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Posted by cnw4001 on Friday, November 11, 2005 10:44 AM
How about taking the train to ride an excursion train?

Back in high school in Cincinnati there was an excursion on a short line between Paris, Kentucky and Frankfort, Ky.

Best part was the trip began on the L & N between Cincinnati and Paris where those on the excursion switched to the shortline. Then on the return you got on the L & N and rode back to Cincinnati.

Great way for an excursion, take the train to ride the train!

Dale
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Posted by alstom on Friday, November 11, 2005 12:13 PM
This is quite an interesting group here on Classic Trains, making your own club-like threads. It's kind of a brilliant idea. I stop by here every now and then, and it's interesting to see what you've had to say.
Richard Click here to go to my rail videos! Click here to go to my rail photos! .........
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Posted by siberianmo on Friday, November 11, 2005 12:33 PM
Hello cnw4001 Dale and alstom Richard Appreciate your visits! [tup]

Cincinnati was a great railroading town - used to have family there. Excursion trains only "count" when there are no regularly scheduled passenger trains! [swg] Actually the rule of thumb, so to speak, is if it has steel wheels rolling on steel track - it counts! Thanx ........

If you think this thread is interesting, check out the bar 'n grill called "Our" Place!


Tom[4:-)][oX)]
Happy Railroading! Siberianmo
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Posted by siberianmo on Friday, November 11, 2005 12:34 PM
”Our” Place Commemoration of Veterans/Remembrance Day 2005


Number 4 of 9

. . . . .”Keep “Em Rollin’ . . or Else!”. . . . .
says grandpappy engine 2414 to a 1942 Santa Fe Freight Diesel


“Back in ’98, in the Spanish-American War,” reminisces little Old-Timer 2414, “20 cars was an average-length freight train. By World War I, we’d upped our Santa Fe freights to an average 35.9 cars. Not bad railroadin’, that.”

“Not bad is right,” answers the big new freight Diesel, “but not good enough for World War II. Now we’ve stretched ‘em out another 41% to 50.9 cars, and those cars are bigger, loaded heavier, and rolling farther and faster.”

“Good work, son,” says Old-Timer. “Yours is the BIG war job. Keep ‘em rollin’ – or else!”

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . KEEP ‘EM ROLLIN’ – OR ELSE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

* No nation that does not possess efficient mass transportation can hope to win a modern war. In America that mass transportation job is squarely up to her railroads. If they fail, we lose.

Neither battle gallantry nor industrial wizardry alone will turn the tide. To meet this tremendous responsibility, we ask for every possible consideration in the allocation of materials for vitally essential repairs, maintenance and new equipment.

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . DAILY THE LOAD INCREASES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

To date, the railroads haves met 100% the staggering demands born of this global war. Many have helped make that record possible – the War Department, the Office of Defense Transportation, civilian shippers and travelers everywhere.

In the first six month of 1942 with 25% fewer locomotives, the Santa Fe moved 94% more freight ton-miles and 27% more military and civilian passenger miles than in the first six months of 1918 in World War I.

Daily the load increases. No man knows what the peak will be. We do know there is a limit to the performance that can be squeezed out of existing equipment.

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . SANTA FE SYSTEM LINES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

. . . . . . . . . . SERVING THE SOUTHWEST FOR 70 YEARS . . . . . . . . . . .
. . . . . . . . . . . . Buy U. S. War Bonds – They Identify You” . . . . . . . . . . . .

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

More to follow ………..

Tom [4:-)] [oX)]
Happy Railroading! Siberianmo
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Posted by siberianmo on Friday, November 11, 2005 12:39 PM
”Our” Place Commemoration of Veterans/Remembrance Day 2005


Number 5 of 9

Like Father in 1917 ~ Like Son, in 1942 ~

. . . . . Americans feel at home in Britain. . . . .

Americans have always felt at home in Britain . . . in peace time . . . or in war.

Whether they have come over, equipped with guide books, golf clubs and cameras for a quiet sojourn among Britain’s peaceful hedgerows, historic landmarks, and the ancestral beginnings of American ideals, laws and traditions or whether they have come, as in 1942 with steel helmets, bayonets, tanks and bombers in defenses of these very ideals, by which both nations are so closely bound together in common heritage, Americans feel that they are truly among friends – in Britain.

Year after year, in happier times, British Railways have brought American travelers along the magic trail that leads into the heart of Britain – the glorious, colourful panorama of History, Literature, Tradition and Ideals.

Until Victory comes, as it must and will, British Railways continue to maintain their contact with their American Friends, through their General Traffic Manager, C. M. Turner, 9 Rockerfeller Plaza, New York, N. Y.

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . BRITISH RAILWAYS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

More to follow ………..

Tom [4:-)] [oX)]
Happy Railroading! Siberianmo
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Posted by siberianmo on Friday, November 11, 2005 2:27 PM
”Our” Place Commemoration of Veterans/Remembrance Day 2005


Number 6 of 9

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A BOY ON A HILL-TOP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

He used to wave at me from that hill . . . we lived just beyond it. He knew the exact time I’d be by . . . and I’d wave to him from the cab.

And on my time off, I’d go to the hill with him, and we’d sit together, my son and I, and wait for the trains to come along. We’d hear their whistle calling across the distance . . . then see the long plume of smoke come into view, racing like the wind . . . and as they thundered by, we’d both wave to the engineer.

Maybe there’s something in heredity – he seemed to have the railroad in his blood. When he finished school . . . well I rolled into the yards one day, and there he was – long longer my little boy, but a man. A railroad man!

He might someday have taken over my run. But, last December 7th, he was twenty-one . . .

I don’t know where he is now. He got is two weeks leave before he left. But whenever I pass that hill, I seem to see him, as he used to be, before he became a man and had to shoulder the responsibility of being a man.

I know he wants to come back to the railroad . . . and I’m going to see that he does come back! These Japs and *** who started all this – when they creep up on him and all his fellows in arms – even if they come with a thousand tanks and mobile guns and all the dive-bombers they can find in hell – he and his buddies will meet them with fifty thousand tanks and a hundred thousand planes and two hundred thousand guns. My job, now, is to get that equipment to the ships that’ll take it to him and to all the other American boys like him, no matter where they are.

And it can rain and snow and sleet and it can blow, and nothing will stop me. I’ll get the stuff through to him. I am getting it through to him. You only have to lie still in the night and listen to the rumble of the trains – the trains everywhere – to know that I’m speaking the truth. It’s my son, and it’s my country, whose lives are at stake, and I can’t fail and I won’t.

. . . . . . . . . . Published as a tribute to the railroad workers of America . . . . . . . . . .

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . NEW YORK CENTRAL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

. . . . . Invest in Victory . . . . . Buy United States War Bonds and Stamps . . . . .

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

More to follow ………..

Tom [4:-)] [oX)]
Happy Railroading! Siberianmo
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Posted by siberianmo on Friday, November 11, 2005 3:05 PM
”Our” Place Commemoration of Veterans/Remembrance Day 2005


Number 7 of 9

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

. . . . . . . . . . HE WHO ”steps up” ALSO SERVES . . . . . . . . . .

UNION PACIFIC is doing its share to meet the nation’s vital need for dependable transportation. It’s a job we’re proud to do. Over the “the strategic middle route” connecting East with West, our gigantic locomotives are hauling not only war materials but also thousands of Uncle Sam’s men in uniform.

Thus, it is apparent that travelers may not always find it possible to obtain their preferred accommodations. Perhaps only coach seats or upper berths will be available. To Union Pacific patrons, who we have had the pleasure of serving and will continue to serve to the best of our ability, we would like to say, “he who steps up also serves” and express our thanks for your cooperation.

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . The Progresssive . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

. . . . . . . . . . UNION PACIFIC RAILROAD . . . . . . . . . .

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . The Strategic Middle Route . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . “Buy U. S. War Bonds – They Identify You” . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

More to follow ………..

Tom [4:-)] [oX)]
Happy Railroading! Siberianmo
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Posted by siberianmo on Friday, November 11, 2005 4:01 PM
”Our” Place Commemoration of Veterans/Remembrance Day 2005


Number 8 of 9

ON THEIR WAY

Shades are drawn down. Lights dim low. The landscape is blotted out . . . there’s just the hum of the speeding train.

These boys know what it means – the troop train is approaching the troop ships.

Some draw a deep breath. A soldier fumbles for a letter. Another wonders if he can make a last telephone call. Another draws out a crumpled photograph.

No, travelers don’t see this – but the trainmen of the Pennsylvania Railroad do, daily. And more so than ever now. As the swelling tide of American youth – fine and fit streams overseas . . .

Of course, it takes a lot of equipment for these troop movements – but with what remains we are doing our best to serve all essential travelers . . . efficiently, courteously.

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . BUY UNITED STATES WAR BONDS AND STAMPS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Pennsylvania Railroad

More to follow ………..

Tom [4:-)] [oX)]
Happy Railroading! Siberianmo
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Posted by agentatascadero on Friday, November 11, 2005 4:25 PM
Well, in honor of Veterans' Day, I have to offer this one, perhaps unique. I joined the Army on Haloween Day, 1966, just ahead of the draft. My air transport to San Antonio (Ft Sam Houston) had been aranged. But Wait! The orders authorize air OR rail transport, and Pullman accomodations are authorized. It became necessary to make my own arrangements as transportation had NEVER arranged for rail travel. From San Francisco, I resisted the temptation to go via Halifax! Armed with my trusty Guide I routed myself on ATSF #2 the SF Chief in the SF-Houston Pullman to Milano, TX, where there is a little (or unknown) known connection possible to the MP Texas Eagle to San Antonio. So obscure that the local agent had never seen it done previously. My only regret is missing the opportunity for a clrcle trip, such as coming home via Tennessee Pass and the Royal Gorge, or some such thing. I should also mention my only GG1 cab ride, which was "caused" by my railfanning in uniform one day in NYC.
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Posted by siberianmo on Friday, November 11, 2005 4:45 PM
”Our” Place Commemoration of Veterans/Remembrance Day 2005


Number 9 of 9

A NEW DAY DAWNS IN RAILROADING

War traffic has more than doubled the volume of freight hauled by the Western Pacific Railroad from Salt Lake City to San Francisco. Wherever the going it toughest n this rugged route, General Motors Diesel freight locomotives have kept this vast stream of vital munitions moving steadily.

War building is being rushed ahead with reliable General Motors Diesel power. In the days to come this dependable, economical power will be ready to do the hard jobs of peace.


Throughout history, wars have set up new milestones of transportation progress. And with this war, it is the General Motors Diesel Locomotive that is ushering in the new era. What advances the future will bring are already apparent in the present performance of these locomotives and the way they are helping to meet the abnormal demands upon the railroads today.

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . KEEP AMERICA STRONG * BUY MORE BONDS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

LOCOMOTIVES . . ……………………ELECTRO-MOTIVE DIVISION, La Grange, Ill.

ENGINES . . 150 to 2000 H.P. …….. CLEVELAND DIESEL ENGINE DIVISION, Cleveland, Ohio

ENGINES . . . 15 to 250 H.P. ……… DETROIT DIESEL ENGINE DIVISION, Detroit, Mich.

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . GM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . GENERAL MOTORS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . DIESEL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . POWER . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

That’s it!

It has been my pleasure to provide these 9 WWII era Posts to you all. [tup]

Tom [4:-)] [oX)]
Happy Railroading! Siberianmo
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    September 2005
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Posted by BudKarr on Friday, November 11, 2005 7:26 PM
Good Evening Captain Tom,

Just a final word - thank you for this extra effort in providing one and all with such a well thought out and orchestrated presentation of WWII railroad advertisements.

Good show!

BK
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    April 2003
  • 302,230 posts
Posted by Anonymous on Saturday, November 12, 2005 1:22 PM
I LOVE the ads! Please keep 'em coming!

Al Smalling
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    February 2004
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Posted by siberianmo on Saturday, November 12, 2005 1:47 PM
For: agentatascadero

Thanx for participating in our Veterans/Remembrance Day activities! [tup]

For: BudKarr BK -and- smalling_60626 Allen

Glad the advertisements "worked" for you both. Surely you don't expect me to maintain the pace of yesterday, do you [?] [swg] <phew>

Appreciate you both stoppin' by ...... [tup]

Tom[4:-)][oX)]
Happy Railroading! Siberianmo
  • Member since
    April 2003
  • 302,230 posts
Posted by Anonymous on Saturday, November 12, 2005 2:18 PM
No, siberianmo, I don't expect the massive postings you made yesterday, but if you're having any qualms about posting future ads--don't have 'em. Post away!

Gratefully,
Allen Smalling (smalling_60626)
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Posted by siberianmo on Saturday, November 12, 2005 3:48 PM
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ENCORE! ENCORE! . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Number 1 of 9:

. . . . . . . . . . more Vital than gold . . . . . . . . . .

All the gold buried in Fort Knox, Ky., is less important to Victory than the rich iron ore deposits of the Mesabi, Cuyuna, and Vermillion ranges of northern Minnesota.

The Mesabi range along contains the world’s largest developed deposits, and much of this ore lies in open pits.

From these pits giant shovels scoop the vital “red dust” into Great Northern cars which dump it a few hours later into the docks in Duluth and Superior, at the Head of the Lakes. There ore boats are swiftly loaded for delivery to the nation’s steel mills.

When the shipping season closed December 5, new mining records had been set on the mining ranges, and Great Northern Railway handled nearly 29,000,000 long tons – a third of the Lake Superior district’s total production.

With the necessity of preserving equipment, Great Northern, between shipping seasons, is reconditioning motive power, cars, trackage and its Allouez docks in Superior making ready for a still bigger job in 1943.

The fabulous iron ore deposits in Minnesota are only part of the wealth contributed to America by the Zone of Plenty – and delivered by this vital artery of transportation.

GREAT NORTHERN RAILWAY
ROUTE OF THE EMPIRE BUILDER - BETWEEN THE GREAT LAKES AND THE PACIFIC

IN THE ZONE Of Plenty

*********************************************************************************

Number 2 of 9

”OVER HILL, OVER DALE, WE WILL RIDE THE IRON RAIL . . .

AS THE PULLMAN’S GO ROLLING ALONG”


Growing and GOING
that’s the story of our armed forces.

Growing every day and going every night, for long distance troop movements are usually under the cover of darkness, in Pullman sleeping cars.

It’s a big job for the railroads to haul so many cars. And a big job for Pullman to provide them. But it’s a welcome job for both of us, one we’re proud and happy we were prepared to handle.

Prepared? Oh, yes. The way Pullman and the railroads worked together in peacetime – through the Pullman “pool” of sleeping cars – fitted right into the wartime picture.

Here’s how that “pool” works:

> Railroad passenger traffic in different parts of the country fluctuates with the season. Travel south, for instance, is heaviest in winter. And travel north increases in the summer.

> If each railroad owned and operated enough sleeping cars to handle its own peak loads, many of those cars would be idle most of the year.

> With the Pullman “pool,” however, over one hundred different railroads share in the ability of a sleeping car fleet big enough to handle their combined requirements at any one time. As the travel loads shifts north, south, east or west, these cars shift with it. They are seldom idle for when fewer cars are needed on one railroad, more are needed on another.

Now that war has come this “pool”operation of sleeping cars enables troop trains to be made up on short notice – at widely scattered points – and routed over any combination of railroads.

That’s what we meant when we said that Pullman and the railroads were prepared to handle the tremendous mass movement of troops that goes on constantly.

It takes a lot of sleeping cars to do it. Almost drains the Pullman “pool” at times. As a result, civilian travelers are sometimes inconvenienced.

But the war comes first with the railroads and first with Pullman – just as it comes first with you!

AN AVERAGE OF MORE THAN 25,000 TROOPS A NIGHT NOW

GO PULLMAN
Buy War Bonds and Stamps Regularly!


************************************************************************************

Number 3 of 9

One passenger – or one million

Those carefree days when a man could almost as easily as he’d are out for the duration.

Folks have to share the railroads with the Army and Navy, just as they’re sharing everything else these days.

We wish we could still offer you an unlimited choice of departure times and accommodations, but more than a million and half troops per month must be cared for first.

That takes a lot of cars and a lot of locomotives.

It takes the time of a lot of railroad men, for these movements must be handled swiftly and secretly.

After meeting all the vast demands of a nation at war, we are not always able to serve the public as well as we’d like to – but nevertheless with a little cooperation, we’ll get you where you have to go.

Transportation is our business as well as our duty - and we want you to know that every railroad man worthy of the name has his heart in the job.

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Association of . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . American Railroads . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Washington, D.C. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . United for Victory
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

*****************************************************************************

Number 4 of 9

. . . . .”Keep “Em Rollin’ . . or Else!”. . . . .
says grandpappy engine 2414 to a 1942 Santa Fe Freight Diesel


“Back in ’98, in the Spanish-American War,” reminisces little Old-Timer 2414, “20 cars was an average-length freight train. By World War I, we’d upped our Santa Fe freights to an average 35.9 cars. Not bad railroadin’, that.”

“Not bad is right,” answers the big new freight Diesel, “but not good enough for World War II. Now we’ve stretched ‘em out another 41% to 50.9 cars, and those cars are bigger, loaded heavier, and rolling farther and faster.”

“Good work, son,” says Old-Timer. “Yours is the BIG war job. Keep ‘em rollin’ – or else!”

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . KEEP ‘EM ROLLIN’ – OR ELSE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

* No nation that does not possess efficient mass transportation can hope to win a modern war. In America that mass transportation job is squarely up to her railroads. If they fail, we lose.

Neither battle gallantry nor industrial wizardry alone will turn the tide. To meet this tremendous responsibility, we ask for every possible consideration in the allocation of materials for vitally essential repairs, maintenance and new equipment.

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . DAILY THE LOAD INCREASES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

To date, the railroads haves met 100% the staggering demands born of this global war. Many have helped make that record possible – the War Department, the Office of Defense Transportation, civilian shippers and travelers everywhere.

In the first six month of 1942 with 25% fewer locomotives, the Santa Fe moved 94% more freight ton-miles and 27% more military and civilian passenger miles than in the first six months of 1918 in World War I.

Daily the load increases. No man knows what the peak will be. We do know there is a limit to the performance that can be squeezed out of existing equipment.

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . SANTA FE SYSTEM LINES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

. . . . . . . . . . SERVING THE SOUTHWEST FOR 70 YEARS . . . . . . . . . . .
. . . . . . . . . . . . Buy U. S. War Bonds – They Identify You” . . . . . . . . . . . .

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

**********************************************************************************

Number 5 of 9

Like Father in 1917 ~ Like Son, in 1942 ~

. . . . . Americans feel at home in Britain. . . . .

Americans have always felt at home in Britain . . . in peace time . . . or in war.

Whether they have come over, equipped with guide books, golf clubs and cameras for a quiet sojourn among Britain’s peaceful hedgerows, historic landmarks, and the ancestral beginnings of American ideals, laws and traditions or whether they have come, as in 1942 with steel helmets, bayonets, tanks and bombers in defenses of these very ideals, by which both nations are so closely bound together in common heritage, Americans feel that they are truly among friends – in Britain.

Year after year, in happier times, British Railways have brought American travelers along the magic trail that leads into the heart of Britain – the glorious, colourful panorama of History, Literature, Tradition and Ideals.

Until Victory comes, as it must and will, British Railways continue to maintain their contact with their American Friends, through their General Traffic Manager, C. M. Turner, 9 Rockerfeller Plaza, New York, N. Y.

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . BRITISH RAILWAYS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

**************************************************************************************

Number 6 of 9

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A BOY ON A HILL-TOP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

He used to wave at me from that hill . . . we lived just beyond it. He knew the exact time I’d be by . . . and I’d wave to him from the cab.

And on my time off, I’d go to the hill with him, and we’d sit together, my son and I, and wait for the trains to come along. We’d hear their whistle calling across the distance . . . then see the long plume of smoke come into view, racing like the wind . . . and as they thundered by, we’d both wave to the engineer.

Maybe there’s something in heredity – he seemed to have the railroad in his blood. When he finished school . . . well I rolled into the yards one day, and there he was – long longer my little boy, but a man. A railroad man!

He might someday have taken over my run. But, last December 7th, he was twenty-one . . .

I don’t know where he is now. He got is two weeks leave before he left. But whenever I pass that hill, I seem to see him, as he used to be, before he became a man and had to shoulder the responsibility of being a man.

I know he wants to come back to the railroad . . . and I’m going to see that he does come back! These Japs and *** who started all this – when they creep up on him and all his fellows in arms – even if they come with a thousand tanks and mobile guns and all the dive-bombers they can find in hell – he and his buddies will meet them with fifty thousand tanks and a hundred thousand planes and two hundred thousand guns. My job, now, is to get that equipment to the ships that’ll take it to him and to all the other American boys like him, no matter where they are.

And it can rain and snow and sleet and it can blow, and nothing will stop me. I’ll get the stuff through to him. I am getting it through to him. You only have to lie still in the night and listen to the rumble of the trains – the trains everywhere – to know that I’m speaking the truth. It’s my son, and it’s my country, whose lives are at stake, and I can’t fail and I won’t.

. . . . . . . . . . Published as a tribute to the railroad workers of America . . . . . . . . . .

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . NEW YORK CENTRAL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

. . . . . Invest in Victory . . . . . Buy United States War Bonds and Stamps . . . . .

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .


***********************************************************************************

Number 7 of 9

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

. . . . . . . . . . HE WHO ”steps up” ALSO SERVES . . . . . . . . . .

UNION PACIFIC is doing its share to meet the nation’s vital need for dependable transportation. It’s a job we’re proud to do. Over the “the strategic middle route” connecting East with West, our gigantic locomotives are hauling not only war materials but also thousands of Uncle Sam’s men in uniform.

Thus, it is apparent that travelers may not always find it possible to obtain their preferred accommodations. Perhaps only coach seats or upper berths will be available. To Union Pacific patrons, who we have had the pleasure of serving and will continue to serve to the best of our ability, we would like to say, “he who steps up also serves” and express our thanks for your cooperation.

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . The Progresssive . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

. . . . . . . . . . UNION PACIFIC RAILROAD . . . . . . . . . .

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . The Strategic Middle Route . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . “Buy U. S. War Bonds – They Identify You” . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

**********************************************************************************

Number 8 of 9

ON THEIR WAY

Shades are drawn down. Lights dim low. The landscape is blotted out . . . there’s just the hum of the speeding train.

These boys know what it means – the troop train is approaching the troop ships.

Some draw a deep breath. A soldier fumbles for a letter. Another wonders if he can make a last telephone call. Another draws out a crumpled photograph.

No, travelers don’t see this – but the trainmen of the Pennsylvania Railroad do, daily. And more so than ever now. As the swelling tide of American youth – fine and fit streams overseas . . .

Of course, it takes a lot of equipment for these troop movements – but with what remains we are doing our best to serve all essential travelers . . . efficiently, courteously.

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . BUY UNITED STATES WAR BONDS AND STAMPS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Pennsylvania Railroad


*********************************************************************************

Number 9 of 9

A NEW DAY DAWNS IN RAILROADING

War traffic has more than doubled the volume of freight hauled by the Western Pacific Railroad from Salt Lake City to San Francisco. Wherever the going it toughest n this rugged route, General Motors Diesel freight locomotives have kept this vast stream of vital munitions moving steadily.

War building is being rushed ahead with reliable General Motors Diesel power. In the days to come this dependable, economical power will be ready to do the hard jobs of peace.


Throughout history, wars have set up new milestones of transportation progress. And with this war, it is the General Motors Diesel Locomotive that is ushering in the new era. What advances the future will bring are already apparent in the present performance of these locomotives and the way they are helping to meet the abnormal demands upon the railroads today.

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . KEEP AMERICA STRONG * BUY MORE BONDS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

LOCOMOTIVES . . ……………………ELECTRO-MOTIVE DIVISION, La Grange, Ill.

ENGINES . . 150 to 2000 H.P. …….. CLEVELAND DIESEL ENGINE DIVISION, Cleveland, Ohio

ENGINES . . . 15 to 250 H.P. ……… DETROIT DIESEL ENGINE DIVISION, Detroit, Mich.

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . GM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . GENERAL MOTORS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . DIESEL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . POWER . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

That’s it!

It has been my pleasure to provide these 9 WWII Posts to all of you. [tup]

Tom [4:-)] [oX)]
Happy Railroading! Siberianmo
  • Member since
    April 2003
  • 302,230 posts
Posted by Anonymous on Saturday, November 12, 2005 3:52 PM
My first psgr trip was Aug 1972. I was nine yrs old and went w/my Grandparents to visit family in Dallas. We made a one way trip from Wichita,KS to Ft.Worth on Amtrk 15 the TX Chief. I recall some segments of the trip--Boarding the train at Union Stn about 0430, riding in a bilevel car, passing through southern KS in the early pre dawn hours and crossing through OK during the day and stopping at Ponca City, Guthrie & OK City. Sometime during the day we went to the diner for a meal. Cannot recall what I ate but I do remember the food car was a SF lunch counter diner type. We arrived in Ft.Worth during the afternoon which was about a eight or nine hr ride. On the return home, we took the bus and why this mode of transport was chosen over the train was beyond me. The bus ride did not hold a candle to riding down on the train.
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Posted by espeefoamer on Saturday, November 12, 2005 4:36 PM
My first train ride was on the Southern Pacific's San Joaquin Daylight.My grandparents took my brother and me, to San Francisco.This was in 1961,when I was 9 years old.The train was almost all Daylight painted cars.Some of the head end cars were dark grey and the diner(This was before the Automat infestation) was already in the Sunset scheme.We ate all three meals in the diner,I had pancakes for breakfast. I don't remember what I ate the other two meals, but we had dinner while running along San Pablo bay,and I got a look at the Golden Gate bridge.I remember spending a lot of time in the dome lounge car. After much pressuring from me,my grandfather took movies of our locomotives as we rounded the horseshoe at Caliente. We had an A-B-A set of PAs. At Lathrop,we dropped two coaches for Sacramento,and picked up a yellow coach.For years afterwards I thought this was a UP car as I didn't know about the SP's City of San Francisco coaches.We returned after staying in Frisco for a day.We returned on the Coast Daylight.This train was 20 cars long,all Daylight.painted cars.We rode in a parlor car,but this was placed at the front of the train instead of just ahead of the parlor obs.I wanted to go back and see the observation car but my grandmother told my "It's just like all the other cars".I had read about observation cars and knew they weren't but was unable to convince her of this.I remember having lunch in the diner,I had a green iced tea.I had never seen this before or since.This was not the pale green of today's teas but was more of a bright green. Also,while rounding a curve my brother dumped his root beer into my hamburger,and the waiter had to get me another one. Altogether,this was a great trip.
Ride Amtrak. Cats Rule, Dogs Drool.
  • Member since
    November 2003
  • From: West Coast
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Posted by espeefoamer on Saturday, November 12, 2005 4:40 PM
QUOTE: Originally posted by siberianmo

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ENCORE! ENCORE! . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Number 1 of 9:

. . . . . . . . . . more Vital than gold . . . . . . . . . .

All the gold buried in Fort Knox, Ky., is less important to Victory than the rich iron ore deposits of the Mesabi, Cuyuna, and Vermillion ranges of northern Minnesota.

The Mesabi range along contains the world’s largest developed deposits, and much of this ore lies in open pits.

From these pits giant shovels scoop the vital “red dust” into Great Northern cars which dump it a few hours later into the docks in Duluth and Superior, at the Head of the Lakes. There ore boats are swiftly loaded for delivery to the nation’s steel mills.

When the shipping season closed December 5, new mining records had been set on the mining ranges, and Great Northern Railway handled nearly 29,000,000 long tons – a third of the Lake Superior district’s total production.

With the necessity of preserving equipment, Great Northern, between shipping seasons, is reconditioning motive power, cars, trackage and its Allouez docks in Superior making ready for a still bigger job in 1943.

The fabulous iron ore deposits in Minnesota are only part of the wealth contributed to America by the Zone of Plenty – and delivered by this vital artery of transportation.

GREAT NORTHERN RAILWAY
ROUTE OF THE EMPIRE BUILDER - BETWEEN THE GREAT LAKES AND THE PACIFIC

IN THE ZONE Of Plenty

*********************************************************************************

Number 2 of 9

”OVER HILL, OVER DALE, WE WILL RIDE THE IRON RAIL . . .

AS THE PULLMAN’S GO ROLLING ALONG”


Growing and GOING
that’s the story of our armed forces.

Growing every day and going every night, for long distance troop movements are usually under the cover of darkness, in Pullman sleeping cars.

It’s a big job for the railroads to haul so many cars. And a big job for Pullman to provide them. But it’s a welcome job for both of us, one we’re proud and happy we were prepared to handle.

Prepared? Oh, yes. The way Pullman and the railroads worked together in peacetime – through the Pullman “pool” of sleeping cars – fitted right into the wartime picture.

Here’s how that “pool” works:

> Railroad passenger traffic in different parts of the country fluctuates with the season. Travel south, for instance, is heaviest in winter. And travel north increases in the summer.

> If each railroad owned and operated enough sleeping cars to handle its own peak loads, many of those cars would be idle most of the year.

> With the Pullman “pool,” however, over one hundred different railroads share in the ability of a sleeping car fleet big enough to handle their combined requirements at any one time. As the travel loads shifts north, south, east or west, these cars shift with it. They are seldom idle for when fewer cars are needed on one railroad, more are needed on another.

Now that war has come this “pool”operation of sleeping cars enables troop trains to be made up on short notice – at widely scattered points – and routed over any combination of railroads.

That’s what we meant when we said that Pullman and the railroads were prepared to handle the tremendous mass movement of troops that goes on constantly.

It takes a lot of sleeping cars to do it. Almost drains the Pullman “pool” at times. As a result, civilian travelers are sometimes inconvenienced.

But the war comes first with the railroads and first with Pullman – just as it comes first with you!

AN AVERAGE OF MORE THAN 25,000 TROOPS A NIGHT NOW

GO PULLMAN
Buy War Bonds and Stamps Regularly!


************************************************************************************

Number 3 of 9

One passenger – or one million

Those carefree days when a man could almost as easily as he’d are out for the duration.

Folks have to share the railroads with the Army and Navy, just as they’re sharing everything else these days.

We wish we could still offer you an unlimited choice of departure times and accommodations, but more than a million and half troops per month must be cared for first.

That takes a lot of cars and a lot of locomotives.

It takes the time of a lot of railroad men, for these movements must be handled swiftly and secretly.

After meeting all the vast demands of a nation at war, we are not always able to serve the public as well as we’d like to – but nevertheless with a little cooperation, we’ll get you where you have to go.

Transportation is our business as well as our duty - and we want you to know that every railroad man worthy of the name has his heart in the job.

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Association of . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . American Railroads . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Washington, D.C. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . United for Victory
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

*****************************************************************************

Number 4 of 9

. . . . .”Keep “Em Rollin’ . . or Else!”. . . . .
says grandpappy engine 2414 to a 1942 Santa Fe Freight Diesel


“Back in ’98, in the Spanish-American War,” reminisces little Old-Timer 2414, “20 cars was an average-length freight train. By World War I, we’d upped our Santa Fe freights to an average 35.9 cars. Not bad railroadin’, that.”

“Not bad is right,” answers the big new freight Diesel, “but not good enough for World War II. Now we’ve stretched ‘em out another 41% to 50.9 cars, and those cars are bigger, loaded heavier, and rolling farther and faster.”

“Good work, son,” says Old-Timer. “Yours is the BIG war job. Keep ‘em rollin’ – or else!”

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . KEEP ‘EM ROLLIN’ – OR ELSE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

* No nation that does not possess efficient mass transportation can hope to win a modern war. In America that mass transportation job is squarely up to her railroads. If they fail, we lose.

Neither battle gallantry nor industrial wizardry alone will turn the tide. To meet this tremendous responsibility, we ask for every possible consideration in the allocation of materials for vitally essential repairs, maintenance and new equipment.

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . DAILY THE LOAD INCREASES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

To date, the railroads haves met 100% the staggering demands born of this global war. Many have helped make that record possible – the War Department, the Office of Defense Transportation, civilian shippers and travelers everywhere.

In the first six month of 1942 with 25% fewer locomotives, the Santa Fe moved 94% more freight ton-miles and 27% more military and civilian passenger miles than in the first six months of 1918 in World War I.

Daily the load increases. No man knows what the peak will be. We do know there is a limit to the performance that can be squeezed out of existing equipment.

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . SANTA FE SYSTEM LINES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

. . . . . . . . . . SERVING THE SOUTHWEST FOR 70 YEARS . . . . . . . . . . .
. . . . . . . . . . . . Buy U. S. War Bonds – They Identify You” . . . . . . . . . . . .

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

**********************************************************************************

Number 5 of 9

Like Father in 1917 ~ Like Son, in 1942 ~

. . . . . Americans feel at home in Britain. . . . .

Americans have always felt at home in Britain . . . in peace time . . . or in war.

Whether they have come over, equipped with guide books, golf clubs and cameras for a quiet sojourn among Britain’s peaceful hedgerows, historic landmarks, and the ancestral beginnings of American ideals, laws and traditions or whether they have come, as in 1942 with steel helmets, bayonets, tanks and bombers in defenses of these very ideals, by which both nations are so closely bound together in common heritage, Americans feel that they are truly among friends – in Britain.

Year after year, in happier times, British Railways have brought American travelers along the magic trail that leads into the heart of Britain – the glorious, colourful panorama of History, Literature, Tradition and Ideals.

Until Victory comes, as it must and will, British Railways continue to maintain their contact with their American Friends, through their General Traffic Manager, C. M. Turner, 9 Rockerfeller Plaza, New York, N. Y.

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . BRITISH RAILWAYS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

**************************************************************************************

Number 6 of 9

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A BOY ON A HILL-TOP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

He used to wave at me from that hill . . . we lived just beyond it. He knew the exact time I’d be by . . . and I’d wave to him from the cab.

And on my time off, I’d go to the hill with him, and we’d sit together, my son and I, and wait for the trains to come along. We’d hear their whistle calling across the distance . . . then see the long plume of smoke come into view, racing like the wind . . . and as they thundered by, we’d both wave to the engineer.

Maybe there’s something in heredity – he seemed to have the railroad in his blood. When he finished school . . . well I rolled into the yards one day, and there he was – long longer my little boy, but a man. A railroad man!

He might someday have taken over my run. But, last December 7th, he was twenty-one . . .

I don’t know where he is now. He got is two weeks leave before he left. But whenever I pass that hill, I seem to see him, as he used to be, before he became a man and had to shoulder the responsibility of being a man.

I know he wants to come back to the railroad . . . and I’m going to see that he does come back! These Japs and *** who started all this – when they creep up on him and all his fellows in arms – even if they come with a thousand tanks and mobile guns and all the dive-bombers they can find in hell – he and his buddies will meet them with fifty thousand tanks and a hundred thousand planes and two hundred thousand guns. My job, now, is to get that equipment to the ships that’ll take it to him and to all the other American boys like him, no matter where they are.

And it can rain and snow and sleet and it can blow, and nothing will stop me. I’ll get the stuff through to him. I am getting it through to him. You only have to lie still in the night and listen to the rumble of the trains – the trains everywhere – to know that I’m speaking the truth. It’s my son, and it’s my country, whose lives are at stake, and I can’t fail and I won’t.

. . . . . . . . . . Published as a tribute to the railroad workers of America . . . . . . . . . .

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . NEW YORK CENTRAL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

. . . . . Invest in Victory . . . . . Buy United States War Bonds and Stamps . . . . .

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .


***********************************************************************************

Number 7 of 9

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

. . . . . . . . . . HE WHO ”steps up” ALSO SERVES . . . . . . . . . .

UNION PACIFIC is doing its share to meet the nation’s vital need for dependable transportation. It’s a job we’re proud to do. Over the “the strategic middle route” connecting East with West, our gigantic locomotives are hauling not only war materials but also thousands of Uncle Sam’s men in uniform.

Thus, it is apparent that travelers may not always find it possible to obtain their preferred accommodations. Perhaps only coach seats or upper berths will be available. To Union Pacific patrons, who we have had the pleasure of serving and will continue to serve to the best of our ability, we would like to say, “he who steps up also serves” and express our thanks for your cooperation.

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . The Progresssive . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

. . . . . . . . . . UNION PACIFIC RAILROAD . . . . . . . . . .

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . The Strategic Middle Route . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . “Buy U. S. War Bonds – They Identify You” . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

**********************************************************************************

Number 8 of 9

ON THEIR WAY

Shades are drawn down. Lights dim low. The landscape is blotted out . . . there’s just the hum of the speeding train.

These boys know what it means – the troop train is approaching the troop ships.

Some draw a deep breath. A soldier fumbles for a letter. Another wonders if he can make a last telephone call. Another draws out a crumpled photograph.

No, travelers don’t see this – but the trainmen of the Pennsylvania Railroad do, daily. And more so than ever now. As the swelling tide of American youth – fine and fit streams overseas . . .

Of course, it takes a lot of equipment for these troop movements – but with what remains we are doing our best to serve all essential travelers . . . efficiently, courteously.

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . BUY UNITED STATES WAR BONDS AND STAMPS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Pennsylvania Railroad


*********************************************************************************

Number 9 of 9

A NEW DAY DAWNS IN RAILROADING

War traffic has more than doubled the volume of freight hauled by the Western Pacific Railroad from Salt Lake City to San Francisco. Wherever the going it toughest n this rugged route, General Motors Diesel freight locomotives have kept this vast stream of vital munitions moving steadily.

War building is being rushed ahead with reliable General Motors Diesel power. In the days to come this dependable, economical power will be ready to do the hard jobs of peace.


Throughout history, wars have set up new milestones of transportation progress. And with this war, it is the General Motors Diesel Locomotive that is ushering in the new era. What advances the future will bring are already apparent in the present performance of these locomotives and the way they are helping to meet the abnormal demands upon the railroads today.

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . KEEP AMERICA STRONG * BUY MORE BONDS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

LOCOMOTIVES . . ……………………ELECTRO-MOTIVE DIVISION, La Grange, Ill.

ENGINES . . 150 to 2000 H.P. …….. CLEVELAND DIESEL ENGINE DIVISION, Cleveland, Ohio

ENGINES . . . 15 to 250 H.P. ……… DETROIT DIESEL ENGINE DIVISION, Detroit, Mich.

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . GM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . GENERAL MOTORS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . DIESEL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . POWER . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

That’s it!

It has been my pleasure to provide these 9 WWII Posts to all of you. [tup]

Tom [4:-)] [oX)]

We musten't forget the New Haven ad "The Kid in Lower Twelve" the story of a young soldier going off to war ina Pullman car.
Ride Amtrak. Cats Rule, Dogs Drool.
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Posted by siberianmo on Saturday, November 12, 2005 5:38 PM
Well Dan, if we musn't forget the New Haven ad - why not Post it for us [?]

You kinda threw me off there when I saw my looooooooooooong Post repeated, I thought I had fouled up somewhere - then it "dawned" on me that you quoted the whole thing. [wow]

Tom[4:-)][oX)]
Happy Railroading! Siberianmo
  • Member since
    February 2004
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Posted by siberianmo on Saturday, November 12, 2005 5:40 PM
Some things we NEVER seemto forget - like our FIRST train rides!

Thanx for the stories, sammythebull and espeefoamer Dan [tup]

Tom[4:-)][oX)]
Happy Railroading! Siberianmo
  • Member since
    February 2004
  • From: Chesterfield, Missouri, USA
  • 7,214 posts
Posted by siberianmo on Sunday, November 13, 2005 8:22 AM
G’day All!

PASSENGER TRAIN NOSTALGIA #11

Here’s something to enjoy regarding the Pennsylvania Railroad (PRR) from an advertisement in Classic American Trains


NOW . . . A Complete RECREATION CAR

Especially Designed for Your Pleasure

In daily service on The Jeffersonian, popular all-coach streamliner between New York and St. Louis!
A dramatic highlight in Pennsylvania railroad’s new equipment program, this colorful new recreation car provides amusement and entertainment for all ages. A luxurious game and reading lounge . . . a children’s playroom . . . a sunken buffet lounge . . . miniature movie theatre – pleasure with variety. Be among the first to enjoy it! Reserve a seat on The Jeffersonian on your next trip!

SO ROOMY AND RESTFUL – the new overnight coaches on The Jeffersonian. Only 44 seats to the car – and all reclining! You’ll like the new lighting too – fluorescent, 4 times brighter but easy on the eyes. New-type air-conditioning adds still more comfort.

EXTRA LARGE MODERN WASHROOMS, one for women, one for men at the end of each coach – handsomely decorated – with 3 glistening washstands and 2 toilet annexes.

Enjoy these New Features at Low Coach Fares!

THE JEFFERSONIAN
. . . . . . . . . . Westbound . . . . . . . . . .
Lv. New York . . . . . 6:15 P.M.
Lv. Philadelphia . . . 7:43 P.M.
Lv. Washington . . . 6:20 P.M.
Lv. Baltimore . . . . . 7:05 P.M.
Lv. Harrisburg . . . . .9:42 P.M.
Ar. Columbus . . . . . 6:46 A.M.
Ar. Dayton . . . . . . ..8:21 A.M.
Ar. Indianapolis . . . .9:27 A.M.
Ar. St. Louis . . . . . .1:50 P.M.
. . . . . . . . . . Eastbound . . . . . . . . . .
Lv. St. Louis . . . . . . 1:00 P.M.
Lv. Indianapolis . . . . 5:07 P.M.
Lv. Dayton . . . . . . . .8:13 P.M.
Lv. Columbus . . . . . .9:35 P.M.
Ar. Harrisburg . . . . . 6:51 A.M.
Ar. Baltimore . . . . . . 9:23 A.M.
Ar. Washington . . . .10:10 A.M.
Ar. Philadelphia . . . . .8:52 A.M.
Ar. New York . . . . . .10:25 A.M

Recreation car facilities available to Baltimore and Washington passengers between Harrisburg and St. Louis.

PENNSYLVANIA RAILROAD
. . . . . . . . . . Serving the Nation . . . . . . . . . .


Enjoy! [tup]

Tom[4:-)][oX)]
Happy Railroading! Siberianmo
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  • 331 posts
Posted by BudKarr on Sunday, November 13, 2005 6:16 PM
Hello Captain Tom,

I know you take Sunday's off, or at least most of the day. Thought I would check out this thread, but I see not much is going one other than your fine efforts. Nce photos over at the bar I might add.

Now why would someone copy your entire series on World War II only to re-post it again on this thread? I do not quite get that at all.

Even though I have seen your latest Nostalgia offering before, it brings back some memories of northeast U.S. rail travel. Nice work.,

BK
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Posted by siberianmo on Monday, November 14, 2005 7:35 AM
G’day All!

PASSENGER TRAIN NOSTALGIA #12

Here’s something to ponder with regard to our appreciation and fascination with
Classic Trains. Check out this ad (from The Official Guide of the Railways – 1956)



Look what they’re saying about the Vista-Dome North Coast Limited!

”FOUR VISTA-DOMES . . .
the view really is terrific on the Northern Pacific!”

“Pride of the Northwest . . . a train second to none!”

“One of the top trains in the country”

“A LOVELY STEWARDESS-NURSE . . . so kind to me and my children”

“Most friendly and courteous employees”

“Comfortable trip – delicious meals. Our compliments to the chef”

“THE TRAVELLER’S REST buffet-lounge . . . most unique car we’ve ever seen . . . captures the flavor and romance of the West”

”WON’T YOU BE MY GUEST?”
Now a friendly Stewardess-Nurse welcomes you aboard the Vista-Dome North Coast Limited. You’ll enjoy extra traveling pleasure at no extra cost – in fact, even low Family Fares apply! Heading East or West through the scenic Northwest, you’ll see for yourself why passengers call it . . .

. . . . . One of the world’s Extra Fine trains . . . . .

. . . . . For complete information, write
. . . . . G. W. RODINE, Passenger Traffic Manager . . . . .
. . . . . Northern Pacific Railway, St. Paul 1, Minn. . . . . .

CHICAGO – TWIN CITIES – SPOKANE – PORTLAND – TACOMA – SEATTLE


Enjoy! [tup]

Tom[4:-)][oX)]
Happy Railroading! Siberianmo
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Posted by jlampke on Monday, November 14, 2005 7:58 AM
Thanks for the ads, Tom. Very interesting.
It seems like I read somewhere that the SP had just over 1,100 passenger cars at the beginning of the '60's. Does anyone know how accurate that number is?

Also, does anyone know roughly what percentage of them would've been painted in Daylight colors?

Also, I assume most of them survived through the '60's and were turned over to Amtrak when the latter took over passenger service. Is that correct? Anyone know any numbers there? Was it a give-away or was money exchanged?

What has become of the cars that the SP turned over to Amtrak?

Does anyone care to offer a guess as to how many of the ex-SP pre-1958 Daylight cars still exist? I am interested in cars that would've been pulled behind GS locomotives.
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Posted by siberianmo on Monday, November 14, 2005 9:40 AM
Hello jlampke John!

Glad the ads "work" for you. [tup]

The Southern Pacific had 1002 passenger cars in 1963 (according to "Classic American Railroads").

We have several guys over at "Our" Place who are much more SP oriented than I. Why not drop by [?]

I run a Fallen Flags series for Passenger RRs over there and today there is an Index in the Summary page that lists all Posted thus far.

Catch ya later!

Tom[4:-)][oX)]
Happy Railroading! Siberianmo
  • Member since
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Posted by passengerfan on Monday, November 14, 2005 1:10 PM
Re. Inquiry regarding SP passenger cars.
Amtrak took all of the SP Sunsest Limited cars except for the 10-6 Blunt end cars. SP kept one each of the feature cars for their own Business Fleet. The Budd built cars operated in the Golden State also went to Amtrak.
Amtrak first leased and then purchased a number of what they termed Salvage cars that included some of the prewar Daylight articulated coaches for service in the Reno Fun Train. Amtrak also purchased the 3/4 length domes except for one that was retained by SP. These cars were assigned to the San Francisco Zephyr (Later California Zephyr)
Several SP sleeping cars were leased for a short period then returned to SP for scrapping.
Other then the Budd cars much of the SP equipment was suffering from deferred maintenance by the start of Amtrak.
Remember Amtrak gave priority to Budd cars first then loooked at the other manufacturers cars as needed. That is why so much AT&SF and SCL equipment operated on Amtrak. Also another major supplier of cars to Amtrak was BN.
  • Member since
    December 2001
  • From: Eastern Ohio
  • 615 posts
Posted by cnw4001 on Monday, November 14, 2005 2:38 PM
While growing up in Cincinnati got to see passenger trains from the seven rairoads coming and going at Cincinnati Union Terminal each day.

Something I really enjoyed and clearly miss now.

Dale
  • Member since
    February 2004
  • From: Chesterfield, Missouri, USA
  • 7,214 posts
Posted by siberianmo on Monday, November 14, 2005 3:37 PM
Hey cnw4001 Dale

The last time I was in Cincy's Union Terminal was in 1960 - arrived and departed by the PRR from NYC. Was best man in my buddy's wedding.

I understand there have been some fine things done with that structure and that's good. It has a unique design and is every bit a part of U.S. passenger railroading history as any other terminal in the land.

Used to call Cincinnati "home" during a large part of my 32 year military career. Great city and surrounding area. We were "huge" Big Red Machine" fans back when that team was the class of both leagues. Nice place you call home! [tup]

My early recollections of passenger railroads goes back to the 1940s and Pennsylvania Station in NYC along with Grand Central Terminal. Great places to see the trains - that is if the guy watching the gates would let you go down to the platforms. My grandpa always managed to "work" that out, and off we'd go to check out those gleaming beauties all lined up and ready to get movin'.

Good memories for sure!

Tom[4:-)][oX)]
Happy Railroading! Siberianmo
  • Member since
    December 2003
  • 330 posts
Posted by red p on Monday, November 14, 2005 3:57 PM
Well I stopped in to learn a bit more about passenger trains and consist.
Im looking at add some early Amtrak operations to my mid-70s Penn Central layout
  • Member since
    February 2004
  • From: Chesterfield, Missouri, USA
  • 7,214 posts
Posted by siberianmo on Monday, November 14, 2005 6:19 PM
For: ftwNSengineer

While you are checking out this site - you may also want to visit "Our" Place too.

The discussion there centers more on all kinds of trains - classic of course (real and model).

Appreciate your stopping by! [tup]

Tom[4:-)][oX)]
Happy Railroading! Siberianmo

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