Thank you Mr. Abbey

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Thank you Mr. Abbey
Posted by Miningman on Wednesday, January 2, 2019 12:24 PM

Today's Photo of the Day is truly a remarkable picture and at the right time. Perhaps something we wondered about or took for granted but here it is Sept. 1952 and Mr. Abbey has the foresight to capture an era that was heading off a cliff. Everything here is for passenger service. A modellers delight. A historians delight. A railfans delight. 

Thank you Mr Abbey and Classic Trains.

20190102

Locomotives for Cincinnati Union Terminal

E units belonging to Louisville & Nashville, Chesapeake & Ohio, New York Central, and Pennsylvania idle on the ready tracks near the Cincinnati Union Terminal roundhouse in September 1952. Baltimore & Ohio, CUT, Norfolk & Western, and C&O steam engines populate the whisker tracks in the background.
Wallace W. Abbey photography 

 

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Posted by Flintlock76 on Friday, January 4, 2019 1:33 PM

"Thank you Mr. Abbey!"  indeed!

I guess the lesson to today's railfan photographers is don't pass up a photo op no matter how commonplace and mundane it might be, because you never know, do you?

What's commonplace today can be "gone with the wind" tomorrow.

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Posted by Trinity River Bottoms Boomer on Friday, January 4, 2019 4:32 PM

How true it is.  Also, the loss of one's photos can be very depressing.  I loaned out several which have since become classics that were never returned.  What a bummer!

TRBB

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Posted by M636C on Friday, January 4, 2019 5:24 PM

I assume the art deco style building just visible on the left of the photograph is part of the terminal itself. Fortunately at least part of the terminal building survives. I recall there being a locomotive facility still in place near the terminal in the 1970s.

Peter

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Posted by Jones1945 on Friday, January 4, 2019 5:53 PM

I prefer the Art Deco interior design of the Cincinnati Union Terminal to the Grand Central Terminal. This station always reminds me of the never happened train: The Chessie of C&O. Thank you Mr. Abbey, goodbye Chessie! Whisper

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Posted by CSSHEGEWISCH on Saturday, January 5, 2019 10:06 AM

Never having seen the interior of Cincinnati Union Terminal, I really can't make an informed comment.  I have trouble choosing between Grand Central Terminal, Los Angeles Union Station and Chicago Union Station.  All are excellent designs.  King Street Station in Seattle is an excellent design for a smaller station.

The daily commute is part of everyday life but I get two rides a day out of it. Paul
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Posted by Flintlock76 on Saturday, January 5, 2019 11:11 AM

The only great terminal I've ever been in is Grand Central Terminal in New York, and it is an awesome sight, not just for the architecture but for all the history as well.

I've got a personal connection as well.  My grandfather worked in GCT's Oyster Bar for a while, and he learned to make a Manhattan clam chowder that Dad said was the best he'd ever had.  Oddly enough, only Grandpa would make it, he never showed Grandma or Dad how to do it.  Dad has no idea why.

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Posted by Trinity River Bottoms Boomer on Saturday, January 5, 2019 1:24 PM

It doesn't come close but Tampa Union Station remains full of memories of two teenage boys who made TUS their second home during the early 60s. 

They not only witnessed the great trains of Atlantic Coast Line and Seaboard Air Line as they took passengers from the Sunshine State to The Big Apple, but talked shop with the train crews, picked up the latest copy of Trains, THE Magazine of Railroading off the newsstand, or receiving a free Coke, Reg.U.S.Pat.Off., from the lady who ran the kisok, just because they were always polite and well behaved.

Sometimes the memories is what makes a train station more than just the interior.  Regretfully, I lost my best friend in 2006.  He'll be gone 13 years come this 2019 April, but the memories remain.  RIP Robert, I miss you!

Trinity River Bottoms Boomer

 

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Posted by Penny Trains on Saturday, January 5, 2019 7:06 PM

It's certainly interresting: https://www.cincymuseum.org/union-terminal/

 

Trains, trains, wonderful trains.  The more you get, the more you toot!  Big Smile

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Posted by Flintlock76 on Saturday, January 5, 2019 7:47 PM

Penny Trains

It's certainly interresting: https://www.cincymuseum.org/union-terminal/

 

 

Hmmmmmm...

Looks like an Amtrak customer service rep under the current "Delta Dick" Anderson regime.

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Posted by Jones1945 on Sunday, January 6, 2019 3:35 AM
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Posted by M636C on Sunday, January 6, 2019 5:24 AM

It reminds me of the Pantheon in Rome.

The Pantheon had a full circle for the floor plan.

CUT was a semicircle in plan, one quarter of a sphere in shape. It was flat on the front (non rail) side.

Peter

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Posted by Flintlock76 on Sunday, January 6, 2019 10:52 AM

M636C

It reminds me of the Pantheon in Rome.

The Pantheon had a full circle for the floor plan.

CUT was a semicircle in plan, one quarter of a sphere in shape. It was flat on the front (non rail) side.

Peter

 

Quite true, but I can't help but think the Pantheon might have been an inspiration for CUT's "rotunda," fo lack of a better term.  

One thing the Pantheon and CUT certainly have in common is both were built to last, nothing temporary about either of them.  The Emperor Agrippa and the people behind CUT wanted future generations to see and be awed by what they'd created.  They both got their wish!

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Posted by Penny Trains on Sunday, January 6, 2019 7:06 PM

To me, and many others raised in the 70's, it will always be....

Ohio's "other" CUT:

If Columbus had one, we'd be a state with three CUT's!  Wink

Trains, trains, wonderful trains.  The more you get, the more you toot!  Big Smile

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Posted by Flintlock76 on Sunday, January 6, 2019 7:29 PM

You know what they say...

"Imitation is the sincerest form of flattery."

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Posted by Jones1945 on Sunday, January 13, 2019 2:57 AM

M636C

It reminds me of the Pantheon in Rome.

The Pantheon had a full circle for the floor plan.

CUT was a semicircle in plan, one quarter of a sphere in shape. It was flat on the front (non rail) side.

Peter

You are absolutely right, Peter. That's why people can take a photo like this to show the uniqueness of the station:

http://web.nmsu.edu/~Jesush/Designstyles/index.html

 

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Posted by Flintlock76 on Sunday, January 13, 2019 9:36 AM

Now I don't know why I didn't think of this sooner, but you know what the rotunda of CUT reminds me of?  Radio City Music Hall in New York!

Check this out...

https://docnickphotos.files.wordpress.com/2012/03/img_9615.jpg  

I remember going to the Radio City Christmas show with my family as a boy, I was eight, maybe nine years old, and when I saw that interior to say I was overwhelmed is an understatement!

 

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Posted by Jones1945 on Monday, January 14, 2019 1:13 AM

Flintlock76

Now I don't know why I didn't think of this sooner, but you know what the rotunda of CUT reminds me of?  Radio City Music Hall in New York!

Check this out...

https://docnickphotos.files.wordpress.com/2012/03/img_9615.jpg  

I remember going to the Radio City Christmas show with my family as a boy, I was eight, maybe nine years old, and when I saw that interior to say I was overwhelmed is an understatement! 

Fascinating, Wayne. Architecture like the Radio City Music Hall is one of those glamorous places which inspire and encourage people to study performing arts and work in the music industry. The Rockefeller Center complex is one of my favorites skyscraper projects as well. 

All these legendary building and place made NYC unreplaceable. But if NYC is a legendary city, where is the legendary train which matches the cities global status? 

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