Very strange things

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Posted by Jones1945 on Thursday, July 30, 2020 3:19 AM

Miningman

4)  Something happened to the S1 ... off the rails?.... again!!! Then again maybe not? 

  

Speaking of S1. We heard stories about S1's derailment on the wye at Crestline, but it seems that she got no problem changing direction on the CB&Q wye at Chicago. Maybe the curve radius is larger on the CB&Q wye. I still want to know the exact location of it. 

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Posted by rcdrye on Thursday, July 30, 2020 5:45 AM

The "CB&Q Wye" also known as the "South Approach Wye" is the same one used to turn Amtrak trains in Chicago today.  It  extends from about 14th st to about 18th St a block east of Canal with the west leg extending under Canal. The north leg follows the curve of the CB&Q main line, the south leg is used to reach the PRR's 21st street lift bridge. Both legs are large radius. PRR engines were serviced at 51st St. about four miles south of the wye.

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Posted by Jones1945 on Thursday, July 30, 2020 7:27 AM

rcdrye

The "CB&Q Wye" also known as the "South Approach Wye" is the same one used to turn Amtrak trains in Chicago today.  It extends from about 14th st to about 18th St a block east of Canal with the west leg extending under Canal. The north leg follows the curve of the CB&Q main line, the south leg is used to reach the PRR's 21st street lift bridge. Both legs are large radius. PRR engines were serviced at 51st St. about four miles south of the wye. 

Thanks a lot, rcdrye! I'm gonna visit this place when I travel to the Midwest next time!

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Posted by rcdrye on Thursday, July 30, 2020 8:22 AM

The South Approach Wye is not particularly easy to get to on the ground but easily viewed from Roosevelt Rd.  Roosevelt Rd also marks the boundary between Amtrak/CUS ownership and BNSF/CB&Q for tracks 5 and 6 (Q main line) and 1 (north wye).  The South wye joint area extended to Union Tower near Halsted.  In pre-Amtrak days PRR owned the south wye and everything else south of Roosevelt Rd.  It's now owned by Chicago Union Station/Amtrak as part of the Penn Central/Conrail transition.  In PRR days the south wye switches were not interlocked, but were handled by the 17th St switchtender. A yellow flag gave permission to proceed.  Control of the wye is now handled by CUS Harrison Street tower.

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Posted by Miningman on Wednesday, August 5, 2020 1:48 AM

Ugly Duckling Edition

1)  A face only a designer mother could love.

 

2)  Modern Concept... looks unnecessarily mean and nasty... is that a literal cow catcher up front, as in it grabs the cow and flings it ? Is Monty Python in the house?

 

3)  The Southern Pacific had many strange looking shop switchers hanging around the roundhouse .... here's a doozy.

 

4)  Now here's a contraption with a big stack that you could take to work or maybe even mow the lawn with! 

 

5)  1937 Recreation Vehicle. I know beauty is in the eye of the beholder but it still looks like an egg to me after a week of looking at it... it is kinda cool though. 

 

6) From the deranged Dominion. Back in da day Canadian beer brewer Labatts delivered their products in their own trucks.  I'm trying to like this Ugly Duckling, certainly is noticeable. 

 

7)  The unpronounceable storm is over but there are still some big honkin waves ... let's go surfing!

 

 

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Posted by daveklepper on Wednesday, August 5, 2020 4:14 AM

Well, I Like This One.  Could not come close to winning a race with a UP Big Boy but probably could win a ?"TugofWar!"

And this 0-6-0T seems like the SP's answer to the B&O's 0-4-0T "Dockside Switcher."

Now what country is that box-cab narrow-gauge, big stack, single-buffer oddity from?

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Posted by Overmod on Wednesday, August 5, 2020 6:03 AM

(1) is the H-7, among the first designs to rejuvenate Mallets into simple articulateds.  What you may not recognize is that this is not really a big locomotive -- find a picture of one next to a C&O T-1 2-10-4 and you will see.

(2) is the result of a youth, perhaps not fully over, overly influenced by Gundam.  This show the benefit of good 3D modeling - this was designed from front and side elevations which look good as hell, but the result looks like a Sharknado-style fusion of Dune and Tremors, by way of some millennial cartoon series.

If you think the Labatt's streamliners are extreme, there is a band bus from this era that puts them to shame.  The 'egg' appears to be on something like a Divco chassis with wheels about 10x too strong for the 'carrosserie' -- that streamlining type works fine on something beer-truck or bus length.  You got to both while you were reading up on Aerocars, didn't you?

Meanwhile, the reverse rake on the Labatt windshield is a streamlining curiosity seen elsewhere, notably on some '30s airliners -- notably some of the early Boeing 247s.  It accomplished some of the 'anti-glare' tilt you see on contemporary buses and PCCs but more effectively... you see it again in those screwy postwar French electrics.  Paul Jaray, who tried to trademark 'streamlining', emphasized airframe-like vertical streamlining rather than the wide and flat kind that took over design for a while; the problem is that 'functional' streamlining isn't the same as esthetics... and it's the latter that is the essence in 'Streamline Moderne'. 

By the way, what happens if you combine the Snow Cruiser and Labatt's truck together?  McMurdo Kress!  (Look it up...starting with http://www.kresscarrier.com/DiversifiedPersonnelCarrier.html#.XyqcNjfYrrc)

That little short steamer is to fit on a turntable or go into other length-restricted places in a shop (the balloon stack probably doing exactly what it did in North American practice).  There are motor-driven versions of these that are about as short as something on flanged wheels can be, crackerboxes that are standing-only.

Where is the surf in Florida?

 

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Posted by Flintlock76 on Wednesday, August 5, 2020 10:16 AM

Well!  Let 's take those picture one at a time...

1)  Overheard in the design shop...

     "Looks good Harry, but you left off the air pumps!  Where you gonna put 'em?"

     "Aw nuts!"

2)  Kind of re-enforces the meaning of "Flying blind!"  How do you see out of the front of the thing?  Maybe it doesn't matter when you can't stop on a dime anyway.

3)  Two tanks?  That's easily explained, one for water, one for fuel oil.  As long as it works, I guess.  And speaking of same...

4)  I'm not sure about this one, but considering there's a Czar Nicholas look-alike on the footplate I'm guessing it's Russian.  And over in Russia it doesn't have to look good, it just has to WORK!  Consider the AK-47.

5)  That "Eggmobile" is cool all right.  I THINK I read about it somewhere, and yes, it was intended as an RV, but it just didn't catch on due to the expense.

6)  Wow, that Labatt's truck certainly gets your attention!  Probably the whole idea to begin with.  Anyone remember the Labatt's commercial from years back?

"Try Labatt's beer!  Anyone who doesn't gets two minutes in the penalty box!"

Vince, Lady F want's to know, are Canadians still restricted to beer brands only produced in their particular province?  That surprised her when she heard it on a visit to Newfoundland back in the 80's.

7)  Yeah, there's some surf on Florida's Atlantic coast, but all in all West Coast surfers take pity on the East Coasters.  And anyone remember when the bikini on the girl in the foreground was considered revealing and HOT?  If we only knew!

Just a guess, but I think that car's on Daytona Beach.  The beach there is famous for motor vehicle traffic. 

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Posted by Miningman on Wednesday, August 5, 2020 2:16 PM

 

Excerpt from
 

  

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Posted by Overmod on Wednesday, August 5, 2020 4:37 PM

The balanced simple articulated was the first of two important steps, but it still had the running drawbacks of the original.  As Huddleston says, the story of fixing those is the real story of modern articulateds, and it would not start until 1930 or take off, really, until 1934...

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Posted by pennytrains on Wednesday, August 5, 2020 6:59 PM
  1. I like it!  I've always been a bit partial to the feedwater heater on the smokebox front look.
  2. Maybe they're planning to pass an arc between those protrusions?  Hmm
  3. I guess that's how you do an oil-fired tank loco.
  4. Predecessor of the parking lot tram?
  5. That's a reggreational vehicle.  Whistling
  6. I'm surprised there are no O-scale models of that truck.
  7. Is it just me, or has the roof collapsed on the right side and knocked the left rear corner out?

Big Smile  Same me, different spelling!  Big Smile

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Posted by Miningman on Wednesday, August 5, 2020 7:51 PM

Penny-- Thanks for the comments. Yes the car looks a wee bit overloaded ...left rear tire under strain as well but what the heck when you're that age it's all kinda cool. 

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Posted by M636C on Wednesday, August 5, 2020 8:33 PM

Is it just me, or has the roof collapsed on the right side and knocked the left rear corner out?

Penny, as someone old enough to remember the early (1960-62 or so) Ford Falcon station wagons, I think what you are seeing is an aftermarket aerofoil intended to reduce dust accumulation on the rear window (since they didn't have rear wipers in those days...

The ones I remember were stainless steel or chrome plated and didn't look too bad.

Those Fords had wind-down windows at the rear, so the aerofoil didn't have to clear a lifting hatch and could extend around the rear, giving the appearance of misalignment.

 

 

Note the "misalignment" between the pillar and the tailgate and the wind down window locating in the pillars.

Peter

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Posted by Miningman on Wednesday, August 5, 2020 8:49 PM

Aerofoil? You sure .. that car looks just overloaded and is strained to the point of being ' all bust up'... can you supply a clear photo? 

Here's a Holeeee Smoke what the heck. 


Ugly Duckling?  Yes or No? 

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Posted by M636C on Wednesday, August 5, 2020 9:12 PM

Here is a view from the same angle, just with the tailgate up...

It appears that the original pillars were "misaligned" due to the width of the tailgate and the narrower window.

Peter

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Posted by M636C on Wednesday, August 5, 2020 9:57 PM

 But why is it at Darlington?

The locomotive was built at Doncaster, miles away to the south.

The record was made south of Grantham, more than a hundred miles to the south.

And how did the smoke blow down symmetrically on both sides of the train? I've never seen that...

Peter

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Posted by Miningman on Thursday, August 6, 2020 1:18 AM

Mike knows the answer!

Posted by M636C on Wednesday, August 5, 2020 9:57 PM
 

And how did the smoke blow down symmetrically on both sides of the train? I've never seen that...

The train is exiting a tunnel faster than its smoke can escape its tunnelly shape.

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Posted by Miningman on Thursday, August 6, 2020 1:56 AM
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Posted by Jones1945 on Thursday, August 6, 2020 6:23 AM

Miningman

6) From the deranged Dominion. Back in da day Canadian beer brewer Labatts delivered their products in their own trucks.  I'm trying to like this Ugly Duckling, certainly is noticeable. 

This one is interesting but a bit too cartoonish! If you are looking for a normal and practical stream-styled truck design, please take a look at this Nairn Transport trailer coach built by Marmon-Herrington. They were used in long-distance coach service between Damascus and Baghdad:

 

 

 

 

https://martintristramrose.org/2016/09/24/running-to-catch-the-bus-1/

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Posted by Flintlock76 on Thursday, August 6, 2020 8:34 AM

M636C

 But why is it at Darlington?

The locomotive was built at Doncaster, miles away to the south.

The record was made south of Grantham, more than a hundred miles to the south.

And how did the smoke blow down symmetrically on both sides of the train? I've never seen that...

Peter

 

I thought that was a lawn ornament at Lego corporate HQ.

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Posted by pennytrains on Thursday, August 6, 2020 6:30 PM

Flintlock76

 

 
M636C

 But why is it at Darlington?

The locomotive was built at Doncaster, miles away to the south.

The record was made south of Grantham, more than a hundred miles to the south.

And how did the smoke blow down symmetrically on both sides of the train? I've never seen that...

Peter

 

 

 

I thought that was a lawn ornament at Lego corporate HQ.

 

I also thought it must have been built in lego bricks first.  Big Smile

Big Smile  Same me, different spelling!  Big Smile

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Posted by pennytrains on Thursday, August 6, 2020 6:38 PM

Here's a White Motors/Greyhound version:

Big Smile  Same me, different spelling!  Big Smile

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Posted by Flintlock76 on Thursday, August 6, 2020 6:51 PM

pennytrains

Here's a White Motors/Greyhound version:

 

Considering it was in the Middle East I'd guess that Nairn Transport "bus" is long gone, but I wonder if that White Great Lakes Exposition people-hauler made it into some form of preservation?  

Or maybe the Nairn is in a Damascus or Bahgdad back alley somewhere waiting to be discovered?

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Posted by Miningman on Thursday, August 6, 2020 8:22 PM

Go top down, only way!

Or take the Santa Fe...

You go left, I go right !

Who the heck's a bus fan? Not me. This is the only way acceptable to go by bus.

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Posted by Flintlock76 on Thursday, August 6, 2020 8:33 PM

Yeah, I'm not a fan of stinky smelly buses either, but that thing in the first photo looks like one hell of a party wagon!  

Imagine cruisin' cross-country with a bunch of the guys, and gals too if they want to come along, sandwiches, cold beer, some dessert platters with coffee, maybe a few stops at some prime fishing spots...

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Posted by Overmod on Thursday, August 6, 2020 8:51 PM

Flintlock76
Or maybe the Nairn is in a Damascus or Baghdad back alley somewhere waiting to be discovered?

The Nairns gave the company to their employees in the early '50s instead of letting governments 'nationalize' it; the service persisted to 1959.  It is possible that a Marmon-Herrington has survived as well as one of the Budds... I'm still hoping for at least one of the streamlined Iraqi Pacifics...

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Posted by Miningman on Friday, August 7, 2020 12:39 AM

From Mike titled "Literary Sominex"



1938 book pages about Nairn Transport 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
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Posted by Miningman on Friday, August 7, 2020 1:30 AM

"New type sleeper trailer, of light-weight, stainless steel construction, for travel in Syrian desert. Constructed by the Edward G. Budd Company of Philadelphia, for the Nairn Transport Company, Ltd., the trailer utilizes the same principles of construction incorporated in Budd-built light-weight trains. It is of 14-passenger capacity. Pulled by a 150-horsepower Diesel tractor, the unit weighs less than 28,000 pounds and is capable of a top speed on the desert of 65 miles an hour.

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Posted by Jones1945 on Friday, August 7, 2020 4:55 AM

Miningman

I made a mistake. The longer one was built by Marmon-Herrington, this one was built by Budd:

 

Miningman

Or take the Santa Fe...

You go left, I go right !

It is hard to believe that this thing had a capacity of 117 passengers... 

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