Fateful Trip , passengers of Destiny.

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Posted by Penny Trains on Thursday, April 16, 2020 8:41 PM

Flintlock76
I wonder if it was pushed or towed?

I would guess pushed based on the seating, but pushed by what?  Compared with the buffer height of the cars around it, and the lack of them on the car in question, I would doubt a locomotive would have been used.  Can we date it?  Maybe a small gas engine speeder could push or pull it?

Trains, trains, wonderful trains.  The more you get, the more you toot!  Big Smile

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Posted by Flintlock76 on Thursday, April 16, 2020 9:21 PM

I'm still puzzling over that inspection car.  Maybe there's a small gasolene engine in there some place where we can't see it?

Since this is Ireland it definately wouldn't be used as a hot-dog stand.  Maybe a fish n' chips stand?  Wink

It's a beautiful thing, at any rate!

A sad irony to that piece by Elbert Hubbard, "The Titanic."  Hubbard himself was lost three years later in the sinking of the Lusitania.   

Quite a popular writer in his time, Elber Hubbard was also the author of "A Message To Garcia."  

Timeless words o' wisdom, and here it is.

http://babel.hathitrust.org/cgi/pt?id=uc1.31822042776955&view=1up&seq=1  

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Posted by Miningman on Thursday, April 16, 2020 10:15 PM

NDG
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Posted by NDG on Thursday, April 16, 2020 10:49 PM

 

 

Is that a crank by the man's left knee.  Has headlight.

 

Thank You.

 

 

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Posted by Overmod on Friday, April 17, 2020 12:10 AM

See the Railway Times, Feb 24 1906?

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Posted by daveklepper on Friday, April 17, 2020 2:25 AM

Miningman, this was also the Cantor that charted a special PRR train, I think Jersey City - Baltimore, that set the speed record on the NEC up to the time of the Lindberg newsreel special, both with E-6 Atlantics, both in the Westing - Kalmbach book Apex of the Atlantics, so he could give an evening concert in both New York City and Baltimore.  I do not have the Westing book at hand at the moment and someone may wish to check the exact facts,

Also, one of the important people in the history of public medicine in Israel was Nathan Strauss (after whom Netanya was named). He was due to sail on the Titanic, with his brother Isidore and
sister-in-law, but was delayed and missed the boat. Isidore and his wife
perished, and Nathan saw that as a Divine sign that he had been saved for a
purpose. He therefore devoted most of his time and money to Public Health.
Anyhow, here is a You Tube of Yossele.
https://youtu.be/JEpadnRY4CU

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Posted by daveklepper on Friday, April 17, 2020 2:40 AM

There is also an important, but narrow, street in Jerusalem named for Nathan Strauss, used by the 22, 25, 34, 35, and 45 bus lines for all or most of its length, and 71-75, and the 19A in one direction, for one block, making it the very most congested street in Jerusalem.  Nothing but taxis and buses during rush hours and mid-day.  Was even more congested before the light rail opened.

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Posted by Flintlock76 on Friday, April 17, 2020 10:37 AM

NDG, I think you nailed it and solved the mystery, there must be a gasolene engine in there.

Well done!

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Posted by Flintlock76 on Friday, April 17, 2020 10:41 AM

Great YouTube clip David!

When the Titanic  sank Tin Pan Alley went into overdrive putting out memorial songs, most (if not all) pretty forgettable, but Cantor Rosenblatt's tribute is just beautiful!  I don't understand a word he's singing, but I don't have to, and that says something.   What a beautiful voice he had!

I looked up Nathan Straus.  What a man, he did an awful lot of good!

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nathan_Straus  

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Posted by daveklepper on Sunday, April 19, 2020 1:31 PM

Here is another of my favorite Father Frank Browne S. J. pictures.   Probably Peter can supply details:

 

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Posted by Deggesty on Sunday, April 19, 2020 2:13 PM

daveklepper

Here is another of my favorite Father Frank Browne S. J. pictures.   Poddibly Peter can supply details:

 

 

As I look at the one on the right, I get the impression, from the smoke box doors, that it was very old when the picture was taken.

Also, looking at what coupling/uncoupling entailed I wonder: did those who did the work duck under or climb/leap over the buffers?

Johnny

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Posted by Overmod on Sunday, April 19, 2020 3:58 PM

Deggesty
Also, looking at what coupling/uncoupling entailed I wonder: did those who did the work duck under or climb/leap over the buffers?

In many of the movies on British practice, I see them scrambling underneath (in part facilitated by having to tinker with the brake pipes too).

In passenger work in Germany/Austria and Switzerland, in the mid-Seventies, I remember them generally reaching over and down, never getting to where an inadvertent car movement would find any part of their body 'cuttable' by wheel contact...

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Posted by Flintlock76 on Sunday, April 19, 2020 4:33 PM

daveklepper

Here is another of my favorite Father Frank Browne S. J. pictures.   Poddibly Peter can supply details:

 

 

The one on the right looks like a childs storybook engine, doesn't it?

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Posted by MidlandMike on Sunday, April 19, 2020 10:24 PM

It appears the smokebox has double-doors.

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Posted by M636C on Monday, April 20, 2020 4:38 AM

daveklepper

Here is another of my favorite Father Frank Browne S. J. pictures.   Probably Peter can supply details:

 

 

I've been a bit slow getting to this....

The locomotive on the left is GSR 461, an inside cylinder 2-6-0 built for the Dublin and South Eastern Railway by Beyer Peacock in 1922. This locomotive is now preserved by the Railway Preservation Society of Ireland. A summary of locomotive classes in 1948 described the two locomotives in the class as "One of the best Goods on the System". Inside cylinder 2-6-0s are unusual but are represented by "James" in the "Thomas the Tank Engine" books.

The locomotive on the right is a former Great Southern and Western Class 101 0-6-0 which dates back to 1867, and some of these were built by Beyer Peacock also. It appears to have been rebuilt with a 4'4" diameter boiler, but retains the original design of smokebox with a backward sloping front and two smokebox doors. The 1948 summary said: "The general purpose small Goods engine can work over most lines."

Peter

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Posted by daveklepper on Monday, April 20, 2020 5:56 AM

Thanks, Peter!

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Posted by daveklepper on Tuesday, April 21, 2020 4:30 AM

Who would like to discuss differences and similarities between classic Irish and North American interlodking installations?

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Posted by Overmod on Tuesday, April 21, 2020 9:09 AM

daveklepper
Who would like to discuss differences and similarities between classic Irish and North American interlocking installations?

I think a better place to start might be between British and American practice, followed by detail differences between contemporary British and American plants of this era.  This is not an area where I have more than 'reading' expertise, so will leave it to others with 'the Knowledge' and the proper enthusiasm.

It had not occurred to me that those little patent plates were actually pedals to assist returning the levers to locking position.

The term 'interlocking' itself refers to Saxby and Farmer-type arrangements, where only full combinations of route could be selected with the switch levers and others were 'locked out'.  This was invented just after the American Civil War, and (as usual, I supposed, where these things are concerned) there is some question about whether very early American interlocking practice was cribbed from the English or parallel-developed.  These things remain one of the great innovations of the Victorian era, really as technologically advanced in anything in security lock practice or even horology of that period; I have the same trouble trying to figure out how complex plants are 'programmed' as I do trying to reverse-engineer something like an IBM Composer to fix and adjust it without a manual.  In other words: lots.

Note the typically British electric line-occupancy indicator, about which there are many discussions online -- both in its principles and in its practical use.  I believe the inimitable Robinson developed devices like this in America, by the 1870s, but they had comparatively little early use (you would not believe some of the relevant battery chemistries!) I think in part due to the relatively late invention of the dynamo as a practical source of DC power at the required combination of voltage and amperage to make electrical signaling fully 'practical'.

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Posted by daveklepper on Friday, June 26, 2020 4:15 AM

Seem to have lost the caption.  Where is this signal bridge?

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Posted by Flintlock76 on Friday, June 26, 2020 8:17 AM

I don't know myself, but wow, it looks like a signal bridge on steroids!

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Posted by Penny Trains on Friday, June 26, 2020 7:36 PM

Aye chihuahua!  Tongue Tied  I pity the operator! 

Trains, trains, wonderful trains.  The more you get, the more you toot!  Big Smile

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Posted by Overmod on Friday, June 26, 2020 11:52 PM

I was waiting for people more familiar with UK practice to flag the location -- I'd lay money on Peter Clark knowing not only the railroad and place but the era down to a few years' spread, the type of equipment, etc.

For some reason this makes me think of Reading.  (the one in England).

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Posted by M636C on Saturday, June 27, 2020 6:36 AM

Overmod

I was waiting for people more familiar with UK practice to flag the location -- I'd lay money on Peter Clark knowing not only the railroad and place but the era down to a few years' spread, the type of equipment, etc.

For some reason this makes me think of Reading.  (the one in England).

 

I think that view is approaching Dublin Heuston (orignally called Kingsbridge).

The elevated roadway on the right and the general track layout looks right.

The carriage doesn't look like one of any of the major British railways. In fact, it looks like a vehicle belonging to the Great Northern Railway of Ireland. A number of vehicles with that style of panelling and flat or nearly flat sides were built during the very early years of the 20th Century. These had small raised class indicator plates just above the windows in the doors and these appear in the photo.

Against this is the fact that GNR(I) trains normally terminated at Dublin Connolly north of the river but there were connecting lines and through trains were run as far as Cork.

But that's the best I can do.

Peter

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Posted by Miningman on Saturday, June 27, 2020 7:31 PM

It's been found!

 

Posted by daveklepper on Friday, June 26, 2020 4:15 AM 

Seem to have lost the caption.  Where is this signal bridge?

Crewe Gantry, 1930  http://www.fatherbrowne.com/

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Crewe

 

 

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Posted by Flintlock76 on Saturday, June 27, 2020 9:34 PM

Crewe in England.  Interesting.  There's a Crewe here in Virginia, and it's a crew change point on the Norfolk-Southern line to Danville.  

Crewe must be a good name for railroad towns!

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Posted by Overmod on Sunday, June 28, 2020 3:04 AM

But is that gantry in the part of Crewe that is not Crewe, or is in in the not-Crewe that is Crewe?

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Posted by Miningman on Sunday, June 28, 2020 3:17 AM

I just knew this would start a riot. 

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Posted by daveklepper on Sunday, June 28, 2020 5:13 AM

Glad to use the Dublin-Heuston caotion, and thank you!

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Posted by Deggesty on Sunday, June 28, 2020 8:02 AM

Flintlock76

Crewe in England.  Interesting.  There's a Crewe here in Virginia, and it's a crew change point on the Norfolk-Southern line to Danville.  

Crewe must be a good name for railroad towns!

 

Wayne, Crewe is on what was the N&W's main line; you go west from there, and you go through Farmville; you go east, and you go by Petersburg. what have you been drinking?Big Smile

Johnny

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