Classic Train Questions Part Deux (50 Years or Older)

676709 views
6314 replies
1 rating 2 rating 3 rating 4 rating 5 rating
  • Member since
    May, 2012
  • 3,273 posts
Posted by rcdrye on Tuesday, May 01, 2018 6:52 AM

Today's Photo of the day (5/1/2018) shows that the B&OCT bridge was lowered at least as late as 1972.  I'm not sure when the last tracks were removed.

  • Member since
    May, 2012
  • 3,273 posts
Posted by rcdrye on Thursday, May 03, 2018 8:32 AM

It appears that B&O/CSX kept a small yard with stored equipment on the east side of the river until 1991, mainly for tax purposes.

  • Member since
    May, 2012
  • 3,273 posts
Posted by rcdrye on Saturday, May 05, 2018 6:23 PM

So... Overmod, you are up!

  • Member since
    November, 2005
  • From: Hope, AR
  • 1,968 posts
Posted by narig01 on Wednesday, May 09, 2018 1:30 AM

The interesting thing I thought was the design engineer, Joseph Strauss, went onto bigger bridges. The biggest being the Golden Gate Bridge in San Francisco. 

Chicago did a survey a few years back to see which bridges had historic significance. The links below are what I found in the St Charles Airline bridge. The site also has more bridges.

 

http://historicbridges.org/illinois/sbrr/original_haer-il-157.htm

http://historicbridges.org/bridges/browser/?bridgebrowser=illinois/sbrr/

 

Not sure if I got the links right  

 

  • Member since
    September, 2013
  • 2,553 posts
Posted by Miningman on Friday, May 11, 2018 11:31 PM

Well it's been a week so I thought perhaps an interim question while we are waiting.

So what is this?  New? Old? Where? What? Name of Builder?

https://i.imgur.com/S4hZUz3.jpg

 

  • Member since
    May, 2012
  • 3,273 posts
Posted by rcdrye on Saturday, May 12, 2018 6:50 AM

Miningman
New? Old? Where? What?

New - rebuild by Brookville Equipment of El Paso TX prewar PCC car 1506; Old: Delivered new to El Paso in 1937 by St.Louis Car Co.  Originally air-electric, probably all electric in the Brookville rebuild.  Used in El Paso and Ciudad Juarez, Mexico between 1937 and 1974, stored in El Paso since 1974. Where: at the Brookville plant.  Note the dual-gauge track on Brookville's turntable, standard and Pennsylvania gauge.

Brookville is one of the leaders in both new and rebuilt transit equipment, having delivered new "Liberty" streetcars to Dallas TX.

http://www.brookvillecorp.com/BROOKVILLE-Delivers-First-El-Paso-Streetcar.asp?news=news-streetcar.asp

  • Member since
    September, 2013
  • 2,553 posts
Posted by Miningman on Saturday, May 12, 2018 9:53 AM

Wow, an absolute perfect answer. Excellent!

The next question goes to you. 

  • Member since
    September, 2013
  • 2,553 posts
Posted by Miningman on Saturday, May 12, 2018 3:41 PM

I have to add to this that paint scheme is outstanding. It is reminiscent of the 50's. 

People think the 50's were dull and grey but they are sorely mistaken, cars, fashion, trains were all beautifully styled with outstanding colour.

  • Member since
    June, 2002
  • 13,716 posts
Posted by daveklepper on Sunday, May 13, 2018 2:22 AM

All three paint schemes that were used over their years of operation in El Paso are being applied to the reguilt cars.  All three are colorful, but this is probably the classiest.

  • Member since
    May, 2012
  • 3,273 posts
Posted by rcdrye on Sunday, May 13, 2018 1:04 PM

Some of the PCC schemes were very bright, even before Pittsburgh's PAT created the "Mod Desire" scheme on car 1730.

http://www.streetcarmike.com/patransit/pat_pcc1730_mountlebanonblvd_oct211973.jpg

 

So, another PCC question:  This city's entire fleet of PCCs was delivered with hand controls, though many cars were modifed for pedal control later for optional one man/two man operation.

  • Member since
    March, 2016
  • From: Burbank IL (near Clearing)
  • 10,508 posts
Posted by CSSHEGEWISCH on Monday, May 14, 2018 10:12 AM

I'm going to say that the fleet in question is Chicago Surface Lines/CTA.

The daily commute is part of everyday life but I get two rides a day out of it. Paul
  • Member since
    May, 2012
  • 3,273 posts
Posted by rcdrye on Monday, May 14, 2018 5:28 PM

CSSHEGEWISCH

I'm going to say that the fleet in question is Chicago Surface Lines/CTA.

 

Yep, all 683 of 'em!  CSL was the only operator to specify two-man cars, which were also longer and wider than "standard" PCCs, and offset to the right for passing clearance.  Prewar and postwar models saw some conversion to one-man/two-man in the early 1950s, at which time the foot pedals were activated.  Prewar cars loaded from the front, postwar cars from the rear in two man service.  All but one of the prewar and one of the postwar Chicago PCCs were scrapped, though 570 of the 600 postwar cars gave up window sashes, door motors, trucks, motors and controls to CTA's 6201-6720 and 1-50 series rapid transit cars.  The last Chicago streetcar line, Wentworth Avenue (now next to the Dan Ryan Expressway) ran with two-man postwar PCCs.

  • Member since
    March, 2016
  • From: Burbank IL (near Clearing)
  • 10,508 posts
Posted by CSSHEGEWISCH on Thursday, May 17, 2018 10:04 AM

I'll stick with Chicago PCC's, only rapid transit this time.  What feature distinguishes the first 200 CTA PCC rapid transit cars from the rest of the fleet?

The daily commute is part of everyday life but I get two rides a day out of it. Paul
  • Member since
    May, 2012
  • 3,273 posts
Posted by rcdrye on Saturday, May 19, 2018 6:35 PM

The "Flat Door Sixes" 6001-6200 have flat doors recessed from the fishbelly curce of the carbody. They were built new by St Louis Car. There were also some variations in conductor controls and headlight within the series.  The remainder had new carbodies (also StLCC) with new curved doors matching the carbodies. They were equipped with window parts, door motors, propulsion equipment and some seat parts from CTA's postwar PCC streetcars.

The most remarkable features of the Flat Door Sixes were the footholds on each side of the car on the drawbar end (All of the 6000 series were "married pairs").  The conductor was originally expected to operate the train doors from that position, with one foot on each car.  The conductor's position was pretty quickly relocated to the inside of the car.

  • Member since
    March, 2016
  • From: Burbank IL (near Clearing)
  • 10,508 posts
Posted by CSSHEGEWISCH on Monday, May 21, 2018 10:03 AM

We have a winner here.  rcdrye, it's your question.

The daily commute is part of everyday life but I get two rides a day out of it. Paul

SUBSCRIBER & MEMBER LOGIN

Login, or register today to interact in our online community, comment on articles, receive our newsletter, manage your account online and more!

FREE NEWSLETTER SIGNUP

Get the Classic Trains twice-monthly newsletter