Classic Train Questions Part Deux (50 Years or Older)

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Posted by daveklepper on Tuesday, July 11, 2017 3:07 PM

The original West End line as a steam railroad was built and inaugurated from the 39th Street Ferry pier to Coney Island by Charles Guenthner, CGS graduate, as the West End. Bath Beach, and Coney Island Railroad.  Much of the RoW became New Utrecht Avenue, which for many years had the West End Streetcar line with West End subway trains on the elevated structure above.  When the Brooklyn United elevated system bought the line frolm Guenthner, they immediately strung trolley wire, built a connection to the Fifth Avenue elevated, and began running gate-car elevated trains with service first to Sand Street and the Fulton Ferry in Brooklyn, then over the Brooklyn Bridge after they took over and electrified the cable Brooklyln Bridge railroad, to Park Row. Manhattan.  After the elevated structure and the Stillwell Avnue terminal were complete, steel subway cars took over with service to Manhattan via the 4th Avenue subway and the Manhattan Bridge.  This remains in effect todoay, except that the B trains run up 6th Avenue instead of Broadway and continue as locals on Central Park West and into The Bronx.

But as traffic grew, elevated cars made a comback, including of course this RoW.  Until post-WWII B-division cars began arriving, after 1948, rush hour steel West End trains were cut back from Coney Island to Bay Parkway, and wood gate-car elevated trains provided the rush hours service between there and Coney Island.  Since these cars had subway-type third rail shoes, they were painted green instead of the usual BMT brown, so avoid being sent into the wrong service or mixed with normal elevated cars.

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Posted by wanswheel on Tuesday, July 11, 2017 5:41 PM
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Posted by Miningman on Tuesday, July 11, 2017 5:51 PM

April 28, 1929 - First run of Niagara Falls Delxue - cars painted brown and gold.  Locomotive was CASO 8207 

You are correct Wanswheel.

8207 was a Hudson ...this was a Michigan Central assigned number but the railroaders called them CASO Hudson's. There were 30 of them. 

Also would like to add talk of Coney Island totally apropos as it is summer time and what better place than the beach.

I really got a kick out of Dave Klepper informing us of trains running " if it's a sunny day". They must have had better weathermen back then. Never would have thought that from a big big city...something you would expect from small town rural locals  where things are more informal. Great story. 

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Posted by wanswheel on Tuesday, July 11, 2017 8:18 PM

What Columbia Grammar School dropout preceded Commodore Vanderbilt as president of the Hudson River Railroad, and where is his statue?

 

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Posted by wanswheel on Wednesday, July 12, 2017 11:25 AM

Commodore Vanderbilt’s statue has to be the oldest man-made thing at Grand Central Terminal, originally atop St. Johns Park freight station.  The statue of the subject of this question also has been moved over the years.

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Posted by Miningman on Wednesday, July 12, 2017 12:44 PM

I give up..think I got the guy but cannot find the statue. Found some older postings by you ( Wanswheel) circa 2008 re all of this but the pics have succumbed to the photobucket purge. 

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Posted by wanswheel on Wednesday, July 12, 2017 2:05 PM

Kind of a downer that photobucket. Have to be philosophical, nobody died.

Another hint: He has something in common with Chauncey Depew, for whom is named Depew, NY.

RME
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Posted by RME on Wednesday, July 12, 2017 2:42 PM

Surely it is this guy in Hoboken

Nice hint pix.  General site is right there front and center, I think...

Also nice trick hint.  The statue was not so much 'moved' as turned around to face the other way.

Calling him a 'dropout' is a bit unfair.  If your father had died when you were 14 you might have left prep school, too.

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Posted by Miningman on Wednesday, July 12, 2017 3:02 PM

So "Daily except Sunday" can be traced to him! No railroad operations on Sundays. 

I thought perhaps it also could be Erastus Corning, was searching that one as well. 

Wonder if Erastus will ever make a comeback as a first name?

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Posted by wanswheel on Wednesday, July 12, 2017 3:15 PM

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