Fateful Trip , passengers of Destiny.

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Posted by Flintlock76 on Sunday, June 28, 2020 10:09 AM

Deggesty

 

 
Flintlock76

Crewe in England.  Interesting.  There's a Crewe here in Virginia, and it's a crew change point on the Norfolk-Southern line to Danville.  

Crewe must be a good name for railroad towns!

 

 

 

Wayne, Crewe is on what was the N&W's main line; you go west from there, and you go through Farmville; you go east, and you go by Petersburg. what have you been drinking?Big Smile

 

 

Well last night only Coca-Cola, you know, "Southern Holy Water?"

I just dug out my ancient old (1991) Virginia railfan book and you're absolutely right Johnny, Crewe is on the old N&W (now NS) mainline from Norfolk to Roanoke. However the book does call it a "crewe" change point. 

If you work for NS and you're part of the crewe I guess that's what you dew.

Wayne

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Posted by CSSHEGEWISCH on Sunday, June 28, 2020 10:15 AM

Are you sure that it wasn't Mexican holy water from Jalisco state?

The daily commute is part of everyday life but I get two rides a day out of it. Paul
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Posted by Overmod on Sunday, June 28, 2020 11:09 AM

Miningman
I just knew this would start a riot. 

No, that was Heuston.  At least it got a rise out of you.

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Posted by York1 on Sunday, June 28, 2020 11:29 AM

And if it's around Fat Tuesday, you can be a member of a 'Krewe'.

York1 John       

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Posted by Flintlock76 on Sunday, June 28, 2020 12:52 PM

CSSHEGEWISCH

Are you sure that it wasn't Mexican holy water from Jalisco state?

 

I'm sure.  Definately from Hot-Lanta!

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Posted by Overmod on Sunday, June 28, 2020 4:34 PM

CSSHEGEWISCH
Are you sure that it wasn't Mexican holy water from Jalisco state?

They do that differently now.

 

https://www.cbs17.com/news/check-this-out/priest-goes-viral-after-picture-shows-him-using-squirt-gun-filled-with-holy-water/

We are starting to confuse 'holy water' with 'water of life' with 'divine elixir'.  That's gonna get us in trouble.

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Posted by M636C on Monday, June 29, 2020 9:18 PM

 
Assuming this is Crewe (the one in Cheshire), It didn't look much like that when I las visited in 2013. I had also passed through Crewe at night in 1997 when I last travelled to Dublin by rail and ferry. That was also my last visit to Dublin Heuston.
I invite anyone to look at the aerial photo in google maps of the present Crewe station. Where the brick retaining wall stands in this photo, there are now six electrified main line tracks, two of which join the North Wales Coast line on the level and four of which tunnel under the junction, two each joining the line to Manchester and the West Coast main line. These bypass tracks are only for freight trains, since the non stopping passenger trains (all on the West coast) just run though on centre tracks away from the platforms. These are used by the Pendolinos. I tried to photograph these and the best technique is to set the camera on fast sequence mode and hope that one of the shots has the train in the right place.
Anyway assuming this is Crewe, the train is entering from the north on the West Coast Main Line, and the gantry only applies to that line. There would have been similar gantries on both of the diverging routes. These would have been contolled by Crewe Station "A" box which is currently preserved in it original location inside the Crewe Rail Heritage Centre, formerly part of Crewe Workshops (which would be behind the photographer on the right).
The carriage could be an LMS carriage of the type called "Period I" based on Midland Railway designs. For this to be true, the rectangular area above the windows would be a "Stones Ventilator" which consists of vertically hinged glass louvres, half each oriented foward and aft. I can't see how these would reproduce as a flat sheet, as they appear to do in this photo. This type of carriage had paired windows, one of which was a droplight. This does seem to be the case. On this car the photographer is leaning out of one of the droplights, and one ahead of him is also open. I assume this photo was taken during summer.
The windows of the Pendolinos are not as large and definitely don't open.
Peter
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Posted by daveklepper on Wednesday, July 1, 2020 2:45 AM

Haven't we established that it is Dublin-Heuston and not Crewe?  Or did I miss  somthingt

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Posted by scilover on Wednesday, July 1, 2020 3:41 AM
Oh wow, amazing pictures! He invented the first selfie while taking a haircut hahaha. What year was this?
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Posted by daveklepper on Wednesday, July 1, 2020 4:04 AM

The Leica M3 shown in the selfie and regularly used by Father Frank Browne, SJ, was introduced by Leitz in 1954, and is the camera I regularly use.

Father Frank Browne, SJ, past on in 1960 at age 80.

I've been cutting my own hair.  When the Coronavirus threat is ended, and I pay to have a haircut, should I take a selfie with my Leice M3 and have it posted?

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Posted by Flintlock76 on Wednesday, July 1, 2020 9:32 AM

Why ever not?  There's certainly historic precedent for it!

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Posted by daveklepper on Sunday, July 5, 2020 8:37 AM

OK   Will do.    May have to wait a while.

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Posted by M636C on Wednesday, July 8, 2020 8:20 PM

daveklepper

Haven't we established that it is Dublin-Heuston and not Crewe?  Or did I miss  somthingt

 

Firstly, I should apologise for taking so long to answer this. I am having an apartment renovated, and I have been tied up with contractors for much of my time.

I have been as confused as anybody.

However, when I looked at an enlargement of the photo in question, there was an overhead bridge over the station just at the (North) end of the overall roof. Having checked as much as I could, I haven't found any evidence of an overhead bridge at Dublin Heuston station at any time.

Also, in the enlargement it became clear that there was no road behind the retaining wall to the right of the photo.

So, on reflection, despite the view looking nothing like Crewe today, it seems likely that the photo was indeed Crewe. There are other relevant comments in my earlier post.

Peter

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