I DID NOT KNOW THAT . . . . .

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Posted by Anonymous on Sunday, December 07, 2003 11:03 PM
QUOTE: Originally posted by jhhtrainsplanes

A short quizz . . . . .[?]


During WWII American Locomotive Company also made which of the following?

A. Navy subs

B. Airplanes

C. Army tanks

D. Bombs





OK [B)]

TANKS . . . . . and BOMBS


Now I know how Alex feels. [:(]
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Posted by Anonymous on Sunday, December 07, 2003 11:14 PM
"CROW AGAIN . . . . . YUCK", said Jim while wiping the egg off his face. [|)]
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Posted by coalminer3 on Monday, December 08, 2003 2:39 PM
Now I am really reaching back into what's left of my memory.

A king post is a supporting post that extends vertically from a crossbeam to the apex of a triangular truss. King posts were used in forms of maritime construction, and IIRC, also in certain types of bridge construction; they still are as far as I know.

They're not to be confused with queen posts which are one of two upright suporting posts set vertically between the rafters and the tie beam at equal distances from the apex of a roof.

Never know what you'll find out...incidentally, ALCO ran ads during wartime explaining some of their defense-industry related activity - they appeared mostly in news magazines.

"This is the modern Navy - we don't walk the plank!"

work safe

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Posted by Anonymous on Tuesday, December 09, 2003 11:37 AM
coalminer3 [:)] [:D] [;)]

Thanks for the info on the kingposts. I was actually going to make a post and ask if anyone could and would explain what they were. You saved me the trouble. [8D]

Thanks, again. [^]
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Posted by Anonymous on Tuesday, December 09, 2003 11:40 AM
trainman223 [:)]

squeeze [:)]

464484 [:)]


Welcome one and all to the forums. Glad to have you here. [:D]

464484[:)] You gotta be a steam fan [:D] . That is just super with me. [;)]
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Posted by Trainnut484 on Tuesday, December 09, 2003 5:37 PM
QUOTE: Originally posted by jhhtrainsplanes

trainman223 [:)]

squeeze [:)]

464484 [:)]


Welcome one and all to the forums. Glad to have you here. [:D]

464484[:)] You gotta be a steam fan [:D] . That is just super with me. [;)]


Hey Jim,
You can't go wrong with 484 in your name[;)]. I should know [:D]

Take care,

Russell
All the Way!
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Posted by Anonymous on Thursday, January 01, 2004 9:00 AM
From the Today In History website . . . . . . . . . .

1862 President Abraham Lincoln signs the Emancipation Proclamation, declaring that all slaves in the rebel states are free.


I will post some railroad related stuff later today. [;)]
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Posted by Anonymous on Monday, January 05, 2004 11:11 AM
QUOTE: Originally posted by coalminer3

Now I am really reaching back into what's left of my memory.

A king post is a supporting post that extends vertically from a crossbeam to the apex of a triangular truss. King posts were used in forms of maritime construction, and IIRC, also in certain types of bridge construction; they still are as far as I know.

They're not to be confused with queen posts which are one of two upright suporting posts set vertically between the rafters and the tie beam at equal distances from the apex of a roof.

Never know what you'll find out...incidentally, ALCO ran ads during wartime explaining some of their defense-industry related activity - they appeared mostly in news magazines.

"This is the modern Navy - we don't walk the plank!"

work safe




Kingposts are also used for maritime towing operations to prevent the towline from being wrapped around the superstructure or other structures on the deck. They usually aren't all that high, just enough to keep the towline within safe towing angles. We used them on my salvage ship (USS Opportune ARS41).

Joe
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Posted by coalminer3 on Monday, January 05, 2004 12:04 PM
Hi Joe:

Like I said, it gets dangerous when I rely on what's left of my memory.....

work safe
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Posted by espeefoamer on Thursday, January 08, 2004 7:24 PM
QUOTE: Originally posted by 464484

I think I read that the SP put air horns on their Daylight 484's because the sound could penetrate fog better and thus be safer at road crossings. I have recordings of 4449's air horn they sound a lot like a GG1.

Now that's not so bad!
[8D]I have heard the air horns on both the 4449,and on GG1's.They sound alike.[:)]
Ride Amtrak. Cats Rule, Dogs Drool.
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Posted by ironhorseman on Tuesday, March 09, 2004 1:46 PM
Today, March 9, is Leland Stanford's birthday.

http://www.encyclopedia.com/html/s/stanfordl1.asp

yad sdrawkcab s'ti

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