Luxury, comfort, and class distinctions

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Posted by agentatascadero on Monday, December 05, 2016 8:11 PM

timz

 

 
wjstix
Quite a few heavyweight cars were built with, or converted to, ice-cooled air conditioning during the 1920's.

 

Anybody know of a train that claimed to have air-conditioning in the 1920s?

 

B&O placed their first air conditioned car, a diner, in service in 1930, and their first all air conditioned train in 1931.  Pullman Co first experimented with air conditioning in their sleeping cars in the 1927-'29 time frame.  AA

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Posted by Trinity River Bottoms Boomer on Tuesday, December 06, 2016 4:28 AM

If I'm not mistaken, Southern Pacific started experimenting quite early with air conditioning, in order to equip it's passenger fleet with this "cool" feature.  I can't provide the dates, stand corrected, and request help from the Peanut Gallery.  Like Howdy Doody, I have a wooden head, only mine was attacked by an angry army of termites.   

RME
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Posted by RME on Tuesday, December 06, 2016 11:21 PM

Trinity River Bottoms Boomer
If I'm not mistaken, Southern Pacific started experimenting quite early with air conditioning, in order to equip it's passenger fleet with this "cool" feature.

Diners with ice-activated air conditioning in 1932; at least 165 cars with it by 1934.  But not quite as early as B&O...

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Posted by wjstix on Wednesday, December 07, 2016 2:51 PM

timz
 
wjstix
Quite a few heavyweight cars were built with, or converted to, ice-cooled air conditioning during the 1920's.

OK, well I stand corrected. Should have said 1930's.

BTW apparently those non-corridor "slam door" English passenger cars were a great boon to robbers. A bad guy could get into the same section as a couple of wealthy folks at one station, hold them up, and take off with the loot as the train pulled into the next station a few miles down the line.

 

Stix
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Posted by M636C on Thursday, December 08, 2016 4:35 AM

wjstix

 

timz
 
wjstix
Quite a few heavyweight cars were built with, or converted to, ice-cooled air conditioning during the 1920's.

 

 

OK, well I stand corrected. Should have said 1930's.

BTW apparently those non-corridor "slam door" English passenger cars were a great boon to robbers. A bad guy could get into the same section as a couple of wealthy folks at one station, hold them up, and take off with the loot as the train pulled into the next station a few miles down the line.

 

 

 Are you familiar with the Agatha Christie story "The 4.50 from Paddington"?

A quick summary:

Our female detective heroine boards the train in the title, an express. Her train overtakes another stopping train made up of compartment cars. A closed blind flies up revealing the face of a woman being strangled by an out of sight figure.

The lady detective reports this to the train guard and the police but no body is found. She investigates herself, walking along the track disguised as a male track worker, finds a likely location, and gets employed as a servant in the house adjacent to the track where she finds the body.

There was a B&W movie starring Margaret Rutherford, and a later TV version in colour.

Peter

 
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Posted by daveklepper on Thursday, December 08, 2016 6:14 AM

1920's?  Yes, Pullman did have some experimental ice air-condiitoining systems in sleeping cars 1927-on.  1929 started a more general application.  I think in 1929 there may have been advertizements.

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Posted by erikem on Wednesday, December 14, 2016 12:48 AM

Perhaps the first attempts at air conditioning were done by the Santa Fe for diners - using ice. Also seem to recall that the PV built for the "Millionaire Brakeman" had one of the very first A/C's applied to a railroad car.

On a somewhat related subject, the Northern Ohio Traction had some electrically powered mechanical reefers in 1926.

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Posted by Trinity River Bottoms Boomer on Tuesday, December 20, 2016 4:04 AM

There's only one Miss Marple: Margaret Rutherford!  The MGM produced B&W motion picture is a classic and can be seen over and over again!  British Railways sure put on one good steam show!  I got to see the Flying Scotsman in Dallas on it's US tour.  A beautiful machine!

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Posted by northeaster on Friday, December 30, 2016 7:31 PM

I just returned from a trip Syracuse, NY/Lamy, NM and on the home leg aboard the Lake Shore Limited, had a conversation with the sleeper attendant who had worked for many years on Pullman cars both in the US and in Mexico. He described for me the elaborate process of making up section berths including installing cooling fans which were quite a chore given his description of the work involved. Passenger comfort came at quite a price in terms of labor by staff in those days.

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Posted by Trinity River Bottoms Boomer on Tuesday, February 07, 2017 3:08 AM

Donald J. Cockroach is fast bringing back "Luxury, Comfort, and Class Distinction" not only to the USA but to the entire planet in the process.  Welcome to the New World Order according to Trump!

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Posted by daveklepper on Tuesday, February 07, 2017 7:09 AM

Donald may surprise you.   If he strayes too far, there is always impeachment.  The Dems did not impeach Bill when he lied under oath before Congress, but Republicans were ready to impeach Nixon over Watergate.  And that, friends, is why I voted for Trump.   Having been in the service, with a security clearance, I understood that Hillary had already performed an impeachable offence, one that got Iranian and Iraqi friends of the USA killed or worse.

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Posted by Trinity River Bottoms Boomer on Wednesday, February 08, 2017 11:25 AM

Hey Dave, Mr. "T" got my vote too!  I well remember Billy Boy and Silly Hillary and White Water too!  Poor Monica.  I wonder, did Billy Boy use Billy Boy* products in the "Oral Office"?

Find out more about Billy Boy at www.billy-boy.de and enjoy your day!:)

 

 

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Posted by BaltACD on Wednesday, February 08, 2017 7:59 PM

Sad day for the country when a choice had to be made between intolerable and intolerable.

Never too old to have a happy childhood!

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Posted by daveklepper on Thursday, February 09, 2017 8:25 AM

I won't argue with that statement.

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Posted by CSSHEGEWISCH on Thursday, February 09, 2017 10:05 AM

daveklepper

Having been in the service, with a security clearance, I understood that Hillary had already performed an impeachable offence, one that got Iranian and Iraqi friends of the USA killed or worse.

 
An impeachable offense is whatever 50% plus one members of the House of Representatives deem one to be, with apologies to the late Gerald R. Ford.
The daily commute is part of everyday life but I get two rides a day out of it. Paul
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Posted by daveklepper on Thursday, February 09, 2017 10:24 AM

I agree with that statement.  And I made it clear that I was giving a personal opinion, based on my service expedrience and the news reports of deaths in Iraq and Iran.  Is it only 50% + one?   Thought more were required.

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Posted by Trinity River Bottoms Boomer on Thursday, February 09, 2017 10:58 AM

Oh but we did have a choice:  A Crook or a Con Man!

What a bummer!:(

Thank God we still have The World's Greatest Hobby.  Model railroading (and railfanning too) has no borders or walls and can bring family, friends, strangers, and newcomers together.     

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Posted by M636C on Thursday, February 09, 2017 11:20 PM

daveklepper

1920's?  Yes, Pullman did have some experimental ice air-condiitoining systems in sleeping cars 1927-on.  1929 started a more general application.  I think in 1929 there may have been advertizements.

 

In Otto Perry's amazing on-line collection in the Denver Public Library, there is a photo of the Emerson boiler B&O President Class Pacific No 5320 on display, I think at the Fair of the Iron Horse in 1927. Coupled behind it on display are some passenger cars, including a dining car with the very distinctive air conditioning duct over the dining area. That would seem to suggest that air conditioning was indeed in use in 1927. 

Peter

RME
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Posted by RME on Friday, February 10, 2017 10:17 AM

M636C
there is a photo of the Emerson boiler B&O President Class Pacific No 5320 on display, I think at the Fair of the Iron Horse in 1927.

This would be remarkable indeed, since all the records I have indicate that the President Cleveland wasn't even built until 1928.

I'd suggest no earlier than Chicago World's Fair of 1933, which would be right in there with "new" air-conditioning being shown off by the B&O.

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Posted by timz on Friday, February 10, 2017 12:10 PM

This Perry pic says August 1934

http://digital.denverlibrary.org/cdm/singleitem/collection/p15330coll22/id/58009/rec/1

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Posted by BaltACD on Friday, February 10, 2017 1:57 PM

Never too old to have a happy childhood!

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Posted by M636C on Sunday, February 12, 2017 5:31 AM

BaltACD

 

 
timz

 

 

Save

 

 

Clearly I've been posting too late at night instead of sleeping.

It has been exceptionally hot, even at night. It is lucky that global warming isn't real or I'd never get any sleep. Yesterday was within 1/4 degree celcius of the highest temperature ever recorded in this part of the world (41.25 degrees) and the highest ever recorded in February, and the nights have remained hot. There are six or so really serious forest fires running around north of here, while Western Australia has recorded the highest known one day rainfall and serious flooding. Right here it cooled right down after a cloud front came through late yesterday (just before I gave up photographing trains....)

Of course taking train photos involves standing in the sunlight while the shade temperatures are being quoted above. That can't help my brain either...

Peter

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Posted by Miningman on Sunday, February 12, 2017 10:05 AM

M636C-...meanwhile up here in Northern Saskatchewan we hit -40 C and colder yet with the wind. For our American friends thats a swing of about 146deg F. Of course you are in summer and we in winter.

Theoretically if we meet in the middle somewhere it should be nice and temperate, but maybe no trains in the middle. 

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Posted by De Luxe on Thursday, February 16, 2017 8:25 PM

Can somebody tell me why in the USA and Canada there have never been used "Classes" on the passenger trains like in Europe?

Europe has/had first class/second class/third class and even fourth class coaches, sleepers and sometimes even diners. And always the class number was visible, usually near the doors.

Why US and Canadian trains never had this? Why are coaches in in North America considered 2nd class and sleepers 1st class?

What´s the reason behind that totally different use of classes in railroading between the 2 continents?

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Posted by Deggesty on Thursday, February 16, 2017 8:34 PM

De Luxe

Can somebody tell me why in the USA and Canada there have never been used "Classes" on the passenger trains like in Europe?

Europe has/had first class/second class/third class and even fourth class coaches, sleepers and sometimes even diners. And always the class number was visible, usually near the doors.

Why US and Canadian trains never had this? Why are coaches in in North America considered 2nd class and sleepers 1st class?

What´s the reason behind that totally different use of classes in railroading between the 2 continents?

 

We developed our own usages, just as we developed our means of coupling cars and stopping trains, and did not copy the British or Continental usages.

A sleeping car and a parlor car have much more comfortable accommodations for pasengers than a coach car does; thus travel in these is "first class" travel. There is also somewhat more personal attention given passengers in "first class" cars.

Sleeping cars operated by the Pullman Company had PULLMAN by the outside doors.

Johnny

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Posted by CSSHEGEWISCH on Friday, February 17, 2017 10:10 AM

In the United States, travel was either first class (sleeper or parlor car) or coach.  First class passengers paid a first class rail fare (about 15-20% higher than coach) plus a space or seat charge.  Slumbercoach was intended to be an intermediate class with coach fares plus a space charge.

First class cars were not necessarily Pullman-operated.  Most parlor cars and some local sleeping cars were railroad-operated.

The daily commute is part of everyday life but I get two rides a day out of it. Paul

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