Warren S. Stone

544 views
8 replies
1 rating 2 rating 3 rating 4 rating 5 rating
  • Member since
    September 2013
  • 6,199 posts
Warren S. Stone
Posted by Miningman on Monday, April 20, 2020 12:55 AM
 Mike asked me to,post this great find:.
 
There was a building at the corner of 7th Ave. & 34th St., on the right in this picture, which caused me to learn who Warren S. Stone was.
 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Locomotive Engineers Journal, January 1924
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 
  • Member since
    January 2019
  • From: Henrico, VA
  • 5,073 posts
Posted by Flintlock76 on Monday, April 20, 2020 5:36 PM

That's a very impressive building the BLE had in Cleveland!  I wonder if it's still there?

We need "Penny Trains" to sound off on this one.  If there's something about Cleveland she doesn't know about it probably never happened to begin with!

  • Member since
    September 2010
  • From: Parma Heights Ohio
  • 3,442 posts
Posted by Penny Trains on Monday, April 20, 2020 8:48 PM

Uh, there were 2 of them actually.  The BLE building is gone:

There was a courtyard on the opposite side that looked like the all but identical bank accross the street:

The bank is now known as the "Standard Building" and is an apartment complex:

https://www.thestandardcle.com/

 

Trains, trains, wonderful trains.  The more you get, the more you toot!  Big Smile

  • Member since
    January 2019
  • From: Henrico, VA
  • 5,073 posts
Posted by Flintlock76 on Monday, April 20, 2020 9:22 PM

Wow!  Those interiors!  Like an opera house!

Thanks Becky!  I knew you'd know!

  • Member since
    September 2013
  • 6,199 posts
Posted by Miningman on Monday, April 20, 2020 10:05 PM

Building sold by the BLE and new one purchased in suburb 

Mike says he can hear his grandfathers voice talking about Brother Stone with all these pics. 

  • Member since
    September 2013
  • 6,199 posts
Posted by Miningman on Tuesday, April 21, 2020 1:23 PM

Million Dollar Profit 

 
 
 
 
  • Member since
    September 2010
  • From: Parma Heights Ohio
  • 3,442 posts
Posted by Penny Trains on Tuesday, April 21, 2020 8:24 PM

Flintlock76
Wow! Those interiors! Like an opera house!

This one was lost:

The new buiding is nice...

This photo is from the real-estate listing prior to the union buying the site.

Trains, trains, wonderful trains.  The more you get, the more you toot!  Big Smile

  • Member since
    September 2013
  • 6,199 posts
Posted by Miningman on Wednesday, April 22, 2020 2:14 PM
 
Roy Harvey (1892–1958) loved railroading and worked for the Virginian for years. A loyal member of the Brotherhood of Locomotive Engineers, he walked off his job when the union struck in 1923. His family moved from Princeton to Beckley, West Virginia, and he worked as a salesman in the Beckley Music Store, gradually becoming interested in phonograph records. Between 1926 and 1930 he made numerous recordings, mainly with Charlie Poole’s very popular string band, the North Carolina Ramblers. Harvey’s song about the strike reflects bitter disillusionment with the union. Like many railroad men, he felt the union had misled them in the causes for the strike. Harvey wrote and recorded his song in the hopes that it would win him his job back, but it didn’t work. In 1942 he moved to Florida and took a job with the Florida East Coast Railway, where he remained until his death. (American Folk Songs by Norman  Cohen) 
The Virginian Strike of '23
 
In the dear old town of Princeton in the year of ’twenty-three, 
Five hundred railroad employees were as happy as can be; 
Enjoying the highest prosperity, and nothing to worry them at all, 
But they believed in Satan and quit their jobs that fall. 
 
They were told from every corner and given good advice, 
But they would not listen, and now they’ve paid the price; 
They’ve roamed to every country, a-waiting for a call, 
To report at the Princeton roundhouse, and they’ve waited six years this fall. 
 
The trains are moving nicely, from Princeton, east and west, 
With men of good ability, while the poor boys take their rest; 
Their homes will ever be silent to the call boy’s daily call, 
Unless the Virginian Railroad will call them back this fall. 
 
I was one among the number that made the sad mistake, 
And left my good old railroad job, my engine did forsake; 
And now I’m sure downhearted, for I have no job at all, 
But I’d like to run an engine on the Virginian again this fall.

 
 

 

SUBSCRIBER & MEMBER LOGIN

Login, or register today to interact in our online community, comment on articles, receive our newsletter, manage your account online and more!

FREE NEWSLETTER SIGNUP

Get the Classic Trains twice-monthly newsletter