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FALLEN FLAGS RAILROADS IN THE SOUTH

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  • Member since
    April 2003
  • 305,206 posts
Posted by Anonymous on Saturday, August 2, 2003 8:24 PM
The thing is, railroads of the South have always gotten a little less press than, say, the Pennsy, NYC, Santa Fe, SP or Milwaukee Road simply because these lines were shorter, smaller in size and influence, and not as close to major, major cities of the U.S. For instance, none of the railroads of the Southeast reached either New York City, Los Angeles, or Chicago during the 50s or 60s, and these cities were where there were the heaviest concentrations of modelers and rail enthusiasts. Model makers and railroad-interest publications have to make a living, too. It sold more magazines to feature lines that more or less everybody knew about (say, PRR, NYC or Santa Fe) than ones more geographically restricted (say, the Central of Georgia). Be that as it may, it has been nice and gratifying in the last decade or so to see the beginning of interest in Southeastern fallen flags. Model makers are finally starting to offer their products in Southeastern-railroad paint schemes and the model and railroad magazines are starting to feature the old Southeastern lines more and more. I think, and I'm just guessing, that since there are practically only two lines left in the Western United States that much of the "here's what's going on with the Western Mountain Railroad of the Month" (like you used to see all the time in railroad mag's) is pretty much a thing of the past. Anyway, I'll post anything you'd like me to post about the Seaboard Air Line, Central of Georgia, or the Georgia Group (GA R.R./A&WP/W of A).

  • Member since
    April 2003
  • 305,206 posts
Posted by Anonymous on Saturday, August 2, 2003 8:24 PM
The thing is, railroads of the South have always gotten a little less press than, say, the Pennsy, NYC, Santa Fe, SP or Milwaukee Road simply because these lines were shorter, smaller in size and influence, and not as close to major, major cities of the U.S. For instance, none of the railroads of the Southeast reached either New York City, Los Angeles, or Chicago during the 50s or 60s, and these cities were where there were the heaviest concentrations of modelers and rail enthusiasts. Model makers and railroad-interest publications have to make a living, too. It sold more magazines to feature lines that more or less everybody knew about (say, PRR, NYC or Santa Fe) than ones more geographically restricted (say, the Central of Georgia). Be that as it may, it has been nice and gratifying in the last decade or so to see the beginning of interest in Southeastern fallen flags. Model makers are finally starting to offer their products in Southeastern-railroad paint schemes and the model and railroad magazines are starting to feature the old Southeastern lines more and more. I think, and I'm just guessing, that since there are practically only two lines left in the Western United States that much of the "here's what's going on with the Western Mountain Railroad of the Month" (like you used to see all the time in railroad mag's) is pretty much a thing of the past. Anyway, I'll post anything you'd like me to post about the Seaboard Air Line, Central of Georgia, or the Georgia Group (GA R.R./A&WP/W of A).

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