Fateful Trip , passengers of Destiny.

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Posted by daveklepper on Sunday, April 12, 2020 9:18 AM

When I first posted the Enterprise photo, I noticed a small tear in the upper right corner that was disfiguring.  With lack of time, I '''corrrected" by cropping the top a tiny  bit.  I've gone back and repaired the tear on the original and corrected the first posting and repeating that here.  Peter may wish to use the corrected correction also.

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Posted by Flintlock76 on Sunday, April 12, 2020 11:48 AM

Nice cropping job David!

It's also pretty apparant that Father Browne wasn't bothered by trackside poles or overhead wires, the things that used to drive American railfan photographers nuts.

In the American rail scene today those poles and wires are as much a part of the past as steam engines themselves.  

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Posted by Penny Trains on Sunday, April 12, 2020 6:42 PM

That photo conjures up a lot of impressions.  A warm summer day.  The countryside.  Lazy clouds.  Just bowling along as fast or as slow as steam wants to carry you.

Trains, trains, wonderful trains.  The more you get, the more you toot!  Big Smile

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Posted by MidlandMike on Sunday, April 12, 2020 11:00 PM

Flintlock76
It's also pretty apparant that Father Browne wasn't bothered by trackside poles or overhead wires...

Those poles with so many cross arms is the second most interesting subject in the photo.

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Posted by daveklepper on Monday, April 13, 2020 10:45 AM

Here is a mosr unusual picture, and I will leave it to Peter to tell us all about it:

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Posted by Flintlock76 on Monday, April 13, 2020 11:02 AM

That is  unusual.  I magnified the picture until I started losing resolution and I'm not sure what that structure is.  It's either a bridge built like nobodys business or a run-through engine servicing facility.

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Posted by daveklepper on Monday, April 13, 2020 1:34 PM

A covered bridge

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Posted by Overmod on Monday, April 13, 2020 6:10 PM

daveklepper
... a most unusual picture, and I will leave it to Peter to tell us all about it:

Reminded me rather promptly of this:

One of the more spectacular ideas in early railroad engineering ... until you have to run locomotives that don't "consume their own smoke".  Then the tubes get progressively latticed out...

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Posted by Flintlock76 on Monday, April 13, 2020 6:40 PM

A covered bridge!  I'll bet it's still there!

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Posted by M636C on Monday, April 13, 2020 9:32 PM

daveklepper

Here is a most unusual picture, and I will leave it to Peter to tell us all about it:

 

 

The Boyne Viaduct:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Boyne_Viaduct

Years ago I was travelling on a Eurailpass which didn't apply in Northern Ireland so I got off The Enterprise in Drogheda and caught the next train back. It was a cold wet winter day but I could see the bridge from the station.

Peter

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Posted by daveklepper on Monday, April 13, 2020 10:02 PM

Thanks!   And a recent posting  on the Brooklyn Elevated thread refers to the Titanic -  Ciry of New York (the ship) "confrontation" at Souhhampton.

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Posted by Miningman on Tuesday, April 14, 2020 1:59 AM


SS New York and the Titanic 

 
 
 
 
 
 
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Posted by Miningman on Tuesday, April 14, 2020 11:46 AM
Okay, I got Bab-O, they deliver.
 
Happy Titanic Day 
 
 
( when I was a kid we ended that song like this. " Kerplunk, it sunk, too bad, so sad" 
I'm sure there are other versions) 

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Posted by Flintlock76 on Tuesday, April 14, 2020 1:28 PM

"It Was Sad When That Great Ship Went Down."

I detect the fine hand of Mike again!

Strange, but no-one has any idea of who wrote that Titanic  song, it just seemed to appear out of nowhere within weeks of the disaster.  Children were heard singing it on the streets, and the reaction was "How did kids come up with something like that?"  

Kind of like " The Worms Crawl In, The Worms Crawl Out" song, but we should save that one for Halloween!  

Oh, and the liner Teutonic  mentioned in Lawrence Beesley's account of the near collision?  That's the ship John Phillip Sousa was returning from Europe on when he composed "The Stars And Stripes Forever!"   Sousa said the march just popped into his head, he set it to paper, and never changed a note afterward.

But we'll save that one for Independence Day!

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Posted by Miningman on Tuesday, April 14, 2020 8:06 PM
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Posted by Flintlock76 on Tuesday, April 14, 2020 9:59 PM

"Down With The Old Canoe."  I've heard of it, but never heard it before.

Thanks Vince!

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Posted by Flintlock76 on Wednesday, April 15, 2020 10:57 AM

April 14-15, 1912.  "A Night To Remember."   108 years ago. 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Kq_MDc35pWg  

And RIP, Honor Blackman.  

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Posted by daveklepper on Wednesday, April 15, 2020 5:56 PM

Unsolicited, Steve Sattler sent me a message on the Jewish angle

of the Titanic disaster, which may be of interest to most readers of

this thread.  I've excerpted what may be most interesting, and

those wishing the complete message can contact Steve at

sattler31@gmail.com.

From 1880 -1920, some 3 mill. Russian Jews fled the Russian region,

so it is  not surprising that there were many Jews on the Titanic, most

of them in steerage. The Titanic set sail after Pesach 1912. The Hebrew

Immigration Aid Society  records show that only 27 Jews/ board survived,

all of whom were  taken from the rescue ships to a  Sheltering Home in NY.

The NY Jewish community viewed the sinking of the Titanic as a great

tragedy, & hundreds/ American synagogues held services in memory/ victims.

Songwriters wrote original pieces honoring the dead; among them was

Yiddish lyricist Solomon Small, who wrote Der Nasser Kever (“The Watery

Grave”). The famous Cantor Yossele Rosenblatt, who recorded  El Malei

Rachamim in memory of the  lost - donated the $150,000 -sales of the

album to help support the survivors.

THE TITANIC DISASTER:- "The survivors say that it was common

to inform the passengers that the poor  could be considered lost while

the first rescue boat filled with people from those found close to her.

The screaming surrounded the entire ship, & the women & children raised

a howl: & then the captain appeared and said: "women and children first!" 

And what is worthy of note is that everyone inside the boat immediately

obeyed the order &, with no refusal,


Initially, the kosher dishes & utensils were old tableware salvaged specifically

for White Star kosher service but, after WWI, kosher tableware was specially

made to cater to the growing numbers of Jewish passengers. However, no

kosher dishes or cutlery have ever been recovered from the sinking of the 

Titanic, though a few pieces from the Olympic do exist. .

To date, no kosher-only menu specific to the Titanic has ever been found,

though the experts on the subject argue that they must surely have existed

because there do exist exceedingly rare copies of standard 1913 White Star

third-class menus that declare “Kosher Meat supplied & Cooked for Jewish

Passengers as desired.”


The final Titanic lunch menu, from April 14, 1912, was sold at auction

in 2015 for $88,000. The salvaged menu once belonged Abraham Lincoln Salomon (1868-1959), a Jewish passenger & stationery dealer who traveled

to Europe/ business trip accompanied by his daughter, though he alone

booked 1st-class passage to return to NY on the doomed vessel.

He ultimately escaped death by boarding the infamous Lifeboat No. 1

which, though it had a 40/ capacity, nonetheless took off from the sinking

ship carrying only 12 people, including 7 crewmen, who assuredly did not 

“go down with the ship.”

2018:- On August 23, a pocket watch that belonged to Sinai Kantor,

a Jewish Russian immigrant who died aboard the Titanic, & featured

Hebrew letters on its face & Moses holding the 10 Commandments on/

back, sold at auction for $57,500. His wife Miriam was one of the few

Jewish survivors.

 

Steve

 

 

 

 
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Posted by Overmod on Wednesday, April 15, 2020 6:26 PM

Is there some reason that over and over and over again we get these long posts that don't wrap correctly in the forum software and are fundamentally unreadable, even though of great length?

How hard can it be just to cut and paste the text unformatted in the window, enclosing what has been snipped from an e-mail or other communication using the quote function or quote tags?  I certainly can't recover a readable version by any means available to me, thanks to poor programming choices at Kalmbach that let me extend the window dramatically, but not the column of actual content visible in it...

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Posted by Miningman on Wednesday, April 15, 2020 6:42 PM

Many of Dave Klepper posts are frequently cut off along the right side.

My long post of Tues Apr 14 @ 1:59 am is entirely within and readable on both my iPad and iPhone . 

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Posted by Flintlock76 on Wednesday, April 15, 2020 7:11 PM

Very interesting read of the Jews on the Titanic.  Thanks David!

I've got a question.  Would the kosher dishes and utensils be specifically so marked?  The reason I'm asking is when the White Star Line purchased dishes, bowls, utensils, and so forth they bought them en masse  for the whole shipping line, with no specific markings other than "White Star Line."  

This has been a caveat emptor  for Titanic  fans for years.  The only thing on the  Titanic  that had the ship's name on it was the ship itself, the exception being ephemera like menus.   So if you see a teacup that has "RMS Titanic" on it, watch out!   

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Posted by Penny Trains on Wednesday, April 15, 2020 7:12 PM

Stuff happens.

Trains, trains, wonderful trains.  The more you get, the more you toot!  Big Smile

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Posted by Deggesty on Wednesday, April 15, 2020 7:45 PM

Wayne is  " The Worms Crawl In, The Worms Crawl Out" song you mention the one that begins "Did you ever think as the hearse rolls by...."? I remember two versions of the ending; both are gruesome. 

Johnny

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Posted by Flintlock76 on Wednesday, April 15, 2020 9:43 PM

That's the one Johnny, and you're not a bona-fide kid if you don't know some version of it!  Kids DO love a good gross-out, and always have.  I learned it when I was a kid, so did Lady Firestorm.

No-one's sure where that one comes from either.  American aviators during the First World War used to sing it together*, real typical military gallows humor there, but it's believed the song is considerably older, at least to the late 19th Century.

Again, I'll save a dissertation on this for Halloween, although anyone can get the story using "The Google Machine."  

Wayne  

*  The music and lyrics were in a book of American soldier songs I found in a used bookstore called "Sound Off!,"  published in 1939, and the book mentioned its popularity with aviators.  I almost split a gut laughing when I saw it!  "Hey!  I KNOW this one!"

In the book it's titled "The Big Grey Hearse."

"The big grey hearse goes rolling by, you don't know whether to laugh or cry.

'Cause you know one day it'll get you too, and it's very next load may consist of you!"  

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Posted by daveklepper on Thursday, April 16, 2020 2:11 AM

The error was inadvertant.  I usually have taken great pains to see that everything fits, but this morning I was distracted from examining the finished post by an important matter, and now I will use the error button to return and corrrect the posting,  A thousand apologies.

But, often I  cannot tell how it will fit until I see the actual posting.  So the posting will run off the right when first posted, but return one hour later, and you wil find the total readable.  I will have done the editing in the interim.   This is particularly true of New York MTA and SEPTA press releases.

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Posted by daveklepper on Thursday, April 16, 2020 2:31 AM

I have no additional knowlege about Titanic or White Star dishes.  Cannot answer Flinktlock's question.

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Posted by daveklepper on Thursday, April 16, 2020 2:46 AM

Turning back to Father Frank Browne SJ's photows, the website caption refers to this as an Engineering Department inspection vehicle. Does Peter have more information?

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Posted by Flintlock76 on Thursday, April 16, 2020 9:39 AM

Doesn't that look cool?

I don't see any evidence of a propulsion system though, I wonder if it was pushed or towed?  

You know, it kind of reminds me of an antique hot dog wagon!  

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Posted by Deggesty on Thursday, April 16, 2020 10:58 AM

Wayne, the one I know begins, "Did you ever wonder, as the hearse goes by, that one these days you will surely die?" Different words, but the sentiment is the same.

Johnny

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Posted by Flintlock76 on Thursday, April 16, 2020 3:06 PM

Deggesty

Wayne, the one I know begins, "Did you ever wonder, as the hearse goes by, that one these days you will surely die?" Different words, but the sentiment is the same.

 

No surprise Johnny, there's lots of variations out there, probably depends on what part of the country you're from. 

Wayne 

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