Temporary replacement for Photo of the Day

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Posted by Miningman on Monday, July 20, 2020 10:03 AM

Man oh man, the things you can put in a Railroad Station. Of course Pennsylvania Station and Grand Central aren't your everyday station but most big cities had an equivalent or two. 

Was never really fond of that depiction 'Giant Conquerors' until recently. Of course it was almost a badge of honour or an expectation at that time that the well to do or celebrity would perish in a plane crash especially in bad weather.  Still happens actually.

I see Photo OTD still broken.... that's ok I have an exciting lineup sure to stir the pot a bit, or bore you to tears. 

Just back to PRR locomotive economics for a sec... they never bought any FT's but did they at least give it a tryout?  Ditto for the NYCentral. 

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Posted by CSSHEGEWISCH on Monday, July 20, 2020 10:31 AM

New York Central had 4 FTA/B sets on its roster.  PRR didn't have any kind of road diesel until 1945.

The daily commute is part of everyday life but I get two rides a day out of it. Paul
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Posted by Overmod on Monday, July 20, 2020 10:40 AM

Flintlock76
I'll take that Ford Trimotor over that oversized bottle rocket any day of the week!

Yeah, but let's remember that for a few weeks in 1957, the New York Central was only a hole in the Concourse roof away from being a nuclear power.  What other railroad even in the days of the Rail Garrison could make that claim?  Remember they had a full-services nucear engineering company online in Schenectady...

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Posted by Miningman on Monday, July 20, 2020 11:28 AM

CSSH---yes thanks, now I recall! 

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Posted by Miningman on Tuesday, July 21, 2020 12:45 AM

Tuesday July 21 Photo OTD

 

Once upon a time the Southern Pacific was a big deal railroad, dubbed by Trains as the "New Standard of Railroading".  Their colour scheme of their passenger fleets honoured the bright sunny days and the boundless optimism of California. Here is the Southern Pacific in its glorious but too short lived post war passenger services role. The SP dieselized fairly quickly as is shown here with an Alco PA leading what is likely an A-B-A set. SP liked their numerous lights up front, all kinds of differing variations and various do-dads along the top of the lead loco as shown. Antennas and such. 

Somewhere in the train itself is a Conductor, uniformed, with a vest and a pocket watch, and a cap that proudly proclaims Southern Pacific. That's the way it's supposed to be in the New Standard of Railroading. Serious, purposeful, classy, timeless. 

So now the Daylight colours are no more, neither is the Cap, the vest and the pocket watch as the Southern Pacific itself has disappeared. The PA with the do-dads no longer exists. Of course this is all hard to understand as to just what happened, why, and all that and why is it still not so today in this very manner but one thing is certain... it's just plain wrong that it is not.  Pave paradise and put up a parking lot for sure. 

 

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Posted by Overmod on Tuesday, July 21, 2020 3:28 AM

These are relatively late PA-2s built with the upgraded 2250hp 244G engine and water-cooled turbochargers that solved many of the early issues that gave the first series of these passenger engines an unhappy reception.  I believe the engines pictured have been through the ~1956 rebuilding program -- see the intermittent Farr grilles; it looks as if the fancy as-built stainless windshield frames have been painted over.  (As with the late FPA4s these locomotives never had the trim molding behind the cab doors...)

Very likely the 'wheel' radio antenna further dates the scene.

Someone who is a SP fan will likely know the train by the details of the consist, and will know, perhaps with some precision, where the picture was taken... I think this is Portland-Oakland.

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Posted by rcdrye on Tuesday, July 21, 2020 6:34 AM

That would be eastbound (geog. south) train 10, the Shasta Daylight, introduced in 1949 with some new equipment (including the Shasta Club articulated three unit diner/kitchen/lounge) and some cars from earlier Daylights.  By 1954 most of the equipment had lost its fluted siding, but was still in Daylight paint.  SP's last new coaches came from Pullman-Standard in 1954, with 36" x 54" windows that were the next best thing to a dome car.  A 3600 series 3/4 dome rebuilt from a prewar car followed about 1956.  The "Shasta" was reduced to tri-weekly part of the year in 1959 and discontinued in 1967.  Original power was three-unit E7 sets, the PAs took over as early as 1950.  SP's PAs had GE 746 traction motors and dynamic brakes and were quite at home in the mountains until replaced by SDP45s in 1967, too late for the Shasta.  Also common in the 1960s were SP's FP7/F7B sets, which also had dynamic brakes.  The E7s migrated to the Sunset,  Golden State and Coast routes.  SP did have a DB-equipped E8 and nine E9s, but they don't seem to have worked the Shasta or Cascade.

The picture is probably on the Davis-Tehama "West Valley Line" which was the favored line for passenger trains well into the Amtrak era.  Now leased to California Northern.  The Starlight was rerouted over the "East Valley Line" north from Roseville via Marysville and Chico in the 1990s.

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Posted by gmpullman on Tuesday, July 21, 2020 6:38 AM

 

Welcome aboard The Century

 Century_life9 by Edmund, on Flickr

Yes sir, Bedroom A, car 2502 right here captain.

 Century_life7 by Edmund, on Flickr

 

Cocktails? Of course 

 Century_life37 by Edmund, on Flickr

  — and catch up on some of the latest news. What do you think of the way things are in Europe?

 Century_life38 by Edmund, on Flickr

Barely a ripple in my glass. I wonder just how fast we're going?

 Century_life40 by Edmund, on Flickr

Throttle's practically hitting the cab roof!

 Century_life13 by Edmund, on Flickr

Got to slow down to eighty for scooping water at Lydick.

 Century_life20 by Edmund, on Flickr

Sprucing up before dinner —

 Century_life35 by Edmund, on Flickr

Stuffed Celery a la Century, Roast Prime Ribs of Beef, Au Jus, Peach Melba with N.Y.C. Special Ice Cream

 Century_life33 by Edmund, on Flickr

A little night cap before retiring —

 Century_life30 by Edmund, on Flickr

and Chicago in the morning.

 Century_life43 by Edmund, on Flickr

 Century_life49 by Edmund, on Flickr

Regards, Ed

 

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Posted by Flintlock76 on Tuesday, July 21, 2020 8:33 AM

Oh my.  And people gave all that up for more speed, i.e. flying.  Nothing really wrong with that, but how can you compare the Century with being sealed in an aluminum tube with minimal amenities.  Sure, you got there a hell of a lot faster, but is that all there is?

And if you didn't have to be in Chicago yesterday there were other trains like the "Erie Limited."  Certainly not the "Century," but it was a comfortable ride with good amenities and a fine diner. 

Oh well, what are you gonna do?  Times change, some (most) times for the better, sometimes not.  

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Posted by Overmod on Tuesday, July 21, 2020 9:47 AM

gmpullman
Got to slow down to eighty for scooping water at Lydick.

Note the instructive position of the Valve Pilot hand showing what he did to get 80 without moving the throttle... he will crank the reverse back to 'match needles' as the scoop goes up.  The train will accelerate and he will continue to make fine adjustments until running 'on the money' at sustained cruise, probably around 85mph for the Century in that era.

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Posted by Miningman on Tuesday, July 21, 2020 1:10 PM

Appears the Photo of the Day has been restored so I shall retire this thread but keep it in on standby should it be required. 

The pic of the Western Railway of Alabama and its description "storms east out of..." certainly is appropriate. 

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Posted by Flintlock76 on Tuesday, July 21, 2020 3:19 PM

I'm a little confused on this one, "...storms east out of...with the Crescent Limited."  

I thought the Crescent  Was a Southern Railway train.  Is this a section that will meet up with the Southern somewhere? 

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Posted by rcdrye on Tuesday, July 21, 2020 4:08 PM

The Crescent Limited was operated by Southern Washington-Atlanta, Atlanta & West Point/Western Railway of Alabama (West Point Route) Atlanta- Montgomery, and L&N Montgomery-New Orleans.  Southern Railway's through train via the route of today's Crescent was the Southerner.  It's not as strange as you might think.  Southern didn't have a hammerlock on the Alabama Great Southern and New Orleans & Northeastern until the teens, some time after the Crescent was inaugurated.  The Piedmont Limited took the same route, along with some other lesser trains.  All of the participating roads bought postwar streamlined cars specifically for the Crescent.  Through operation ended in the late 1960s, though bits lingered into 1970 when the last WPR passenger trains were discontinued.

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Posted by Miningman on Tuesday, July 21, 2020 6:00 PM

Thanks to rcdrye for that great info on Southern Pacific and The Crescent Route and thanks to Overmod and gm pullman and all the other comments. We have all learned a lot during this short thread and that's really why we are all here. 

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Posted by Flintlock76 on Tuesday, July 21, 2020 9:55 PM

Thanks Mr. Drye!  Good Lord, I had no idea!  

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Posted by Overmod on Tuesday, July 21, 2020 11:21 PM

Brochure for the T.A.T. service:

https://simanaitissays.files.wordpress.com/2012/10/tat2909bl.jpg

Coverage of the initial T.A.T. service route.  Note the civilized Fred Harvey sit-down meals at the transfer points -- and catered luncheons served in the air...

http://www.dreamsmithphotos.com/arrow/airmail_routes/route_31_34/34/tat_route.html

Illustrated (and zoomable!) map of the original T.A.T. route

https://www.davidrumsey.com/luna/servlet/detail/RUMSEY~8~1~2208~190076:Illustrated-Map-of-the-Route-of-Tra

Ceremonial paperweight

 

 

 

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Posted by Overmod on Tuesday, July 21, 2020 11:40 PM

Of course T.A.T. evolved into TWA, but in the meantime there was another interesting development, by the end of 1935:

TWO HUNDRED NINETEEN mph and widened for 14 to 16 open-section-style sleeper berths plus a kind of bedroom for two.  Gets rid of much of the problem with transfers ... and some of the weather and safety issues, too...

https://simanaitissays.files.wordpress.com/2019/04/sleeper36.jpg?w=547&h=760

https://simanaitissays.files.wordpress.com/2019/04/dc114.jpg

https://simanaitissays.files.wordpress.com/2019/04/berthsclosed.jpg?w=547&h=743

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Posted by Overmod on Tuesday, July 21, 2020 11:45 PM

And it was not long before folks realized that 92" widened fuselage could take a much more profitable row of regular seats, and so a little thing called the DC-3 was born...

Not long before Hank lost his girlfriend Phoebe to something much more attractive than absence of bituminous smoke...

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iqP-76KUw8Y

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Posted by Miningman on Wednesday, July 22, 2020 12:56 AM

Isn't that something! A few degrees of separation, great info, thanks Overmod. 

I'm thinking you would have to have some serious sleeping aids, like a ball peen hammer, to get some shut eye back then. Probably would have done it if I was in my twenties but then I would not be able to afford it at that age. Were I older and could afford it then I would know better and stay on the ground. I'd be a nervous wreck. 

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Posted by M636C on Wednesday, July 22, 2020 6:23 AM

Overmod

Of course T.A.T. evolved into TWA, but in the meantime there was another interesting development, by the end of 1935:

TWO HUNDRED NINETEEN mph and widened for 14 to 16 open-section-style sleeper berths plus a kind of bedroom for two.  Gets rid of much of the problem with transfers ... and some of the weather and safety issues, too...

https://simanaitissays.files.wordpress.com/2019/04/sleeper36.jpg?w=547&h=760

https://simanaitissays.files.wordpress.com/2019/04/dc114.jpg

https://simanaitissays.files.wordpress.com/2019/04/berthsclosed.jpg?w=547&h=743

 

My mother's eldest sister was the deputy editor of "The Australian Women's Weekly". During the 1970s she told me that she had been invited on an inaugural New York-Los Angeles flight on a Douglas Sleeper Transport (possibly with American Airlines) in 1936. The aircraft was diverted to a small town in the mid-west due to bad weather and the passengers were transferred to a local hotel, still in their nightwear. She was still quite upset about this more than thirty years later, since many of the local residents came out to view the event. I think she went to the Coronation in 1953.

While on the subject of sleeping (or trying to) on aircraft the last Australian 747 departed for storage in Victorville today. For the users of "Flight Radar 24" the aircraft traced out the QANTAS kangaroo logo with its flight path just off the Australian coast. The aircraft is probably still in the air and this logo might still be viewable by users of the site. the flight number is QF7474, registration VH-OEJ. I have slept (or not) on many 747s in all three classes and first class, even when they were sill just seats, is quite acceptable.

Peter

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Posted by Jones1945 on Wednesday, July 22, 2020 8:38 AM

Miningman

Tuesday July 21 Photo OTD

 

Once upon a time the Southern Pacific was a big deal railroad, dubbed by Trains as the "New Standard of Railroading".  Their colour scheme of their passenger fleets honoured the bright sunny days and the boundless optimism of California. 

I love how they extended the white stripe to the pilot; other RRs would just ignore things like this. Every little detail counts, every little choice of our life can make a huge difference. The interior color of the Shasta Club looks dated, but at least it was roomy and comfortable. 

 

Overmod

Illustrated (and zoomable!) map of the original T.A.T. route

https://www.davidrumsey.com/luna/servlet/detail/RUMSEY~8~1~2208~190076:Illustrated-Map-of-the-Route-of-Tra

Thanks for the map, Overmod. The whole journey would take 44 hours by road nowadays (skipping St.Louis and Kansas City), the shortest route between New York and Los Angeles takes "only" 41 hours. I am too old for a road trip like this. I wonder what was the consist of the short-lived PRR "The Airway Limited".

PRR THE AIRWAY LIMITED:

Est. 7/7/1929 as advance section of THE AMERICAN; 1st #65;

New York-Port Columbus as part of air-rail service to Los Angeles; eastbound planes connect with THE AMERICAN without any special designation as AIRWAY LIMITED; operated as separate train #55 4/27/1930- 9/28/1930 one hour earlier than #65 a/c Daylight Saving Time; last trip 2/16/1932 due to sudden "temporary" discontinuance of connecting Flight #5 by T&WA. 

Flintlock76

...And if you didn't have to be in Chicago yesterday there were other trains like the "Erie Limited."  Certainly not the "Century," but it was a comfortable ride with good amenities and a fine diner. 

Oh well, what are you gonna do?  Times change, some (most) times for the better, sometimes not...

I almost completely forget the "Erie Limited" and those handsome Erie K class Pacific! 

  

K5b

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Posted by Flintlock76 on Wednesday, July 22, 2020 11:21 AM

Hey!  Mr. Jones is back!  Cool!

Several things.  OK, the "Shasta Club" may look dated, but to me that's part of the charm.  It'd be enjoyable indeed to sit in something like that in a perfect state of preservation, kind of like having a meal in a perfectly preserved post-war American diner.

Oh yeah, those Erie heavy Pacifics.  The Erie never saw the need to upgrade to a Hudson type for passenger service, those big K's were more than adequate. 

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Posted by Miningman on Thursday, July 23, 2020 11:01 AM

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