving force behind this loco’s creation, and, frankly, this loco cheapened the entire product line.  In more than fifty years of rail fanning, I’ve never seen a real (PROTOTYPE) that’s a 100% match for this design.
  2. Nevertheless, the 1001 was the loco chosen to head (LIONEL ‘ S) new Scout Line in 1948.  It was the first steam (LOCOMOTIVE) with a (PLASTIC) boiler and employed Lionel’s now infamous plastic bodied (MOTOR), the bane of repairman and operator alike.  Only the prewar “New (DEPARTURE) Motor” operated less reliably.
  3. Maybe I’m being a bit too negative, but how can we appreciate the (EAGLES) if we don’t recognize the (TURKEYS)?  And it’s the scout (COUPLER) that deserves the prize for “Gobbler of the Year” for 1948 in my humble opinion.
  4. Lionel’s sales philosophy had always been and still is to entice (STARTER) set buyers into buying ancillary items.  Namely track, accessories and additional (CARS).  So, why start consumers off with couplers that are (INCOMPATIBLE) with the rest of your line?
  5. It’s doubtful that decision makers at Lionel really intended to (MANUFACTURE) a complete line of freight, and maybe even (PASSENGER) cars, using their new “(MANUMATIC)” uncoupler.  So the kids who got them between 1948 and 51, and the (COLLECTORS) who run them today, have very limited options.
  6. How limited?  Just (FOUR) freight cars came equipped with “scout” couplers.  They are the Nos. 1002 (GONDOLA), 1004 (BOX) Car, 1005 (OIL) Car and 1007 (CABOOSE).  Thankfully, there are a few (VARIATIONS) to keep us searching for complete sets.
  7. And speaking of (SETS), there were two initially.  Set No. 1111 was priced at $15.95 in 1948, or $180.68 in today’s dollars, and set No. 1112 for $18.95 ($214.66).  Both included a No. 1011 25 watt (TRANSFORMER) and the No. 1009 (UNCOUPLING) Track Section.  But the extra $3 bought you the No. 1004 (BABY - RUTH) Box Car and two extra sections of No. 1018 straight track.
  8. Luckily, all you need to do to make a No. 1001 loco compatible with standard (NUCKLE) coupler equipment is to swap out the No. 1001T (TENDER) for one without the dreaded couplers.  A No. 1050T (SLOPE - BACK) model is a good choice, or a No. 6001T if you’re a “Lionel Scout” purist.
  9. Similarly, if you had a No. 1101 (DIE - CAST) steamer, a small (STREAMLINED) tender like the 1060T or 1130T make for fine replacements.  The No. 1101 loco used the 1654 boiler, and because it was paired with a No. 1001T “(LIONEL - SCOUT)” tender, it’s the reason why we associate this boiler style with the Scout Line, even though it wasn’t part of the page 4 ad in 1948, as this loco was (UNCATALOGED).
  10. If you want a complete (COLLECTION) of scout locos, and technically that’s a grand total of (EIGHT) steamers, you’ll need to find a factory (ERROR).  Some die - cast 1101’s were mistakenly (RUBBER) - stamped 1001, thereby bringing the value of this little 2-4-2 on par with No. 685 (HUDSONS)!
  11. Next in line is the No. 1110 of 1949 and 1951-52.  While it’s immediate predecessor, the 1101, had a (METAL) frame motor, late 1949 production 1110’s introduced us to the (FIBER) E-Unit lever protruding through the boiler top.  Before that, even plastic motored locos used the traditional (ALUMINUM) lever introduced on (PREWAR) locos.
  12. 1951 produced 1110’s are perhaps the least (DESIRABLE) of all Lionel Scout locomotives.  Why?  They used the quirky “(HOLE) in the face” die - cast boiler created for the No. 6110 in 1950.  But the No. 6110 was unique beyond it’s oddball (SMOKE) unit arrangement.  It’s the only 2-4-2 with a (SHEET) metal Lionel Scout tender equipped with scout (TRUCKS) and a (MAGNETIC) nuckle coupler; the 6001T.
  13. Another (VARIATION) you’ll have to find is a late 51 or 1952 produced 1110.  These locos continued to employ the “ugly (DUCKLING)” 6110 boiler shell, but had the unnecessary smoke hole (FILLED - IN).  Look for a faint circle above the lens-less (HEADLIGHT).
  14. Scout number eight in our tally is the No. 1120 of 1950.  Virtually identical to 1110’s manufactured in 1949, the 1120 is the only 2-4-2 to be equipped with both (MAGNETRACTION) and a Lionel Scout tender.  The extra pulling power doesn’t help it’s (VALUE) on the collector market though, and an 1120 should be easy to find.

    To be continued…

FYI: I'll be offline for a few days so part 3 will not come till Saturday the 11th.

Big Smile  Same me, different spelling!  Big Smile

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