7 2-8-0's required for one train...regularly

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  • Member since
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  • From: Henrico, VA
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Posted by Firelock76 on Wednesday, September 13, 2017 6:55 PM

I think what David's asking about is that Blackwater Canyon roadbed.

As of this time as I posted earlier it's now a hiking trail.  Chances of it being returned to rail service are probably non-existant.  Aside from coal, which would be a marginal revenue source in this day and age I can't think of any other source of traffic along the abandoned line.  Could be wrong, though.

Unless he's talking about the Patterson Creek roadbed.  That I don't know about, but I doubt that would come back either.  I don't know of any abandoned rail lines where the track has been lifted that have miraculously come back to life.

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Posted by daveklepper on Thursday, September 14, 2017 1:09 PM

Navaho Canyon line in California.   State bought the RoW, allowed SP to lift the rails, now relaid and used by tourist operation.

Lackawanna and Wyoming Valley, the Laurel Line interurban.  Tracks relaid through the tunnel near steamtown, and tourist passenger operations instituted, now serves a transportion purpose as well, between Steamtown and anothe museum site.

A number of light rail operatoins are on abandoned railroad rights-of-way and also restoring ripped-up streetcar tracks.

None of this is applicable in this case, so maybe you are right anyway.

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Posted by Trinity River Bottoms Boomer on Thursday, September 14, 2017 4:12 PM

Though the track remains in place between Dallas and Denton, sadly, The Katy no longer "Serves the Southwest Well" but back in the 1920s the Texas Interurban Ry. hung wire and provided regularly scheduled passenger service over Katy's Denton Branch.  Who says you can't go back?  DART is up and running over this same line today! 

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Posted by Firelock76 on Thursday, September 14, 2017 6:57 PM

David and Trinity, you gents are amazing, I never would have thought of those lines you mentioned.

Trinity, I'm kicking myself, I've BEEN to Denton and seen the DART trains!  Should have thought of that myself.  And those trains are very popular from what I've read.

Nice town, Denton.  A great walking town, and I just love the old courthouse.  Walk down a corridor in the place and you half-expect to run into Wyatt Earp!

If any of you folks make it to Denton try Cartwright's Restaurant.  Fantastic!

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Posted by cx500 on Thursday, September 14, 2017 7:10 PM

I know nothing about the branch in question, but suspect that the full set of seven locomotives might be in the train for the relatively short distance of a ruling grade.  The helper engines might then be used for other trains, either on the same branch or others nearby.  Economics of helper service are never desirable but it might not be quite as severe as the picture suggests. 

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Posted by daveklepper on Friday, September 15, 2017 12:38 AM

But again, not a severe picture in its time.  An eleven-car coal train with one locomotive was profitable then, and indeed may be profitable in some circumstances today; so 78 cars with seven locomotives also means profits.

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Posted by Trinity River Bottoms Boomer on Friday, September 15, 2017 7:24 AM

How silly of me, I almost forgot to mention the historic McKinney Avenue Trolley in Dallas, ironically operates over a portion of the original track that had been covered up when street car service was discontinued in Big D in the mid-50s.  

Amazing more perhaps, until 1962 in the shadow of modern skyscrapers in Dallas, Union Terminal Company 0-6-0 (a cousin to the Southern Pacific S-13) switched streamliners, mail, and express, under steam until replaced by a diesel purchased from the Santa Fe.

Gads, this old Texan (I passed Milepost 71 this 4th of July) just got a gob full of goosebumps! 

When in the D/FW area be sure and stop by M-A-L Hobby Shop, located at 108 Lee Street, in Irving. It is one of the last original brick and mortar hobby shops left in Texas.  Sadly, Hall's Hobby House, which was on Bryan Street in Dallas is no more, however, you still get a big friendly Howdy! from MAL owner Ed Seay, Jr. when you enter his shop.

   

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