Classic Train Questions Part Deux (50 Years or Older)

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Posted by narig01 on Thursday, October 04, 2018 3:12 PM
The number 6 Pelham line has express service in the Bronx. Currently.
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Posted by narig01 on Thursday, October 04, 2018 3:35 PM

This will probably be an easy one of maybe not.

This 2 foot narrow gauge was not in Maine. Had a length of 15 miles. Ran 44 miles from the state capital. It also ran on dual gauge track for a short distance. It shared track with another narrow gauge. It ran excursions each summer. The excursion was 75 cents with lunch. The line had a warming house for use in winter.

 

Name the line.

 

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Posted by Miningman on Thursday, October 04, 2018 4:37 PM

Wholly Mackinaw Dave K, those explanations and descriptions of yours about the NY Transit and Subway systems are heavier than Overmods screeds ,( they are fabulous, dazzling)) on technical descriptions of the how and why something in motion works or doesn't and a whole lot of other things. 

I envision a power point presentation with multi coloured spaghetti all over the place and Rodney Dangerfield, Ben Stein and John Cleese taking turns with the pointer. 

Test tomorrow, so pay attention. 

( I really do try to follow... does anyone really know the whole thing?)

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Posted by daveklepper on Friday, October 05, 2018 1:33 AM

The two-foot gauge at South Caever, Massachusetts, Edeaville (Sp?) around cranberry boggs, with some standard gauge track for preserved equipment? 

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Posted by daveklepper on Saturday, October 06, 2018 2:45 PM

Ellis t Atwood was the owner, I believe, and some of the standard gauge equipmenet went to Nelson Blount and Steamtown in Bellows Falls, except the Flying Yankee to Hobo RR and a separate organization.  The Maine narrow-gauge museums got the 2-foot gauge equipment.

Rode it around 1950.

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Posted by narig01 on Saturday, October 06, 2018 10:47 PM

It shared track with another narrow gauge.

Another clue this common carrier and it's connection were west of the Mississippi River.

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Posted by daveklepper on Sunday, October 07, 2018 7:36 AM

"Gilpin Tram"

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Posted by rcdrye on Sunday, October 07, 2018 12:53 PM

The only two footer I could find involving a state capital was the Montgomery Southern, which seems to have operated in Alabama between 1881 and 1886 (or 1882 and 1889) without leaving much of a literary or cartographic trace.  There were some three footers in the Montgomery area.  The Montgomery Southern seems to have been useful enough to have ended up as part of the Atlantic Coast Line.

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Posted by narig01 on Sunday, October 07, 2018 2:56 PM

daveklepper

"Gilpin Tram"

You got it.

Originally started as The Gilpin Tramway Company in 1887. Later renamed The Gilpin Railroad was a 2 footer from Blackhawk, Co. It ran on a short distance of dual gauge track in Blackhawk with the 3 foot  Colorado Central, later Colorado and Southern. Sold to the C&S in 1906. Ended trains in 1917 and then sold for scrap.
     I think all the locomotives were Shays. The railroad had numerous switchbacks to gain altitude. It had curves of 50 foot radius. 
 
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Posted by narig01 on Sunday, October 07, 2018 3:01 PM

rcdrye

The only two footer I could find involving a state capital was the Montgomery Southern, which seems to have operated in Alabama between 1881 and 1886 (or 1882 and 1889) without leaving much of a literary or cartographic trace.  There were some three footers in the Montgomery area.  The Montgomery Southern seems to have been useful enough to have ended up as part of the Atlantic Coast Line.

 

I should apologize here for not being more specific. The Gilpin Tramway measured distances from Denver. It was not where it originated. 

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Posted by daveklepper on Wednesday, October 10, 2018 1:15 PM

We are waiting for rc's question.

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Posted by rcdrye on Saturday, October 13, 2018 8:18 AM

A coal hauling narrow gauge railroad operated in and around the capital of a state known for narrow gauge railroads, but could not interchange with the other NG lines, even though they touched at more than one point.  Name the state and the reason the interchange wouldn't work.

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Posted by daveklepper on Saturday, October 13, 2018 12:46 PM

Denver Tramways was narrow gauge and did haul coal on at least one interurban line.  But the gauge was 3 feet, six inches.  It also had some dual-gauge track, used for railroad interchange standard-gauge freight.

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Posted by rcdrye on Monday, October 15, 2018 7:28 AM

Correct.  The interurban line operated under the name Denver & Intermountain.  The 3' 6" gauge was inherited from Denver's cable cars.

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Posted by daveklepper on Monday, October 15, 2018 9:43 AM

A railroad that into the 1950s was known for good, reasonably fast, full-service (all varieties) passenger service, including some interline with more than one other railroad, and where Amtrak does indeed operate today, had one main-line local train with a nickname that occasionally was used officially and that included a sea-creature.  Railroad, train, and end-points please.

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