Israeli Steam

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Posted by Overmod on Sunday, November 19, 2017 8:42 AM

And here I am thinking miningman had Firelock76 in the fez as part of a Zouave uniform.  I have family history in connection with that, so was tickled to see the reference.

REAL men lie down to reload!

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Posted by Firelock76 on Sunday, November 19, 2017 10:08 AM

You're not kidding!  Real men ain't stupid!

As much as I love my flintlocks there's no way I'd bring one to a modern fire-fight.  That's what the M-1's for! Or the M-1A, or the M-1 carbine...

I don't think I could pull off a Zouave uniform like Colonel Ellsworth's boys anyway.  Those guys had panache!

And M636, certainly the surrender of the Japanese on Borneo didn't get the attention that the surrender in Tokyo Bay did, but your father and the rest of the lads DID get the satisfaction of seeing the Japanese officers, from generals down to second lieutenants, lay down their samurai swords.  That must have been priceless!

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Posted by wanswheel on Monday, November 20, 2017 1:07 AM

M636C

Another headwear option is the so called "slouch" hat of the Australian Army. This was clipped up on the left side, but could be worn as a normal hat. The brim was clipped up to allow the Lee-Enfield 0.303 rifle to be "shouldered". I myself learnt to do this in the high school cadet corps with a gun that dated back to 1917.

This is relevant because one hundred years ago, the Australian Light Horse (wearing these hats, with emu feathers), took part in the last big cavalry charge, occupying the town of Beersheba in Palestine, which opened the land route to Gaza, Jaffa and Jerusalem. We are told that this marked the end of Turkish rule in Palestine. It is possible that the story told elsewhere might give more credit to the British Army. 

https://archive.org/stream/australianimperi07gulluoft#page/384/mode/2up

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Posted by M636C on Tuesday, November 21, 2017 6:03 AM

wanswheel

Thanks, wanswheel, for those photos...

I note the camel soldier has emu feathers on his hat. I assume he transferred to the Imperial Camel Force from the Light Horse. The thing that struck me was the photographer was a sergeant in the Australian Flying Corps.

Many of the photographs are credited to the "Auistralian War Museum". When this was finally opened (in 1941, a rather unfortunate year regarding war) the name became "The Australian War Memorial". This is located a block from my home and is an amazing place, definitely a museum rather than a memorial.

The title, "Australian Imperial Force" was used again in WWII, but because it was only twenty years later, the title was the "Second Australian Imperial Force".  The "second" was repeated all the way down the line, my father's regiment being the "2nd/1st Anti- Aircraft".

In 1941, the Australian Army Engineers built a standard gauge railway from Haifa in Palestine to Beirut in Lebanon which formed a link from Egypt up to Turkey, to avoid having to use shipping in the Mediterranean for military supplies. The section in Palestine (noe Israel) was closed after the war, but most of the line in Lebanon remained open into the 1960s. This line used the strange little EMD G6Bs, which had a single traction motor geared to three axles.

Peter

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Posted by daveklepper on Tuesday, November 21, 2017 7:12 AM

The track north from Haifa to Naharia is still in use for daily except the Sabbath freight and passenger service.  Some passenger trains run between Naharia and Beir Sheva in the south, running express between Haifa and T.  A.  When I was last in Rosh Hanikra, the track into the tunnel at the boarder was still in place but not used, and there was a wall in the tunnel, seen from thr tunnel entrance.  Not sure the track still exists north of Naharia.  And possibly the tunnel has been closed further with Hezbolah controling nearby areas in Lebanon at the moment,

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Posted by M636C on Thursday, November 23, 2017 5:08 AM

daveklepper

The track north from Haifa to Naharia is still in use for daily except the Sabbath freight and passenger service.  Some passenger trains run between Naharia and Beir Sheva in the south, running express between Haifa and T. A.  When I was last in Rosh Hanikra, the track into the tunnel at the border was still in place but not used, and there was a wall in the tunnel, seen from the tunnel entrance.  Not sure the track still exists north of Naharia.  And possibly the tunnel has been closed further with Hezbolah controling nearby areas in Lebanon at the moment,

 
Dave,
 
I seem to have misread Hugh Hughes' book on this subject.
He may have been referring to the cessation of through traffic and not the closure of the line on each side of the border. The book is a bit complex, with references to this line in sections on Palestine, Lebanon and a section called "Middle East Forces". His maps show the line on the Isreali side open to Naharia.
 
I even got the reference to the builders wrong. It was South African troops wo built the section from Haifa to Beirut, the Australians building the section north of Beirut.
 
However, it was British Commonwealth forces that built the line, of course.
 
Peter
 
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Posted by Trinity River Bottoms Boomer on Thursday, November 30, 2017 5:12 AM

Dave: Off subject perhaps but are you a model railroader?

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Posted by daveklepper on Thursday, November 30, 2017 1:57 PM

I was.   Had a small oval-with-siding HO layout in my parents' home basement, first with an American Flyer NYC J1 with New Haven coaches, then with a Penn-Line K4 and assorted kit-assembled freight cars and a P-54 coach from someplace, plus a Mantua open-platform coach and combine.  Everything went to the MIT Tech Model Railroad Club in 1949, and also got a PCC for the streetcar line there.   When I left MIT in June 1957, my active model railroading ended.  I left the equipment behind there.  I subscribed to the Model Railroader about 1945-1957.   There was also an hiatus while in Army active service 1954-1956.

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Posted by Trinity River Bottoms Boomer on Friday, December 01, 2017 5:38 AM

Neat trains!  You recall that the late great self-proclaimed "Doctor of Sick Railroads" John W. Barriger III was a MIT graduate too.  I imigine you were an officer in the US Army?  I made Sp4 in the Transportation Corps.  I retain fond memories when I attended the USATC school at Ft. Eustus, VA during the autumn of 64.  Took ACL home for Christmas to visit my folks in Tampa; SAL back to VA.  MATS flew me to Germany in Jan. 65 just so I could witness all that beautiful active Deutsche Bundesbahn steam firsthand!

I received a Lionel 027 set for my 1951 Christmas, then modeled some in HO.  Now all I have is a large scale ATSF red caboose made by LGB to remind me of  days spent working for John Santa Fe in Dallas.

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Posted by daveklepper on Saturday, December 02, 2017 12:56 PM

I went through ROTC at MIT.  Wasn't all patriotism, needed the money also, and was glad I enrolled after the Korean War broke out, after I was enrolled.  Took ROTC Summer Camp at Fort Monthmouth, NJ, a year early, between Soph abd Jr years, enabling me to have summer job with EMD, La Grange, the next year, summer 1952.  After a not-especially productive year at Grad School, MIT, went on active duty 1954, and after brief assignments af Fort Dix and Fort Monmouth, began service as Asst. Audio-Radio Member, PsyWar Board, Ft. Bragg, NC.  Back to grad school 1956, Masters Degree June 1957, Bolt Beranek and Newman, architectural acoustics to 1971, month at Bell Labs, Klepper Marshalll King to June 1996.

Here am I and my detachment at Fort Bragg:

I'm in the center.  To the left, also in Kakis, is PFC (eventually to make Staff Sgnt.), Jerry Dyar, also a railfan, and classmate at MIT who did not take ROTC.

And even though I was his immediate boss in the Army, we remained good friends.

 

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Posted by Firelock76 on Saturday, December 02, 2017 3:41 PM

I may have posted this in the past, but here's a link to the MIT model railroad club...

http://tmrc.mit.edu/

Interesting site!  Go to the "About" section for a history of the club plus a membership list going back to 1946.  Guess who's in there?

No, not me, I don't have the brains for MIT!  David's there all right!  Cool!  Like meeting an old friend in a faraway place!

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