Difference in Lionel Switches - So Many, So Little Info

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Difference in Lionel Switches - So Many, So Little Info
Posted by mikedinmpls on Sunday, October 12, 2014 8:26 PM

Can some explain the difference in all the Lionel tubular track switches?

I’m trying to run all O gauge (no O27) becuase I have an older train that will probably derail on the O27, plus I don't want to have to deal with shims if I mix track.  That said, I’m having a hard time finding switches.

A lot of the online stores sell the right or left hand O31 turnouts but not both. Some places it’s on back order. It seems the 6-14062 and 6-14063 turnouts are the most recent (per the 2014 Lionel catalogue) but no one online seems to stock them. I also see the 6-5132 and 6-5133 in some stores, but like I said you can only seem to find a left or a right but not both. And then I see O22 switches that supposedly have a 31″ curve? How does that work? Does the 22 in the O22 mean something different? And what about the Lionel 3010 and 3011 switches?  I found a service document from Lionel for them, but I can't find them in ANY stores.  I also recall seeing a switch that didn't have the full 10" straight section or curved section, but it came with smaller pieces of track to make them longer.  I don't see those in stores or online much either.

Why are there so many switches, why is it so hard to find them, why is there so little information on them and which ones are acutally still in production?

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Posted by ADCX Rob on Monday, November 17, 2014 12:05 AM

mikedinmpls

6-14062 and 6-14063 turnouts

These are the "current" catalog numbers for the original 022 style switch which was introduced in the 1930's.

mikedinmpls
I also see the 6-5132 and 6-5133 in some stores, but like I said you can only seem to find a left or a right but not both.

These were the catalog numbers used for the original 022 style switch which was introduced in the 1930's, upon their reintroduction in the 1980's.

mikedinmpls
And then I see O22 switches that supposedly have a 31″ curve? How does that work?

022 is the catalog number for the original 022 style switch which was introduced in the 1930's. It is a 31" switch in that the curved section has the equivalent of one 45 degree piece of "O" gauge track, or 14.14" radius as measured to the center rail.

mikedinmpls
And what about the Lionel 3010 and 3011 switches?

These were ill-designed switches made by LTI to replace the original 022 style switch with detachable leg sections for layout flexibility.

mikedinmpls
Why are there so many switches, why is it so hard to find them, why is there so little information on them and which ones are acutally still in production?

Lionel has made it clear that they are only making tubular track in batches, to order, from now on.

There are so many switches in the secondary market now that there should be no restriction on your building a layout. For best operation, get original 022 switches from 1938-1969 that have been cleaned and tuned.

Rob

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Posted by BigAl 956 on Monday, November 17, 2014 11:24 AM

Sounds like all you want is a Lionel #022 switch. The venerable 022 has the overlapping footprint of a standard O31 curve and strait. They are plentiful on eBay.Just type Lionel 022 (not O22) into a search and you will find all you could ever need.

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Posted by servoguy on Tuesday, November 18, 2014 5:08 PM

The original 022 switches are the best O gauge switches you can get.  If you look up my post on restoring them to proper operation, and do as I have described, the switches will be bullet proof and last for a very long time without any further work.

022/711 switch operating pblms

Google it.  It is a long post.

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Posted by phillyreading on Friday, November 21, 2014 9:40 AM
The 022 switches were the first Lionel switch made for 031 track in the 1930's and the one I think is still the best switch that was made by Lionel. Since then there have been a few newer switches made by Lionel that keep the original curve size but have different stock numbers for them. Like the 6-5133, the 6-23010 & 23011 that have add-on pieces included, and 6-14062 & 14063 the newer Lionel switches. The 6-5133 has an internal wiring problem with long term use, at least it shorted out the wire on me with normal use. The 6-23010 & 23011 have a bad rap and deserve it too, as they break down under normal use; especially if you use that switch with any Williams engine.
Interested in southest Pennsylvania railroads; Reading & Northern, Reading Company, Reading Lines, Philadelphia & Reading.
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Posted by ADCX Rob on Friday, November 21, 2014 10:00 AM

phillyreading
The 022 switches were the first Lionel switch made for 031 track in the 1930's...

I have 021 & 022 O-gauge switches that were made prior to 1938 and are all metal construction. One pair is illuminated, the other isn't, I can't remember which is which.

Rob

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Posted by Boyd on Friday, November 28, 2014 10:37 PM
Are you running O or 027 profile track? If 027 then look for K-Line 42" switches. Not made anymore but made in L & R 027 manual or powdered,,,, or O gauge profile. Not sure if they made those in both manual & powered.

Modeling the "Fargo Area Rapid Transit" in O scale 3 rail.

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Posted by Rob412 on Saturday, November 29, 2014 11:36 AM
If you contact Nicholas Smith Trains they have loads of 0-31, 0-42, and 0-72 switches for O gauge tubular track.
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Posted by gvdobler on Sunday, December 14, 2014 8:30 PM

Sooo,,were there no 027 switches? The 031 switch would seem to not work out with 027.

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Posted by lionelsoni on Tuesday, December 16, 2014 11:20 AM

Of course there were; but the original poster wrote, "I'm trying to run all O gauge (no O27)".  Do you need more information about O27 turnouts?

(Note the difference between use of "O" for the gauge and "0" as a digit in a part number.  So, for example, "O42" and "042" mean two different things.)

Bob Nelson

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Posted by gvdobler on Wednesday, December 17, 2014 9:34 PM

lionelsoni

Of course there were; but the original poster wrote, "I'm trying to run all O gauge (no O27)".  Do you need more information about O27 turnouts?

(Note the difference between use of "O" for the gauge and "0" as a digit in a part number.  So, for example, "O42" and "042" mean two different things.)

 

Sorry for not being clear. Just trying to catch up. I have a fastrack layout that I set up for the holidays, but thinking of switching to O (tubular) for lower noise, just sorting it out.

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Posted by Father Christmas on Friday, January 10, 2020 4:30 PM

I am new to Lionel 0-gauge trains, I have a post-war steam engine set with 0-31 tubular track and two 0-22 remote controlled switches.  Your above post about all the various types of Lionel has caused me to write you --

First -How can I what switch I have, they say they are 0-22, I no longer have the boxes for them, so I do not know the model #.

Second - I have been told that these switches are non-derailing and if I set up a self-reversing layout, the 0-22 switches will automatically switch when the train comes to an open switch and avoid a derailing.

Can you help me with these questions??

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Posted by BigAl 956 on Thursday, January 16, 2020 9:47 AM

Father Christmas
First -How can I what switch I have, they say they are 0-22, I no longer have the boxes for them, so I do not know the model #. Second - I have been told that these switches are non-derailing and if I set up a self-reversing layout, the 0-22 switches will automatically switch when the train comes to an open switch and avoid a derailing.

As you may have noted from this thread the venerable Lionel 022 switch has been around forever and is the tube track gold standard for switches for a long time. 022 switches are clearly marked with a plate that has the number on them. If your not sure thats what they are just Google image search 'Lionel 022 switch'. 

They are non-derailing as you describe. However you must have the insulation pins installed on the open ends of the switch to insure this feature operates properly.

Here is a link to a video from Lionel that shows switch wiring in more detail...

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_0McntbmQ9I

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Posted by NNJRailfan on Friday, January 24, 2020 12:35 PM

I've serviced, repaired and installed nearly two dozen post-war 022s on several of my layouts that I acquired mostly on ebay.  They really are dependable but aren't indestructible, so treat them gently.  Not all manufacturers and era of locomotives (pre-war, post-war, contemporary) run through them cleanly; the depth of the frogs are too shallow for pre-war wheel flanges (they jump up on them) and too narrow for Marx's "fat wheels".  If post-war and contemporary are your thing, it's worth getting one to try out and they are commonly available.  Ideally you want to buy switches that have the two opaque white insulating pins, light covers and switch controllers, but all can be purchased separately.

If you like K-Line's Super-K and Super-Snap track, they mate beautifully with 022s and O tubular rail.  A company called O-Gauge Reproductions made 022 profile switches in the Super-K style, but I'm not sure if they're still in business.

This car stops at ALL railroad crossings!

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