Other views of NY City

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Other views of NY City
Posted by Miningman on Sunday, May 10, 2020 2:23 PM

After posting those views of the West Side Highway Mike sent me some various other views of NY City . 


Commodore Vanderbilt ....you have to zoom in on the old guy, below the clock 

 

Pennsylvania Station from the Empire State Building 102nd floor
 
 Gimbel's 32nd St. bridge from Penn Station
 

 

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Posted by Miningman on Sunday, May 10, 2020 9:25 PM


Penn Station 

 
 
 
 
 
 
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Posted by Flintlock76 on Monday, May 11, 2020 10:04 AM

Fascinating watching the evolution of the area around Penn Station, isn't it?  

Thanks for the shots!

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Posted by Miningman on Monday, May 11, 2020 12:40 PM

Yeah the station itself looks so new and shines,,,, because it is new! Wouldn't it be something to have a look around inside then. 

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Posted by Overmod on Monday, May 11, 2020 2:47 PM

Flintlock76
Fascinating watching the evolution of the area around Penn Station, isn't it?

Hard to believe it's been down longer than it was ever up...

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Posted by Miningman on Monday, May 11, 2020 2:48 PM
"Penn Station" by Miguel Covarrubias (1904-1957)
 
P.R.R. Station in New York Has Fluorescent American Flag 

A 60-ft. fluorescent American flag now adorns the area between the main waiting room and the train concourse of New York's dimmed-out Pennsylvania station in New York. The flag was suggested by Raymond Loewy, industrial designer and consultant to the Pennsylvania. In order to activate the fluorescent-impregnated material, 12 concealed sources of invisible “black" light have been mounted on the ledges on opposite sides of the area where the flag is hung.The flag, which weighs 200 lb., is visible as far away as the Seventh Avenue entrance to the station. The flag lighted in this manner is highly effective in getting attention in the extreme dimmed-out conditions which now prevail in this great and bustling terminal. Few theaters which strive for striking effects by use of lights have ever achieved anything more dramatic than this Penn Station display. 

 

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Posted by Flintlock76 on Monday, May 11, 2020 7:08 PM

Wow!  A sixty-foot fluorescent  American flag!  This is the first I've heard of it!  Magnificent!  I wonder whatever happened to it?  

Do I detect the fine hand of Wanswheel here, sending his finds to us from wildest Farmingdale?

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Posted by Miningman on Monday, May 11, 2020 7:53 PM

Dang, would have made a good quiz question! 

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Posted by Jones1945 on Wednesday, May 13, 2020 10:31 AM

 

Gil Scott-Heron - New York Is Killing Me (Chris Cunningham Visual Remix)

 

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Posted by Flintlock76 on Wednesday, May 13, 2020 11:48 AM

Jeez Mr. Jones, that was kind of, uh, grim.  

How about something more upbeat, like this?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=x7CIgWZTdgw  

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Posted by Miningman on Wednesday, May 13, 2020 12:15 PM

Jones-- Have to agree with Wayne on that one.  I mean, someone actually laid out time and money to produce that?  ... and then what? 

 

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Posted by Deggesty on Wednesday, May 13, 2020 1:51 PM

Thanks, Wayne--I was, indeed, in the mood for that! 

Johnny

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Posted by Miningman on Wednesday, May 13, 2020 11:44 PM
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Posted by Jones1945 on Thursday, May 14, 2020 10:43 AM

Flintlock76

Jeez Mr. Jones, that was kind of, uh, grim.  

How about something more upbeat, like this?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=x7CIgWZTdgw   

Yeah! As grim as the reality, as dark as the far side of the moon. We usually focus on the bright side of the Big Apple, but how about the dark side?

Miningman

Jones-- Have to agree with Wayne on that one.  I mean, someone actually laid out time and money to produce that?  ... and then what? 

To show people the other views/sides of NY City? Wink

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Posted by Flintlock76 on Thursday, May 14, 2020 6:53 PM

"Protesting the gasolene dinky."  So that's what those gas masks are all about!

I was thinking that instead of cutting the cards someone was cutting the cheese! 

Love that Mets and Rheingold memorabilia Mike sent us from the wilds of Farmingdale.  Man, does that bring it all back!  Poor old Rheingold, as a New Jersey bar owner put it not too long ago, "Rheingold?  No, they don't make it anymore right now."  Too bad, it was good beer!

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Posted by Flintlock76 on Saturday, May 23, 2020 9:45 AM

Interesting stuff!

Greeley Square looks a lot better now than it did "way back when."  At least ol' Horace has some nice landscaping around him instead of just being plopped in the middle of the street.

That last photo with the head-on shot!  Wow!  That says it all, doesn't it?  The glory of steam personified!  

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Posted by Miningman on Saturday, May 23, 2020 11:59 AM

Absolutely Flintlock/Wayne! That photo is exactly the way the CNR 6400's barrelled thru the station in Burlington, Ontario when I was a kid. It was the most exciting thing I ever saw. 

 

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Posted by Flintlock76 on Saturday, May 23, 2020 3:33 PM

That old map had me tearing my hair out trying to figure out what's what, considering the placement of Spuyten Duyvil Creek and the Harlem River.  There must have been some hellacious landfilling and landforming from the time that map was done and now.  It's nothing like that today!  

At least I found the compass rose orientation arrow, but that didn't help much. 

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Posted by Overmod on Saturday, May 23, 2020 4:01 PM

Flintlock76
That old map had me tearing my hair out trying to figure out what's what, considering the placement of Spuyten Duyvil Creek and the Harlem River.  There must have been some hellacious landfilling and landforming from the time that map was done and now.  It's nothing like that today!

Shame on you, Wayne!  Read the history of Marble Hill for all the details of the great realignment (which, in part, led to the sharp transition curve in cut that facilitated the asleep-at-the-throttle MN wreck a few years ago)

A far better question, imho, is what that steam power was doing on the inside track in the first place.  Has to be one of the last trains handled to/from Mott Haven or perhaps GCT itself before the full electrification was turned on (see the third rail already in place with its shieldboards?)  As such it might represent the cutting edge of NYC passenger power, one of the earliest Pacifics (the cylinders seem too large to be something else) that would have been supplanting the then-first-line Atlantics... can anyone deconvolve the locomotive number?

(Here's the steamlocomotive.com page for NYC Atlantics, including their number series, from which you can easily find the Pacifics too.)

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Posted by Flintlock76 on Saturday, May 23, 2020 5:10 PM

Shame on me Mod-Man?  Why would I care what goes on in the City?  I'm from Jersey!  As long as they don't ruin the good stuff like the Empire State Building (A national landmark, it's where King Kong died,) the Chrysler Building, Radio City, well you get the picture.  

And who cares what that steam engine's doing on the inside track?  Just like Mount Everest, it's there!   Nothing else matters.

But I will  read up on Marble Hill, just to find out "what the hell?"  

Speaking of upper Manhattan, Kingsbridge and such, want to see what it looked like in the flintlock era?  

http://www.battlefields.org/learn/maps/fort-washington-november-16-1776  

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Posted by Miningman on Saturday, May 23, 2020 5:22 PM

The loco coming right at ya on Track 2 reads 3425/6 but then I'm not all that certain or good at that stuff. The loco in question on the inside seems to be 342x.  

Not sure why he's on the inside track either, but there are no people on the platform at all so maybe they closed that part off for access for a while as trains were diverted onto that track. 

When those 6400's came thundering through the Burlington of my yoots, they were always on the far outside track as the platforms had many folk waiting on 'scheduled stop' trains. However!..there was a small platform on that far side as well but they served only one train a day, in the am, going all the way up to Allendale, almost always a doddlebug. Folks were not permitted to cross the myriad of tracks in Burlington at that time, there was a posted sign and at train time they were escorted across along a wooden plank walkway. Did not have that nice pedestrian overhead as at Kingsbridge Station.

One of the Classic Trains Photo of the Day pics had a 'pinch hitting Pacific in Burlington' substituting for the doddlebug that day, very very near the discontinuance of the train itself.  We kids called it 'the ghost line' as so few trains. The line went along the Niagara Escarpment past Mt Nemo and thru incredibly beautiful rural rustic countryside. In later years it became a big deal, extensively rebuilt and double tracked with most of the traffic from the North and West routed that way. I believe it's called the Halton Sub these days. 

Anyways , back to Kingsbridge!

This is the station in the 2 steam photos, without the footbridge, which may be nearby, providing access to the IRT station.
Same tiny station, if you can spot it, to the right of the Broadway Bridge and to the left of the billboards. 
 
 
The Broadway Bridge
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Posted by Flintlock76 on Saturday, May 23, 2020 7:40 PM

Look at that bridge!  No-BS steel and masonry!  Built for the ages and not just a few decades!  

We should stand in awe of the people who built things like that!

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Posted by MidlandMike on Saturday, May 23, 2020 11:18 PM

I was thrown off by "Kingsbridge Station".  I eventually realized it was Marble Hill Station.  There was a Kingsbridge Station on the Putnam Division a little bit to the nortn and east.  Also the upper level on the Broadway swing bridge is a subway line.  That bridge has been replaced with a vertical lift bridge, still with subway.

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Posted by Miningman on Sunday, May 24, 2020 2:13 AM

 

The Marble Hill station that had been the Kingsbridge station.
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Posted by Miningman on Sunday, May 24, 2020 1:29 PM

 Kingsbridge to Marble Hill



 

 

 
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Posted by Flintlock76 on Sunday, May 24, 2020 3:19 PM

Interesting open letter to Mr. Smith.

An even more interesting photo of  Mr. Smith.

Is it just me, or does he look like he could give a ***?  

I'll tell you what though, today's "PC" world would give the folks who put together that "Valentine's Guide"  a nervous breakdown!  

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FoNSFFhyEi8  

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Posted by Overmod on Sunday, May 24, 2020 3:30 PM

Flintlock76
Is it just me, or does he look like he could give a ***?  

Smith most definitely could; in my opinion he is one of the best and wisest people in the contemporary railroad world.  His solution for the problem of overbuilt Canadian railways was probably far better than the nationalization that was committed (and Thornton probably more effective several times over in it).  He is also responsible for setting in motion the program that led to Selkirk and the Castleton Cutoff.

He was killed young, trying to be chivalrous as I think was his nature; imagine what impressive things the Central would have achieved had he lived longer.

Try this image as a bit of a balance for the period in question:

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