World's fair wonder

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Posted by Penny Trains on Wednesday, February 27, 2019 8:16 PM

Would've been an obvious choice:

Big Smile  I'm Cuckoo For Choo Choo Stuffs!  Big Smile

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Posted by Erik_Mag on Thursday, February 28, 2019 12:37 AM

A possible runner up choice would have been if CUT needed more electric locomotives and got standard gauge versions the Paulista 3KVDC passenger locomotive with the NYNH&H EP-4 carbody.

I wonder of my mom visited the Cleveland fair, she was 15 at the time and living in Lakewood. I do remember her talking about CUT and the Lake Shore Electric.

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Posted by Jones1945 on Thursday, February 28, 2019 4:04 AM

Penny Trains

Would've been an obvious choice:

Thank you, Becky. It really looks like an upside down bathtub but it was a cute bathtub :-)  Sometimes, a product or service which can make user laugh can be a success as well; Although it was not Mr. Dreyfuss original intention to entertain the traveler with an upside-down bathtub, but the Mercury was undoubtedly a successful train of NYCRR.  

The Dreyfuss K5a when serving the train James Whitcomb Riley (Chicago <-> Cincinnati ) Another train using rebuilt HW equipment, noted the bathtub shrouding was extended, exposing the firebox and the trailing truck. 

 

I prefer the construction method and design of PRR's betterment observation car to NYC's cars, but they still looked decent with the lightweight equipment. 

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Posted by Penny Trains on Thursday, February 28, 2019 7:58 PM

Yeah.  Those widebody converts were a bit odd looking.

But, so was the locomotive!  Laugh

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Posted by Penny Trains on Thursday, February 28, 2019 8:15 PM

Erik_Mag
I wonder of my mom visited the Cleveland fair, she was 15 at the time and living in Lakewood. I do remember her talking about CUT and the Lake Shore Electric.

The book I have suggests that depending on how much and where you ate, and how many souvenirs you bought, the cost of attending would range between 6 and 15 dollars in 1936/37.  Adjusted for inflation, that's 100 to 250 dollars per person, per day.  My mom says my grandparents used to walk there from their home on West 65th St.  (However that's quite a hike so if they did go they most likely used public transit.)  My grandparents certainly didn't have money so if they did go, I'm sure they spent as little as possible.  It was the height of the great depression after all.  But they didn't have 10 kids yet either.  Wink

Most sources describe the Expo's guests as well heeled, well dressed and well...white.

It didn't help that the Florida exhibit had "happy singing simulated slaves" working by the simulated plantation house:

Did I mention that John D. lived here?

Euclid Avenue was known as "Millionaire's Row".

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Posted by Jones1945 on Friday, March 01, 2019 3:48 AM

Penny Trains

Yeah.  Those widebody converts were a bit odd looking.

But, so was the locomotive!  Laugh

 

They were the perfect match Stick out tongue Maybe Mr. Dreyfuss wanted to emphasize the inner beauty of the Mercury Train, but why couldn't we have both? CoffeeLaugh

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Posted by Erik_Mag on Saturday, March 02, 2019 12:23 AM

Penny Trains

The book I have suggests that depending on how much and where you ate, and how many souvenirs you bought, the cost of attending would range between 6 and 15 dollars in 1936/37.

Becky,

Sounds like something my grandfather could afford, since he would have the expense of just him and my mom - my grandmother died when my mom was 3. Don't if he would have driven or taken the Lake Shore Electric. The event does seem like something he would have taken my mom to see.

A weird thought, the only time I've been to Cleveland was in 1962 (age 7), which would have been 26 years after the fair - been more than twice that time since that trip. Don't remember much of the city, most of the memories were of my great aunt's (grandmother's sister) house in Shaker Heights.

 - Erik

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Posted by Jones1945 on Saturday, March 02, 2019 7:47 PM

FYI.

What cost 15 dollars in 1936 and 1937 would cost $271.63 and 262.2 in 2019 respectively. Almost enough to buy a 5-car HO scale plastic trainset (made in China) today. 

A round trip for a seat on PRR Trail Blazer was $30.9 in 1939, would cost $565.25 in 2018.

UA non stop coach class (a.k.a no class), NY to Chi-Town $246, First Class $620.59 (would cost 33.93 in 1939) 

Travel time: Choo Choo 1939--> 17 hours, Amtrak 2019 --->19h10mins ($220 round trip)
Air--------> 2hr30mins + check in 1.45 hours in advance = around 4-5 hours (assuming no delay). 

 

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Posted by M636C on Saturday, March 02, 2019 11:39 PM

Penny Trains

Would've been an obvious choice:

 

Interestingly, The Japanese tried this design first:

http://tadayusaku.3.pro.tok2.com/pashina/05.jpg

The photo shows locomotive 751 preserved in Shenyang in about 1981

Peter

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Posted by Jones1945 on Sunday, March 03, 2019 11:54 AM

M636C

 

 
Penny Trains

Would've been an obvious choice:

 

 

 

Interestingly, The Japanese tried this design first:

http://tadayusaku.3.pro.tok2.com/pashina/05.jpg

The photo shows locomotive 751 preserved in Shenyang in about 1981

Peter

It is still a case unclosed! I believe the Japanese who designed the 1934 Asia Express, who was employed by NYC in the early-1930s, saw the draft of the proposed streamlined Mercury and stolen the idea, applied it on the Asia Express. 

https://www.trains-worldexpresses.com/500/507.htm

Coincidence? No, NO, NOO.

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Posted by Penny Trains on Sunday, March 03, 2019 7:27 PM

Erik_Mag
if he would have driven or taken the Lake Shore Electric.

The Lake Shore had a loop at the East 9th Street pier.  You can make it out in this photo just above the large lake steamer on the left:

Cars on the loop during the expo:

And in 1938:

Legend says that during the 2 years that Admiral Byrd's ship was docked at the expo, the city was busy building a bridge that would end up trapping the ship and keeping it from continuing it's tour.

Doubt that's true.

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Posted by rcdrye on Monday, March 04, 2019 7:21 AM

The loop was part of Cleveland Rwy's East 9th Street line.  The fair was probably the last hurrah for Lake Shore Electric's wooden cars.  You can see the condition of the cars' paint in a couple of the pictures.

Lake Shore Electric's cars normally terminated at Public Square, in front of Terminal Tower by 1936 (That's the tall building.  Tallest west of New York until 1964).  East 9th cars didn't go to the public square, but track connections worked out for the LSE's cars to use Superior to E. 9th.

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