Bearings Question

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Posted by BaltACD on Monday, April 30, 2018 9:00 PM

Want to find out how poor your 'keyboarding' skills are.  Use a typewriter!

         

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Posted by Deggesty on Monday, April 30, 2018 9:06 PM

It certainly is easier to correct mistakes when working this way--IF you carefully read through what you have written before commiting it to the public.

Johnny

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Posted by jeffhergert on Monday, April 30, 2018 9:59 PM

AgentKid

 

 
cx500
If I remember correctly, the carbon paper used when writing train orders was carboned on both sides. Office carbon paper was one sided.

 

The carbon paper we had at Irricana about 1960 was one sided. I remember learning how to put the carbon paper the right way about that time.

Bruce

 

 

The Rock Island depots I used to visit had double sided carbon paper for train orders.  The RI (UCOR 1968) made 5 copies of an order for one train.  (A copy for the engineer, a second copy for the head brakeman and fireman to read.  A copy for the conductor and a copy for the rear brakeman/flagman.  Plus one office copy.)  With double sided carbons, one was inserted between the 2nd and 3rd copy, and between the 4th and 5th copy.  The duplication on the 2nd and 4th copies was on the back of the train order form but could easily be read.  About 13 copies of one order (for 3 trains) could be made this way.  The operator always had forms ready for the typewriter in groups of 5, 9 and 13.

Jeff     

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Posted by BaltACD on Tuesday, May 01, 2018 11:17 AM

jeffhergert
 
AgentKid
 
cx500
If I remember correctly, the carbon paper used when writing train orders was carboned on both sides. Office carbon paper was one sided. 

The carbon paper we had at Irricana about 1960 was one sided. I remember learning how to put the carbon paper the right way about that time.

Bruce 

The Rock Island depots I used to visit had double sided carbon paper for train orders.  The RI (UCOR 1968) made 5 copies of an order for one train.  (A copy for the engineer, a second copy for the head brakeman and fireman to read.  A copy for the conductor and a copy for the rear brakeman/flagman.  Plus one office copy.)  With double sided carbons, one was inserted between the 2nd and 3rd copy, and between the 4th and 5th copy.  The duplication on the 2nd and 4th copies was on the back of the train order form but could easily be read.  About 13 copies of one order (for 3 trains) could be made this way.  The operator always had forms ready for the typewriter in groups of 5, 9 and 13.

Jeff     

B&O standard for Train Orders was 3 copies for a Freight Train, 4 copies for a Passenger train.  

On Freight Trains a copy was delivered to the engineer and conductor with the remaining copy being retained in the office file.

On Passenger Trains a copy was delivered to the engineer, baggageman and conductor with the remaining copy being retained in the office file.

If two trains were addressed at the same point, the Dispatcher would instruct the opeator to 'copy 5 (or 6 if a passenger train was one of the trains)'.  Orders were addressed to the most restricted operator first, who would also repeat the order first.  Orders were not effective unless the Dispatcher issued a 'Complete with the Dispatchers initials and time'.  If communications failed, before complete was recieved 'the order had never been sent'.  Dispatchers specified the number of copies to be made when initiating the call. '19 West copy five' etc.  19 orders could be picked up on the fly.  31 orders were more restricive and the train had to be stopped to get them delivered.

Offices where there wasn't a 'billing machine' typewriter available the orders were hand written using a stylus with a thin metal 'plate' used to be the writing surface of the TO Pad so a not to leave a impression on the deeper orders on the TO Pad. 

When orders were 'typewritten' everything had to be in All Capital letters - thus the use of 'Billing Machines' that only contained capitals.

B&O used double sided carbons.  The active TO Pad would be stuffed with carbons 20 pages deep or more thus the thin metal plate to separate the written from the unwritten copies.  Maximum number of copies was 13.

If a 'standing order' was issued ie. to be delivered to All trains - the Dispatcher would initate the call with '19 West copy a bunch'. 

In later years some train order offices got Xerox machines and the cabons went away.

         

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Posted by Deggesty on Tuesday, May 01, 2018 11:27 AM

The Southern also used two-sided carbon paper. I have several train orders, given me my trainmen, which have the writing on the back as well as on the front.

Johnny

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Posted by AgentKid on Tuesday, May 01, 2018 12:06 PM

BaltACD
B&O standard for Train Orders was 3 copies for a Freight Train, 4 copies for a Passenger train.

I don't remember what Dad did at Hatton on the mainline, but Irricana was a branchline station. I know at least two carbon papers were used, so that would be three copies. Mixed trains got one for the engineer, conductor and one for the station at least. There were two sizes of hoop available, but the ones meant for a caboose were never used, as being a Division Point(Junction of Langdon and Irricana Subs.) all trains stopped anyway to register.

I can't say I've ever seen a backwards typed copy of a CPR train order, even in a book. Such a thing at mainline stations or terminals could certainly be possible.

Bruce

 

So shovel the coal, let this rattler roll.

"A Train is a Place Going Somewhere"  CP Rail Public Timetable

"O. S. Irricana"

. . . __ . ______

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Posted by MidlandMike on Wednesday, May 02, 2018 9:42 PM

Why did the baggageman get a copy of the train orders?

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Posted by Deggesty on Thursday, May 03, 2018 7:57 AM

MidlandMike

Why did the baggageman get a copy of the train orders?

 

Often, on passenger trains the headend brakeman also handled the checked baggage. Thus, the baggageman had the responsibility of lining switches at meeting points.

Johnny

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Posted by daveklepper on Thursday, May 03, 2018 10:07 AM

But in that case wasn't he still the head brakeman as a title, not baggageman?

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Posted by Deggesty on Thursday, May 03, 2018 2:12 PM

Deggesty

 

 
MidlandMike

Why did the baggageman get a copy of the train orders?

 

 

 

Often, on passenger trains the headend brakeman also handled the checked baggage. Thus, the baggageman had the responsibility of lining switches at meeting points.

 

 

Perhaps I should added that I am not sure that the question has any bearing on the original topic. Carl, correct me if I am wrong, please.

Johnny

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Posted by Deggesty on Thursday, May 03, 2018 3:14 PM

daveklepper

But in that case wasn't he still the head brakeman as a title, not baggageman?

 

Perhaps he had two hats, and wore one when he handled baggage and the other when he lined switches or tied brakes down?Smile

His exact title may have depended upon the road he worked for?

Remember that the rear end brakeman also had flagging responsibilties when flagging was necessary--and on passenger trains he was usually called the flagman.

Johnny

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