T1 in Fort Wayne Photo today

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  • Member since
    May 2003
  • From: US
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Posted by BaltACD on Friday, November 8, 2019 8:10 PM

Jones1945
Not only I always want to investigate if there was any corruption happened regarding the purchases of bad quality coals during the transition era, I also want to know the health status of the train crews and residents who lived around the rail track, and the opinion of railfan and passenger during that time period. 
1:28:

Notice the white 'lime scale' ahead of the operating cab on many of the engines pictured in the first half of the video.  Looks like 'bad' water and/or improper chemical additives were being used at that time.

  • Member since
    January 2019
  • From: Henrico, VA
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Posted by Flintlock76 on Friday, November 8, 2019 9:57 PM

I read that "white scale" on the boiler jacketing around the safety valves usually resulted from someone getting a little too enthusiastic adding boiler water treatment chemicals.

Great shots of those T1's!  It doesn't look like bad coal was an issue with the locomotives in the films, except maybe for the last one.  All seem to be expertly fired with little or no smoke.  

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Posted by Overmod on Saturday, November 9, 2019 5:53 PM

Flintlock76
I read that "white scale" on the boiler jacketing around the safety valves usually resulted from someone getting a little too enthusiastic adding boiler water treatment chemicals.

The 'lime scale' is normal.  Look at the films of the 2-10-4s going to Sandusky if you really want a feel for the effect!

Anywhere boiler water goes, you will see these white stains forming just as stalactites/stalagmites do -- the water evaporates and the TDS isn't dissolved any more.

Same thing is happening on the track from the continuous blowdown; you just don't see the deposits as 'crusty'.  

Of course, any little boiler or valve leaks and the crud can build up on seats and checks, which then weep and leak 'wholesale' leading to much more fun.  Someone like Mike can provide us with a picture of this at TMI unit 2 before the 'incident' there...

Now, steam leaks, on the other side of the steam separation in the boiler, shouldn't have more than incidental carryover, so you don't see the effect at places like cylinder glands, and you really shouldn't see it under safety valves except if high water is carried underneath them and priming and foaming take place together.  Won't be fun keeping steam up if you start to get liming in the relevant parts of the pop mechanism!

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