Old Standard Guage Lionel

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  • Member since
    April 2003
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Old Standard Guage Lionel
Posted by Anonymous on Monday, January 29, 2001 4:32 PM
I'm new to this site. I love old Lionels and only own three sets, right now. One is a Standard guage Lionel for which I'm trying to find more information. I inherited the train from my father, who bought it used from a collector about 40 years ago. I remember as a child going to this persons home to get it, but don't recall much about it, other than it was a filthy mess and my dad put me to work with some cleaner and #0000 steel wool cleaning the track sections. The engine is red and resembles an old over-head electric, inter-urban type engine. The number on the engine is "Lionel No.8". The 4 engine wheels are soft cast metal. My father was a machinist and machined 2 replacement wheels which were disintegrating, but I do still have them. The cars are passenger, including an end-car with an observation platform on it.

I would like to find out more about this train. I don't even know if the cars were part of the original set with the engine? Any help, direction or sources, would be appreciated.
  • Member since
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  • From: US
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Posted by Algonquin on Monday, January 29, 2001 10:34 PM
Hi Tracy,

The Lionel 8 and 8E 0-4-0 Electric Locomotives were manufactured from 1925 to 1932. This was the smallest and cheapest electric locomotive Lionel made at the time.

The locomotive was made in cataloged colors of maroon, olive green, mojave and red. The red version exists in two versions, a cream strip at the bottom of the cab and cream window trim and a second version with no stripe and brass window trim.

This locomotive was in sets that included 500 series freight cars or 337 and 338 passenger cars.

All versions of this locomotive have two head lights and a whistle.

The 337 pullman and 338 observation passenger cars are the smallest Standard gauge cars Lionel made. The cars are 12 inches long and came stamped "lionel Lines", "New York Central" or "Illinos Central". A number of colors were made and all are relatively common.

The 337 and 338 cars came in red with cream trim, mojave with maroon trim and olive with maroon trim.

I hope this information helps.

Tim P.

A penny saved is a penny earned. But every once in a while it is good to treat yourself to a gum ball.

  • Member since
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Posted by Anonymous on Wednesday, January 31, 2001 3:58 PM
Timothy:

Thank you very much! This is a great start and the most specific information I've been able to get on this set. If you don't mind, I'm going to get some additional information off the cars and pass it back to you, as by your description, the cars don't seem to be the correct ones original to the set. The engine description was right on target.

Again, thanks!

tmattern@rmrc.net
  • Member since
    January 2001
  • From: US
  • 440 posts
Posted by Algonquin on Wednesday, January 31, 2001 9:40 PM
Tracy,

Relative to the cars, provide as much detail as you can, such as:

-car body colors
-trim colors such as windows
-car type(baggage, observation, or passenger)
-Any numbers or lettering and where it is located on the car
-truck trim brass(gold) or nickle (silver)
-car length
-Any other markings

This will help to identify them. I am looking forward to hearing from you. As we get closer to identifing the cars I can scan some of the pictures I have and e-mail them to you.

Tim P.

A penny saved is a penny earned. But every once in a while it is good to treat yourself to a gum ball.

  • Member since
    April 2003
  • 302,278 posts
Posted by Anonymous on Thursday, February 1, 2001 10:45 AM
Tim:

Duly noted and will detail individually. I appreciate the advice. Any suggestions or opinions on good books or resources on the old stuff?
  • Member since
    January 2001
  • From: US
  • 440 posts
Posted by Algonquin on Thursday, February 1, 2001 12:05 PM
Hi Tracy,

There are lots of reference books available. Kalmbach, here at Trains.com, publishes the Greenberg Guides. These cover the history of standard and O-gauge and S-gauge trains. The Greenberg guides cover most manufacturers and toy scales from the turn of the century (1900) to today. There are also Greenberg guides providing repair and operating instuctions as well as parts lists and price guides. Most of these book range from about 10 to 30 dollars each. Some you can buy through this site. Most should be available through most hobby stores.

TM Books and Videos also publishes a line of train collector books and price guides. These should also be available through most hobby stores.

I am looking forward to hearing the details of the cars you have.

Tim P.

A penny saved is a penny earned. But every once in a while it is good to treat yourself to a gum ball.

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