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Public Service of New Jersey

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Posted by Goodtiming on Tuesday, June 15, 2021 6:19 PM

Dave, your post of April 29 @ 4:10pm.... I am 99% sure that this photo is on Palisade Avenue looking north. Note the Public Service sign (partially hidden) on the building on the left. The car on the elevated is heading to Hoboken and east. The street on the immediate left is Ravine Ave while the one just past the PS building will be ferry street.

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Posted by daveklepper on Wednesday, June 16, 2021 6:39 AM

I agree it is on Palesades Avenue.  But it is an Oakland car, and I thought all Oakland sueface tracks were east (or "south") of the Elevated.  And it appears to be turning right to go up the ramp to the Elevated, which would mean that tracks leading to Hoboken go to the right.  So the Jackson car on the Elevated seems to me to berunning from Hoboken, not to Hoboken.

Or do you have a better explanaition.  74 years 

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Posted by daveklepper on Thursday, July 15, 2021 6:56 AM

This photo, also posted earlier, will probably be used in the forthcoming calender of the South Penn Model Traction Club.  They  and I would like to know dates for:

End of jersey City - Newark streetcar  sevice.

Start of S. Kearney and Federal Service

End of S. Kearney line and Federal line  sevices.

Thanks.

 

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Posted by Flintlock76 on Thursday, July 15, 2021 10:11 AM

daveklepper
End of jersey City - Newark streetcar  sevice. Start of S. Kearney and Federal Service End of S. Kearney line and Federal line  sevices.

I think I can help you David.  I hit the Public Service book I've got and came up with the following dates:

End of Jersey City to Newark service was May 1st 1938 when All Service Vehicles (trolley coaches) were substituted for streetcars.

The start of South Kearney service was May 25th 1942.  South Kearney service ended May 15 1948.

The start of Federal service was July 1st 1943.  Service ended August 31st 1945.

Hope that helps!  Let me know if you need other information!

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Posted by daveklepper on Friday, July 16, 2021 3:26 AM

Helps a lot!   Thanks!!

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Posted by Flintlock76 on Friday, July 16, 2021 8:05 AM

You're welcome!  Glad I was of service to you!

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Posted by Overmod on Friday, July 16, 2021 11:02 AM

Flintlock76
Glad I was of service to you!

Public service, that is Angel

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Posted by Flintlock76 on Friday, July 16, 2021 8:36 PM

Overmod
Public service, that is 

You know, about ten years ago I bought a Public Service baseball cap at a train show in Chantilly VA.  The seller gave me a funny look and said:

"You're not from around here, are you?"

I got a good laugh out of that!  I explained I was from northern New Jersey and my favorite uncle worked for PSE&G for thirty years as an electric lineman. 

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Posted by daveklepper on Sunday, July 18, 2021 8:58 AM

1.   What is the name of the PSNJ book, its author, its publisher?

2.   The track to Newark may have remained operational foeeks, months, years, after TT sevice took over.  When were S. Kearny - Newark tracks lifted?  Jackson - Exchange Place (or paved ocver)?

3.  Additional info from Henry Raubembush:

 

 

  1. Looking at the map below, I would guess that the westbound picture of 3258 was taken at the crossing of Hackensack Ave and USI 1-9, which was not then overpassed.  
     
    On  the picture of 3258 and an All-Service bus side by side?  My conclusion is that this in on US 1, between the CNJ connection and the Hackensack River Bridge, looking east.  My guess is that it is probably only a short way east of the connection from the CNJ.   You also showed a picture of the 3258 an 3259 (looks like it was a 2-car trip) in front of the Western Electric plant.  
  2. An unrelated but interesting note (in 1964 for sure as I rode it then) :  That Western Electric plant had its own CNJ commuter train long after this period.  It bridged west from Kearny to the Ironbound section of Newark, and south across the diamond crossing to the N platform of Elizabethport station (to connect to N Jersey Coast trains).  In then backed across the  CNJ main line again, stopped and turned westtoward Plainfield.  It carried a commuter club car named “WEKearny”.
  3.   The Camden trolleys were wide gauge, but did not use the Philadelphia wide gauge.  

 

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Posted by daveklepper on Sunday, July 18, 2021 9:22 AM

Also from Henry:

Here’s a map of the area.  Note the RR track – CNJ then (probably CSA now) the bridges over US 1-9 jut east of Central Avenue.  The South Kearny line must have turned off of of US 1 and run southward parallel to Central Ave.  The Western Elctric plant was west of Central, at the marker of River Terminal – which is the former WE Bldg. 

 

US 1-9 BYP has had many names.  Communipaw Ave in Jersey City (East of the Hackensack), US 1 truck route, US 9 truck route, etc, and Raymond Blvd west of the Passaic in Newark..
Here’s  a street view of the approximate area today.  No visible landmark, but the general appearance is similar.

 

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Posted by Flintlock76 on Sunday, July 18, 2021 11:46 AM

OK David, taking your questions in turn.

The book I got my information from is:

"The Public Service Trolley Lines in New Jersey" by Edward Hamm Jr.  Copyright 1991, and published by Transportation Trails, 9698 W. Judson Road, Polo Illinois, 61064.  (No e-mail address)

Mine's a third printing from 1997.  The book's VERY complete, they're all in there, including the names of the predecessor trolley companies absorbed into the Public Service system.  And it does have route maps as well plus photographs, however the photos complement the text, they're not the main feature. 

When were the South Kearney to Newark lines lifted?  Well, those lines had to be re-laid in 1942 having been previously abandoned in 1938!  They were only re-laid due to transportation needs for the war emergency.  The book doesn't say when they were pulled up after final abandonment in 1948 but it's a safe bet they didn't stay there long, Public Service didn't waste time pulling up tracks when no longer needed, at least where practicable, say on private rights-of-way.  Tracks imbedded in the streets stayed there until they were (typically) paved over.  Occasionally some surface today during heavy road work! 

The book mentions the Jackson Line but Exchange Place isn't on the Jackson Line map. Jackson Line trolley service ended August 7 1949 when it became a Public Service bus line.  Exchange Place is listed on the Jersey City car line which ran from Exchange Place (JC) to Newark (Through Kearney and Harrison).  Jersey City line trolleys stopped running in 1938 when All Service Vehicles replaced the trolleys.

Hope this is of service!  (Public Service?  A nod to Overmod!  Wink

PS:  The book's available from several sources, but as is typical with out of print narrow-interest publications the prices are all over the place.  These are two of the more reasonable ones:

https://www.abebooks.com/9780933449299/Public-Service-Trolley-Lines-New-0933449291/plp

https://www.biblio.com/book/public-service-trolley-lines-new-jersey/d/615057755

 

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Posted by daveklepper on Monday, July 19, 2021 5:10 AM

 

thanks again.

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Posted by Flintlock76 on Monday, July 19, 2021 7:15 AM

You're welcome!

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