Brazilian Texas type locomotives

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Brazilian Texas type locomotives
Posted by Anonymous on Friday, September 26, 2003 9:37 PM
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Posted by Fr.Al on Sunday, May 31, 2020 1:23 PM

Ok, I'll bite. What about Brazilian Texas type locomotives? We're they narrow gauge or what? Any still running?

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Posted by Miningman on Sunday, May 31, 2020 1:41 PM

I reply in 17 years.. you will get your answer in 2037.

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Posted by Fr.Al on Sunday, May 31, 2020 1:49 PM

I get it. But as you know, I'm technologically challenged. I attempt to log in, and when I finally succeed, I end up with unanswered posts of years past.

NDG
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Posted by NDG on Sunday, May 31, 2020 4:23 PM

 

Re. Texas Types, Brazil.
 
One exploded 1981. The remaining had B P Reduced, then retired.
 
 
 
More on Internet.
 

Thank You.

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Posted by Overmod on Monday, June 1, 2020 5:31 AM

Baldwin and Alco both, I think.  In the same period as the GELSA locomotives.  Amazing what modern design can put on metre gauge, both steam and diesel...

Replaced by 2-10-2 Skodas improved by Porta, with about ¾ the TE each.  I agree they should have tried the EAR 59s for that service.

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Posted by CSSHEGEWISCH on Monday, June 1, 2020 10:14 AM

EAR's Class 59's are impressive locomotives but they would have had to have been re-gauged from Cape gauge to meter gauge (just under three inches of difference).

The daily commute is part of everyday life but I get two rides a day out of it. Paul
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Posted by Overmod on Monday, June 1, 2020 2:56 PM

CSSHEGEWISCH
EAR's Class 59's are impressive locomotives but they would have had to have been re-gauged from Cape gauge to meter gauge (just under three inches of difference).

Don't know where you get this; they were built metre-gauge and stayed that way.

Another potential contender might have been the Burmese GD and GE classes, of roughly late-Forties vintage (the GEs being diverted to the Assam-Bengal line which also had Garratts of its own).

The Cape-regauging proposal was for a rigid-frame locomotive, I don't remember offhand what but it's in the NGDF posts somewhere, which we're going to be given the 'Russian Decapod' treatment -- wider tires centered on the drivers with the flanges moved inboard.  There was some question whether this would fully clear the spring rigging or perhaps brake gear; the Australian expedient of 'reversible dish' in the driver centers would probably not have been cost-efficient.  Presumably any of these regauging flavors could have been applied to Cape-gauge Garratts to much the same extent, with comparable concerns...

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